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Opinion & Analysis

Is CBD the next wave of pain relief for golfers?

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We’ve all been there before: hit one too many balls on the range or stood bent over those short putts for 15 minutes too long.  The next step is usually right to an Advil, Tylenol, or any number of over-the-counter pain relievers to help with those aches and pains. But for golfers and athletes across the board, thanks to some new steps forward with the processing of hemp & cannabis products there are more options becoming available in the pain relief category including CBD (Cannabidiol).

CBD sprays and topical creams are one of the biggest trends in the market today, giving people options versus using the tried and true pain relief methods. We at GolfWRX witnessed this first hand at the PGA Show in Orlando where there were more than a handful of venders preaching the benefits of CBD.

Let’s be clear: yes, CBD is a product derived from cannabis, but it is a chemical compound found in the less modified hemp plant. It has no psychoactive effects, unlike its brother THC-delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (yeah, that a mouthful). CBD is in fact federally legal in all 50 states as a pain reliever and anti-inflammatory – meaning it’s also approved by the FDA. The big difference between hemp and a full breed marijuana plant is that marijuana has been continually modified to increase the THC levels to increase the mind-altering effects, while hemp has remained pretty much unchanged and is a common fiber used in clothing, rope, and a multitude of other textiles.

The most notable vendors at the PGA Show were Medterra, a producer of CBD products located in Kentucky, and FR Endosport, which also just recently announced an endorsement deal with PGA/PGA Champions player Scott McCarron. FR Endosport was also recently spotted on tour and became part of a discussion in our forums.

When you take out the fact that this is a pain reliever derived from hemp, and the misconceived notions about products derived from plants in the marijuana family, CBD is in fact a possible alternative for many individuals looking to try something new for those aches and pains, and we expect to see more CBD products at future PGA Shows and advertised on professional tours.

 

 

 

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Ryan Barath is a club-fitter & master club builder with more than 17 years of experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour players. He is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf. He now works independently from his home shop and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, and share his passion for club building, course architecture and wedge grinding.

4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. The dude

    Feb 1, 2019 at 10:05 pm

    ……picture that dude selling snake oil off the back of a wagon in 1892….same thing

    • Zzz

      Feb 2, 2019 at 8:22 pm

      Yeah. Just like the BS they sling about Epsom salts and stuff like that.
      But I do love me some snake blood drink 🙂

  2. X

    Feb 1, 2019 at 9:43 pm

    CBD has not been proved by anybody to have any benefits at all

  3. X

    Feb 1, 2019 at 9:40 pm

    Only losers use CBD.

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Club Junkie

Club Junkie: Reviewing TaylorMade’s P770 Irons and SuperStroke’s Wrist Lock Putter Grip!

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Finally, I have had a full set of TaylorMade P770 irons out on the course for the last few weeks. The P770 takes a bunch of DNA from the larger P790 and packs it into a smaller size. Don’t be fooled, the smaller size still gives you a bunch of distance and forgiveness! SuperStroke’s Wrist Lock putter grip is designed to help add stability and consistency to your putting stroke. It really does give you the feeling that the putter is locked into your stroke and won’t go anywhere.

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Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: My thoughts on single-length irons

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One of the bigger stories in golf equipment the past few years – thanks to Mr. De Chambeau – is the development of single-length irons. So, are they right for you or not? That’s a question only a fair trial can answer, but let me offer some thoughts on how your set make-up might look if you do take that direction.

First of all, the concept is not about single-length clubs — the conversation is about single-length irons. No one is playing a driver or fairway woods at the same length as their irons. Probably not even the hybrids. The putter is typically not either. So, the question is where in the set does the “single-length” begin and end?

I’ve long espoused the concept that your set of clubs (excluding the very specialized putter) should be divided into three sub-sets: Distance Clubs, Positioning Clubs, and Scoring Clubs. And generally speaking, these subsets each cover a specific range of lofts.

The Distance Clubs are those up to 20-25 degrees or so. This subset begins with your driver and encompasses your fairway woods and maybe your lowest loft hybrid or two. Your goal with these clubs is to move the ball “on out there” and put you in a place for your “positioning shot.”

The Positioning Clubs then begin after that highest loft Distance Club and take you up to 38 to 40 degrees of loft. Generally speaking, this subset would begin with your 3 or 4-iron or hybrid and go up to through your 7- or 8-iron. The goal with these clubs is to set up a reasonable putt or chip so you can get down in no more than 2-3 shots. My opinion is that it is only within this subset that “single-length” might serve you.

The Scoring Clubs – those over 38-40 degrees of loft — are the ones with which your scores will likely be determined. Long ago, I wrote several posts about the “round club mindset” when 8-irons had a more curved topline than the seven – a distinctly different look, and those 8-irons were 38 to 40 degrees. These are the clubs designed for putting the ball close enough for a makeable putt, hopefully, more often than not.

So, most conversations about single-length irons should be limited to that subset of “Positioning Clubs,” from your longest iron through that iron of 38-40 degrees. While many golfers may not see the distance separation between clubs that you would ideally like to have in that subset, others might. I’ve long observed that the distance a club can be hit is a combination of loft AND club shaft length. I just don’t see how you can get the range of distances from the longest to shortest in the set by changing loft only. I have tried several of these sets and just do not experience the distance differentials I want from that subset in my bag.

But I can certainly assure you that you simply cannot be as accurate with wedges that are 37 or 38 inches in length as you can with those clubs being 35 to 36 inches. It’s simple golf club physics. With very few exceptions, the shorter the club, the narrower your distance dispersion is going to be.

Consider that a “wide” shot with a 45-inch driver might be 30-40 yards off-line, while even the worst “wide” shot with your 35-and-three-quarter-inch pitching wedge is not likely to be more than 15 yards offline. In between, your lateral dispersion is progressively narrower as the shaft length is reduced.

So, I just cannot see why anyone would want to make their wedges the same length as their 5- or 6-iron, 37.5 to 38 inches, and give up the naturally more accurate dispersion that the shorter shaft delivers.

I am looking forward to hearing from those of you who have tried single-length irons and longer wedges to share your experiences.

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Golf's Perfect Imperfections

Golf’s Perfect Imperfections: Sharing some time with one of the best PGA Professionals in America

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Meet Jimmy Stewart. From his early childhood junior days in Singapore and Thailand, to golf course and driving range operator in California. We talk Turkey, where the game was, where it is and to where it’s going.

 

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