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Crossfield: How to choose a putter

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In this week’s Golf Swing Weekly Fix, I talk about the importance of choosing the correct putter for your game and how a fitting can open up a lot more options for you on the green.

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Mark Crossfield has been coaching golf for more than 20 years, and has enjoyed shaping the digital golf world with fresh, original and educated videos. Basically, I am that guy from YouTube. You can connect with Mark on Periscope (4golfonline) and Snapchat (AskGolfGuru), as well through the social media accounts linked below.

3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Fast Track

    Sep 28, 2016 at 7:26 am

    Big fan of Mark, but this was an awful waste of time.

  2. Jim

    Sep 22, 2016 at 10:55 am

    I’m telling all ya’ll putter fitting is for real. Absolutely as real as lie adjusting irons.

    Way back when dinosaurs roamed the earth first gen putter fitting was about the loft and getting the ball to roll better. We used high speed video but lie angle was based on feel & getting into a good ‘eyes over the ball’ posture.

    I’m 6’2 & have a ‘bad back’. I putt open, keep my upper body up a little more straight. I bend my knees & get my eyes over the ball etc… all my stuff is 2° up, and @ 35″ the center shaft mid-mallet and I were set up very well for a very square, almost no ‘arc’ putter stroke, so it stayed upright too.

    i was playing well. Mini-Tours, section events, Monday 4spots etc…but I had liprosy for years. 2 even 3 putts a round would hit the edge. It ceased to be ‘anecdotal’ and became a standing joke with the other guys; “Boy, if you ever get all thosr to drop”…etc… It cost me several big checks…

    In 2009 we bought the SAM Putt Lab system. While being trained how to use it and interpret the incredible data it produces… We had the loft good for my stroke but the report said I needed to be 3° FLAT – a net 5° change. No way anybody could’ve told me I needed anything flat.

    We bent the stick and I rolled 10/10 in the hole – FIRST TIME EVER (usually make 8, 9) on our (as flat as can be built) 12” putter fitting deck…I make more 8-16′ putts than ever.

    and……YES…..you gotta read the green & get the speed right….

    too late for my ‘mini-tour career’ but VERY eye-opening. Probably learned more from that singularly dedicated piece of tech than I do from Trackman

  3. desmond

    Sep 21, 2016 at 7:47 am

    Start with aiming a putter so it is aimed where you think you are aiming it – headshape, hosel, sightlines, and then go from there to weight, shaft, grip, counterbalancing.

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The Gear Dive: Aaron Dill is back!!!

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In this episode of TGD brought to you by Titleist, Johnny has a dear friend and master wedge human Aaron Dill to chat about Cantlay, The Masters, and his new TSi3.

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TG2: Testing the NEW Cobra King Tour irons and the Ben Hogan GS53 MAX driver

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Cobra’s new King Tour irons with MIM technology are built for better players looking to hit precision shots. The feel is very soft and responsive while the smaller profile lets you easily hit any shot in the book. Ben Hogan has released their most forgiving driver, the GS53 MAX and it is easy to hit. Designed with a ton of tech, this driver is long and helps reduce that slice!

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Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: Equipment tidbits for you to think about

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One of the most fun things about being a golfer is that we all want to get better–hit drives longer and straighter, iron shots that find greens more often, pitches and chips that get closer, and putts that go in more often. And we all seem to take great pleasure in finding that next “missing link” in our bags that will help us achieve one of those goals.

Today I want to share some thoughts about how little things can often mean a lot when it comes to tweaking your equipment. On the surface, a golf club seems to be a pretty simple thing—a piece of metal, at the end of a tubular piece of metal or graphite, with a rubber-like handle at the end. But when that golf club is put into motion at 100 mph or so, a lot of dynamics begin to happen.

As we ponder the dynamics of the complex action of swinging a golf club and the broad set of mechanics that come into play on every shot, I thought I’d share some random observations I’ve made over the years about equipment cause and effect:

Increasing your driving distance: The industry has taken us on this dramatic quest for distance and power, and the average driver sold today is over 45” long. That’s two inches longer than the standard of 25 years ago. And while the humongous driver heads brag about “forgiveness”, the fact is that your longest drives (and straightest) will always come from dead center hits. It’s still a fact that a sweet spot miss of just ½” will cost you 7-9% distance loss, and a miss of 3/4” will increase that to 12-15%. I suggest you try gripping down on your driver an inch or more the next time you play and see if you don’t hit the ball closer to the sweet spot and see it consistently going longer and straighter. It’s been proven over and over again.

Examining iron specs: The “standard” way a set of irons was engineered for decades was that the irons vary in length by ½”, and in loft by 4 degrees. But the past few years – driven by the relentless quest for distance – we have seen the loft gaps increased to 5° at the short end of the set and as small as 2.5° at the long end. The harsh reality of this geometry is that almost every golfer will have much smaller distance gaps at the long end of the set than at the short end, where distance precision is critical. I have tweaked my irons for years so that I have smaller length and lie differences at the short end than the long, and that allows my distance gaps to be more consistent. Most golfers could benefit from examining their TRUE carry distances from club to club and then tweaking lofts and lengths to fix their gapping.

Fit your putter. It amazes me to watch how many golfers–even some of the pros on TV–and see the toe of the putter up in the air at address. Simple fact is that this makes the face point left because of the loft. I’ve become a true believer in putter fitting. A good fit will ensure that your putter really is aimed at the target, and that the lie angle allows the ball to come off the putter straight. Yes, the style of putter is a matter of personal preference, but a putter that is accurately fit to you makes this maddening part of the game much less so.

Watch your grips. We spend hundreds of dollars on a driver or set of irons, and we get disposable “handles”. It’s a fact that grips wear out. They get dirty. And they need replacing regularly. Take a close look at yours. Worn, dirty grips cause you to grip the club tighter to have control. And bad shots are much more frequent because of that.

Experiment. The toys are a big part of the fun of golf, so don’t be afraid to experiment. I’ve long suggested all golfers should try the blade style short irons of one of your better player friends or pros, but experiment with other clubs, too. Hit your buddies’ hybrids, fairways, irons, drivers. Try different golf balls. [But I just can’t buy that tees can make a difference, sorry.] It’s fun.

So, there you have some random thoughts of the hundreds that swirl around in my head. Let me know your other questions about equipment, and I’ll try to address them in future columns.

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