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In the video above, I put Titleist’s new 716 MB, CB, AP2 and AP1 irons to the test to see how they measure up against each other on Foresight’s GC2 launch monitor.

Do you own a set of Titleist irons? Thinking of upgrading to the new line? Let me know your thoughts on the video and the irons in the comments section below.

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Mark Crossfield has been coaching golf for more than 20 years, and has enjoyed shaping the digital golf world with fresh, original and educated videos. Basically, I am that guy from YouTube. You can connect with Mark on Periscope (4golfonline) and Snapchat (AskGolfGuru), as well through the social media accounts linked below.

5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Justin

    Jun 25, 2016 at 8:55 pm

    All 6 iron lofts:
    AP1: 28*
    AP2: 30*
    CB: 31*
    MB: 31*

    Explains the slight difference in backspin. Now, if only it could be explained why the most “user friendly” design has more sidespin than the least “user friendly” design… Oh, wait-everything about golf clubs is “YMMV”.

    Find something you like, that you can afford, and get it fitted. That’s pretty much all their is to it.

  2. Jack

    Jun 24, 2016 at 3:31 am

    Great video Mark. And in other news if you put a good swing on it, any club will perform well.

  3. Nflm

    Jun 23, 2016 at 6:38 pm

    Nothing feels like your Mizunos though, eh, Mark?

  4. CL

    Jun 23, 2016 at 4:08 pm

    Thanks Mark! Anyway to get your hands on the T-MB’s and see how it compares as well?

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Podcasts

The 19th Hole Episode 170: Grassroots golf and Darius Rucker

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Host Michael Williams talks about the benefits of grassroots golf programs in growing the game. Also features a reboot of his exclusive interview with Hootie and the Blowfish.

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Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: Have a ‘Plan B’

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One of the things that I think is very interesting and fun about this game is that there are a number of ways to play every hole you encounter. And sometimes a hole offers “better” ways to play it than you might think. Let me explain with a couple of experiences from my own golf life.

ONE. In my thirties and forties, I played at a club outside of San Antonio – Fair Oaks Ranch. The 18th hole was a tough par 4 with a very small landing area and a gaping bunker at about 175 out. The skinny fairway left of that bunker wasn’t more than 15 yards wide, and there was a little mott of trees on the green side of the bunker that you would have to carry with your mid-iron bunker approach. Tough, to say the least.

That hole drove most of us nuts, and double bogeys were more common than birdies, for sure. Par was always a great score and bogey wasn’t “bad” at all.

So, one day it hit me that if I hit 4-wood off the tee, I would have an elevated fairway look at the green from about 200-210, giving me another soft 4-wood or 3-iron to the green, and the fairway was about 40 yards wide back there. Being a good long club player, I began to play the hole that way. Doubles disappeared entirely, pars became the norm and I even made the occasional birdie. Hmm.

TWO. At my recent club, the ninth hole just didn’t fit my eye or my game. I play a fade off the tee most of the time and turning over a draw was just not reliable for me at the time. That ninth is a dogleg left, with a bunker on the right side of the fairway that runs from about 160-125 from the green, right where the prime driving area is. What makes this hole so tough for me is that the prevailing wind is left to right, and trees just 60-100 yards off the tee keep me from starting the ball out left and letting it ride the breeze. This is another one where birdies are rare for me there, and bogies and doubles way too frequent. So, it dawned on me one day, finally, that I could hit 4-wood right at that bunker and not get to it, leaving me a 5- or 6-iron into the green, rather than the short iron the rare proper drive would leave me. So, that became my new strategy on that hole. I’m a good mid-iron player, so I’m fine with that, and that damn fairway bunker never caught me again.

THREE. My new club puts a premium on accurate wedge play. Most of the shorter holes have the smallest greens I’ve ever seen, so distance control with your wedge approaches is critical. And I find that reasonably full-swing wedges are easier to control distance than those awkward 60- to 80-yard partial swings. So, I’ve learned to put a premium on club selection off the tee on those holes to leave my approach shots in the 85-115 range, so that I can “dial in” my approach shotmaking.

My point in all this is that sometimes a hole gets under your skin or just doesn’t set up well for your game. When that happens, design yourself a Plan ‘B,’ and change the way you play it, at least for a while. Quite often you will find a solution to a problem and your scores and attitude will improve.

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Club Junkie

Club Junkie: Mizuno T-22 wedge and Cuater Moneymaker shoes review!

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Mizuno’s new T-22 wedges are forged from the same 1025 carbon steel with boron as the irons, giving them an extremely soft feel. Very versatile, the sole grinds allow for hitting any shot your heart desires.

The Cuater Moneymaker shoes might be some of the most comfortable I have worn in years. Tons of cushioning, exceptional traction all over the course, and they are even waterproof!

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