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In this video, I compare the driver swing of Jason Day and Dustin Johnson, two of the longest and most accomplished golfers in the world. I did this analysis at the request of my readers, as well as to show that there are many, many ways to swing a golf club effectively, even at the world-class level.

For more about me and how I teach, visit www.dennisclarkgolf.com or go to my Facebook Page

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Dennis Clark is a PGA Master Professional. Clark has taught the game of golf for more than 30 years to golfers all across the country, and is recognized as one of the leading teachers in the country by all the major golf publications. He is also is a seven-time PGA award winner who has earned the following distinctions: -- Teacher of the Year, Philadelphia Section PGA -- Teacher of the Year, Golfers Journal -- Top Teacher in Pennsylvania, Golf Magazine -- Top Teacher in Mid Atlantic Region, Golf Digest -- Earned PGA Advanced Specialty certification in Teaching/Coaching Golf -- Achieved Master Professional Status (held by less than 2 percent of PGA members) -- PGA Merchandiser of the Year, Tri State Section PGA -- Golf Professional of the Year, Tri State Section PGA -- Presidents Plaque Award for Promotion and Growth of the Game of Golf -- Junior Golf Leader, Tri State section PGA -- Served on Tri State PGA Board of Directors. Clark is also former Director of Golf and Instruction at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort. Dennis now teaches at Bobby Clampett's Impact Zone Golf Indoor Performance Center in Naples, FL. .

17 Comments

17 Comments

  1. Dennis Clark

    Jul 1, 2016 at 1:09 pm

    and blessed genetics!

  2. Phil Underhill

    Jul 1, 2016 at 7:30 am

    It’s incredible how long DJ keeps the clubface square past impact, in fact it appears that the club is more open 12″ past the ball !!

    It makes sense that this should happen given how shut he is at the top, and in fact generally seems like a logical way to swing

    • dennis clark

      Jul 1, 2016 at 8:54 am

      I think it good if you’re in the super high speed athletic mode as is his case. Not sure that has sufficient power for most though.

      • Phil Underhill

        Jul 1, 2016 at 9:10 am

        see what you mean, his length is due to the fact he’s 6’5″, athletic and has about 110º shoulder turn. could be potentially longer but maybe less straight

        take away the height and shoulder turn and you’re at Zach Johnson clubhead speed, and he’s in better shape than most!

    • bc

      Jul 1, 2016 at 1:31 pm

      Well he has to shut at the top because he wants to come into it with the face closed to target so he can his his busting cut and hold it off like that

  3. Dennis Clark

    Jun 30, 2016 at 2:22 pm

    The thing that goes unnoticed about DJ is the amount RIGHT WRIST cup he gets (and keeps) as a result of that left wrist flexion.

  4. Dennis Clark

    Jun 30, 2016 at 9:10 am

    long, lanky, supple, strong etc. not a lifetime swing IMO…

    • Canadian Smizzle

      Jun 30, 2016 at 10:10 am

      Uh oh. I am certainly leaning towards the dj model a fair bit. And wow did i ever pick up club head speed. I was around 97 and my fastest swing is 122 on a flightscope. 118 average. I hooked it at first but i recently figured out how to move the ball both ways again. But it is real hard to move the ball less left and right swinging that fast. 97 mph i could shape both ways.

  5. Jim

    Jun 29, 2016 at 5:54 pm

    As said, both super athletes, chances are they both would be just as good had they had learned from someone other then who they did…..it is called talent, hand eye coordination if you will. To much time is spent trying to explains why these guys and gals on tour are so good…it is simple, they just are that good.

    • dennis clark

      Jun 29, 2016 at 6:21 pm

      True Jim..the point of the analysis is how there are many ways that the great athletes accomplish what they do. Very different techniques from two world class athletes!

  6. Bob Pegram

    Jun 29, 2016 at 2:43 pm

    As you point out, Dustin Johnson is very shut at the top due to his bowed left wrist. But his left wrist is not bowed at impact. My guess is that he is very loose jointed and that was a way when he was a kid to keep from leaving the face way open and hitting it dead right. That is an easy mistake to make for people who are loose jointed including loose wrists, especially a skinny kid.

    • Dennis Clark

      Jun 29, 2016 at 3:24 pm

      somebody was smart enough to leave him alone…thank goodness. Someone had tried to “fix” that club face, we may have never heard of DJ…

      • Edley

        Jun 29, 2016 at 5:42 pm

        We would have, but probably as an athlete in a different sport.

        • Steve

          Jun 29, 2016 at 6:56 pm

          Not likely

        • Brian

          Jul 1, 2016 at 8:43 am

          In which sport? He was a good HS basketball player but he’s “only” 6’4″. That’s on the smallish side in the NBA except for guards, and DJ wasn’t a guard. He might be an athletic freak by golf’s standards, but he’s quite pedestrian by even NCAA basketball standards.

      • beejaybee

        Jul 1, 2016 at 12:17 pm

        Credit to Allen Terrell – CCU Golf Coach

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Club Junkie

Club Junkie: Reviewing KBS PGI iron shafts and an updated what’s in the bag!

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The PGI graphite iron shaft is new from KBS and it is a great playable option for any player. The PGI comes in multiple weights and launches mid/high for soft landing shots into the green. Easy to square up and hit straight, even in the heavier weights. Finally, it is time for an updated WITB since a few things have changed over the summer.

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Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: Lessons from the round of a lifetime

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To all of us “senior golfers,” the notion of shooting our age is one that carries great appeal. It answers the burning question:

“Can I keep my skills sharp enough to withstand the hands of time?”

Earlier this year, I had made the proclamation to my golf buddies that my goal was to shoot my age before I turned 70 next March. That meant I needed to work on my game a little more, given that I had let my handicap slip up to 5 at the time. Over the past few months, I’ve brought that down to 2.5. My ball-striking has been solid, but have struggled with the greens at my new club since moving to a great little coastal town of Rockport, Texas. And I lose my mental focus too many times in each round.

So, I hope you don’t mind me sharing with you this week that Sunday was the most glorious round of golf I’ve played since my 20s. Not only did I shoot my age, but I shattered that goal with a six-birdie, no-bogey 65 – a round of golf that was remarkably “easy” as I experienced it and as I look back on it.

And of course, being the analytical type that I am, I have spent time reflecting on just what happened to allow me to shoot the lowest score I’ve carded in over 40 years. I believe I have come to understand what caused the “magic” and want to share that with you this week. Maybe these tips can help some of you to a career round soon.

  1. One of my favorite movie lines comes from Mel Gibson in The Patriot, when he tells his young sons “aim small, miss small.” Because I had a guest who hadn’t played this course before, I was giving him very specific target lines off the tee. Instead of “the left side of the fairway,” I was pointing out “those two trees that make a ‘y,’” “that child’s playset in the back yard straight away.” And that made me focus on smaller targets, too. Sometimes, we can forget those things we know. Aim small, miss small.
  2. A new flatstick. Well, new to me anyway. I had not been putting very well, so I went to the bullpen and drew out one of my personal favorite putter designs. It’s a little Bullseye-inspired brass blade with some technology weighting; I designed it in the early 1990s for Ben Hogan, who marketed it as the Sure-In 1. The point is, sometimes a fresh look gives your putting new life.
  3. Stay in the moment. With every shot, I found myself more focused because of the guidance I was giving my friend, and that allowed me to stay more focused on each shot’s execution. I don’t recall any shot where my mind wandered.
  4. “See it. Feel it. Trust it.” Another line from a great golf book and movie, Golf’s Sacred Journey – Seven Days in Utopia. Robert Duvall’s Johnny character extolls our hero to do just that with every shot. And that’s what I was doing. Seeing the shot, feeling that I’ve hit it many times before, and trusting that I could do it again.

Thank you all for indulging me in telling my story of shooting my age. I’m sure this isn’t my “new normal,” but it was certainly lightning in a bottle for an afternoon. And as we all should from every good shot or good hole, or good round, I’m going to carry that feeling with me the best I can for as long as I can.

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Golf's Perfect Imperfections

Golf’s Perfect Imperfections: A new way to line up your driver for center ball contact

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Fine-tune your driver and tighten up your impact and your dispersion with these awesome references.

 

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