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Fujikura reintroducing Vista Pro line of shafts for 2021

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When most golfers think premium aftermarket golf shafts they think premium aftermarket prices surpassing $300, $400, and even $500. But with the introduction of the newly redesigned Fujikura Vista Pro line of shafts for 2021, Fujikura is giving golfers and club fitters more opportunities to get maximum performance at a more affordable price in their metal woods, hybrids, and irons.

The all-new Fujikura Vista Pro series was redesigned from scratch using the latest materials and by utilizing data and design principles from high-end Fujikura models like the extremely popular Ventus. The key to the new Vista Pro shafts is they’re flighted based on their weight and flex category to help those at lower speeds increase launch while stronger players get the benefit of extra stability and flight control.

Fujikura Vista Pro history

The Vista Pro series of shafts date back to the early 2000s when they were a very popular aftermarket option—especially the 70-90 grams versions in fairway woods. The Vista Pro wood shafts tag-teamed alongside the original Speeder series as a generally more playable and slightly softer shaft that could be easily tuned to fit golfers and offer both stability and a smooth feel.

The History of Vista Pro from Fujikura President Dave Schnider

“Back in early 1999, Fujikura decided to introduce aftermarket shafts to the U.S. market. We also wanted to sell a premium shaft line that was specifically designed for club fitters to fit all levels of players. We had shafts already designed from Japan such as Speeder 757, SIX, Pro 95 planned as our premium offerings as they used exotic materials (like Triax) but we wanted a fitting line that was more affordable to the end golfer and still gave the club fitter a variety of options. So we designed Vista Pro.”    

“The original Vista Pro line was designed based off the Fit On 11 series from Japan, but we designed them with standard materials and did not use the costly exotic materials from Japan. The goal was to design a high-performance shaft line that can be fit to all levels of golfers. It was also the first true fitting shaft line in the U.S. market with weights from 50-90 grams with the same branding and cosmetics. U.S. shafts companies at the time only had offerings of a specific shaft model and/or brand in different weight or profile ranges.  Standard weight shafts and ultralight shafts were branded differently and designed for different players.”  

“We decided to design a full line of shafts where a player can be fit into one or more weight categories within their woods and irons that have consistent bend profiles no matter the weight and have the same branding and cosmetics. Our factory at the time was located in Vista, California (Vista) and we knew how important PGA Tour players (pro) were at the time, so we wanted to make sure they wanted to try this line. We named it Vista Pro.”

What’s new with the 2021 Vista Pro?

For the 2021 Vista Pro series, the focus of the design was on versatility and playability and the designers at Fujikura achieved this by

  • Incorporating stronger materials for the full length of the shafts rather than just in sections to create a smooth, balanced profile. This idea was born from the proven performance of full-length Velocore in Ventus.
  • A new multi-material bias core within the layers of the shafts creates improved consistency and the strength of the 40-ton carbon fiber allowed the lighter weight models to be lighter without sacrificing dispersion.

The end result is a full line of easily customizable shafts that helps improve launch and spin while remaining highly consistent at lighter weights, and stable at heavier weights. This also helps golfers by offering high-performance designs at a lower price point.

Specs, price, and availability

At retail (a network of 600-plus charter dealers): Available now

Price

  • $125 each for the driver/fairway wood shaft
  • $55 each for the hybrid version
  • $50 for the iron shafts

Wood shaft specs

Hybrid shaft specs

Iron shaft specs

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Ryan Barath is a club-fitter & master club builder with more than 17 years of experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour players. He is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf. He now works independently from his home shop and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, and share his passion for club building, course architecture and wedge grinding.

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Skip Griffin

    Feb 10, 2021 at 12:05 pm

    I wish Fujikura would bring back the Vista Tour shafts. The best numbers I ever got on a LM were with the Vista Tour.

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Whats in the Bag

Andrew Novak WITB 2024 (February)

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Driver: Ping G430 LST (9 degrees)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Smoke Green RDX 75 TX

3-wood: TaylorMade Stealth Plus (15 degrees)
Shaft: Project X HZRDRUS Smoke Black TX

5-wood: Callaway Rogue ST (18 degrees)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Black 6.5 X

Irons: Srixon ZX7 Mk II (4-6), Srixon Z-Forged II (7-PW)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: Cleveland RTX 6 ZipCore Tour Rack (50-MID10, 54-FULL12, 60-FULL9)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Putter: Odyssey Ai-One Milled Two T CH

Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet Cord

 

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Mizuno Pro 241, 243, 245 irons review – Club Junkie Review

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Mizuno irons have always been highly regarded and coveted by golfers who place feel high on their wants list. The new Mizuno Pro series irons blend soft and responsive Mizuno feel with some of the latest tech for all-around performance.

With the release of the Mizuno Pro 241, 243, and 245, there is an iron for just about any golfer. I was hitting these irons on a very cold (about 18 degrees) range, so the carry and ball speed numbers are probably not the most optimal, but the signature Mizuno feel was impressive! For the full review please check out the Club Junkie Podcast below and on any podcast platform.

Mizuno Pro 241, 243, 245 irons review

Mizuno Pro 241 irons

If you are a highly skilled player or just love blades, the 241’s compact size and single-piece forged construction should lure you in. I think the shape of the 241 is great with a little more of a boxy and sharper toe. Mizuno has really improved the look of the short irons over the past few iron generations, and the PW flows well with the set, not looking too large. The added bounce is welcome for steeper swings or players who play in softer conditions.

Mizuno also created more of a progressive set with flighted long irons for softer landings and more penetrating short irons for added control. The 241 are compact irons, but less intimidating than I expected when I took them out of the box. Feel is absolutely textbook Mizuno with a soft, yet solid feel even with less-than-ideal range balls.

Launch was higher than I initially expected but then I remembered the more traditional, weaker lofts. Distance wasn’t long by today’s standards but it was very consistent. Solid strikes launched through the same window and traveled the same distance every time; mishits were predictable in their distance loss. I was hitting the 241’s pretty well, and my misses weren’t too extreme but you do notice a little larger variation in distance between well-struck and toe misses.

While the launch is high, this is a blade, and it allows skilled players to flight the ball down, hit it high, or right and left very easily. I also noticed that the 241 is a little more forgiving than you might expect. Now, you aren’t going to get away with hitting it anywhere on the face, but slight misses will still probably get to the front of the green. We are stuck on mats here so no way for me to test turf interaction yet, but the added bounce should give steeper-swing players or those playing in soft conditions some added playability.

Mizuno Pro 243 irons

Right out of the box, these seemed a little chunkier than the previous 223 from all angles but address. I loved the look from address as they are a little more rounded and softer than the 241. These might have the widest sole out of the three models, but there is some trailing edge relief that should allow the iron to get through the turf quickly and without added digging.

I liked that the 243 was the highest-launching iron for me and was a little surprised with that since they are a couple of degrees stronger than the 241. I don’t hit a high ball, and the 243 was giving me the best visual window of the group to hit high shots that land softly on the green. The slightly large blade size gives you a little more confidence that you don’t have to be as surgically precise as with the 241, and if you do miss a little, you won’t be penalized for it. Shots off the toe, my usual miss, still carried good ball speed and stayed online better than I expected.

For more of a players cavity design, the 243 was a very straight iron on most misses. Now, if you got far from the center, you would be able to see some distance drop off and more movement to the shot. Strikes made lower on the face still elevated and you didn’t see a huge difference in the launch window on those. The 243 also gave you a little sense of speed with the 4- and 7-irons, not 245 speed, but I felt like the iron was helping add a little to the shot with the longer irons.

Sound and feel were very good as you would expect with a Mizuno Pro iron. Center and close-to-center contact gives you this soft and solid thud as the ball leaves the face and the 243 retains a good amount of that even slightly outside of center. More extreme misses are met with a decent click, but the longer irons are slightly more dampened than the short irons due to the insert behind the face.

Mizuno Pro 245 irons

This is the iron where I think Mizuno made the biggest improvement from the 225. Sound and feel are very subjective, but I felt like the 245 offered a more muted sound and softer feel than its previous version. While the hollow body design doesn’t offer the solid feel and responsiveness of the 241 and 243, it does give the player plenty of both. The face definitely gives the sensation of the ball jumping off it for added speed, but it doesn’t feel uncontrolled.

From my range session with them, the performance delta between good and poor struck shots was small and tight. Center shots left the face quickly and for me flew a little more penetrating and boring into the sky. These have the strongest lofts of the trio, but you still won’t have any issues getting the ball in the air, even with the long irons. The look of the 245 is also really good, giving you that more players compact look and little offset that promotes confidence and comfort.

I loved how straight and far mishits flew with this iron as the hot face was able to make up for my lack of perfection. My shots that were further off the toe than I care to admit still stayed in play as gentle draws instead of big hooks that smaller irons would produce. Striking the 245 a groove or two low also didn’t penalize you with a screaming ball six feet off the ground that runs forever, the iron was still able to elevate that shot and provide enough lift to hit the green and hold it. This iron is going to fit a wide range of players and combo up nicely with the 243 for some added help in the long irons.

In conclusion, Mizuno really upgraded the Pro iron line without disrupting the DNA of the design. Added playability and forgiveness in the 241 will open that iron up to golfers looking to work the ball around the course. At the same time, the 243 will fit a wider range of golfers who love compact irons but need a little added distance and forgiveness. Players who fit into the 245 will love the performance they expect from a hollow body iron and experience soft feel and sound that you don’t always get with those types of irons.

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Heavy Artillery: A look at some of the drivers in play at the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am

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What are the driver and shaft combinations of the best golfers in the world? For gearheads, it’s an endlessly interesting question — even if we can only ever aspire to play LS heads and 7 TX shafts.

At this week’s AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am, GolfWRX got in-hand looks at the driver setups of more than 20 players.

Check out some of the most interesting combos below, then head to the GolfWRX forums for the rest, as well as the rest of our galleries from Pebble Beach.

Justin Thomas

Driver: Titleist TSR3 (10 degrees @9, D1 SureFit setting)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana ZF 60 TX

Seamus Power

Driver: Ping G430 LST (9 degrees @9.5)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Smoke Green 60 6.5 TX (45.5 inches, tipped 1 inch)

Adam Hadwin

Driver: Callaway Paradym Ai Smoke Triple Diamond (10.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana PD 60 TX

Byeong Hun An

Driver: Titleist TSR4 (9 degrees @9.75, B2 SureFit Setting)
Shaft: Fujikura Motore X F1 6 X

Nicolai Hojgaard

Driver: Callaway Paradym Triple Diamond (10.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei 1K White 70 TX

Nick Dunlap

Driver: TaylorMade Qi10 LS (9 degrees, draw setting)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Smoke Green 6.5 60 TX

Jordan Spieth

Driver: Titleist TSR2 (10 degrees @9.25, D1 SureFit setting)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Black 6 X

Sam Burns

Driver: Callaway Paradym Triple Diamond S (9 degrees @10)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Blue 7 TX

Adam Scott

Driver: Callaway Paradym Triple Diamond Max (9 degrees, D setting)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus TR Blue 7 X

Buffalo Bills’ QB Josh Allen

Driver: TaylorMade Qi10 (9 degrees @7.5)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Black 7 X

  • See in-hand photos of the rest of Josh Allen’s WITB here.

NBA great Pau Gasol

Driver: TaylorMade Stealth 2 Plus (9 degrees, draw setting)
Shaft: Fujikura Pro 2.0 Tour Spec 6 S

  • See in-hand photos of the rest of Pau Gasol’s WITB here.

Check out more WITBs and all our photos from Pebble.

 

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