Connect with us

Equipment

Review: Ben Hogan Ft. Worth 15 irons vs. Hogan irons of old

Published

on

Hogan irons

The Ben Hogan Company returned to the golf equipment business with the introduction of its Ft. Worth irons in January. We detailed the release at the time, and a bevy of reviews have populated the internet in the time since.

Let’s recap the Ft. Worth marketing literature and features.

The Ft. Worths (and TK Wedge) come in 44 loft options from 20 to 63 degrees. While it may take some getting used to, the company’s slogan, “precision is back,” is driven home by the arrangement.

The irons are forged from 1025 carbon steel and feature the V Sole design developed by company CEO Terry Koehler, which maximizes playability from any lie, according to the company, thanks to a high-bounce leading edge and lower-bounce sole.

Also visually apparent and a centerpiece feature of the irons: perimeter weighting.

Again, we wondered how the new Hogans would stack up against some of the great Hogan irons from the past 50 years. Further, we wondered how those irons compared to one another. How would, say, the Power Thrust iron of the early 60s compare to the 1999 Apex?

7

(L-R) Irons 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 listed below

The irons we tested

  1. Power Thrust (1962)
  2. Apex II (1979)
  3. Apex Redline (1988)
  4. Apex (1999)
  5. Ft Worth
3

From the Power Thrust (1962) to the Ft Worth (2015)

The lengths, lie, lofts were all within a degree of each other (30-31), standard length (37.50 inches – with the Power Thrust, despite being a 5 iron, 0.5-inches shorter) and standard lie of 60 degrees on all.

In our testing, conducted on an outdoor driving range with 5-10 mph of wind and using a TrackMan to record the data, the Ft. Worth irons were longer, generally higher flying, generally more precise, and at least as efficient as any other Hogan iron in terms of smash factor.

Conducting the testing, your intrepid writer and a pair of Class A PGA pros.

Screen Shot 2015-09-03 at 4.07.49 PMDispersion graphics

Screen Shot 2015-08-31 at 5.45.07 PM

David’s dispersion

Screen Shot 2015-08-31 at 5.44.47 PM

Jeff’s dispersion

Screen Shot 2015-08-31 at 5.44.36 PM

Ben’s dispersion

The Hogan Company also did its own testing using 15 golfers with club speeds from the mid-70s to the mid-90s. In all of the company’s tests, the Ft. Worth was either the longest or second-longest club.

For the single-digit handicapper, the club represents a modest improvement over the previous iron models. For the mid-handicapper, however, it’s a playable forged iron, as the data indicates.

4

The Ft. Worth possessed a more solid feeling strike and a significant amount of feedback, all while performing better than expected on off-center hits. Enthusiasts will definitely see and feel the similarities between the Ft. Worths and the most recent Hogan Apex. However, they’ll also likely see better performance on the launch monitor and plenty of workability on course.

The player will certainly feel any misses, but won’t get the hand-numbing sting of older blades. Good, solid sound, and soft feel on center strikes. Great turf interaction, especially on steeper swings (thanks V Sole).

5

There’s no doubt these clubs mark a step forward for the Hogan Company and open cast a wider net for potential players.

A forged blade iron may be a difficult sell in an environment where the best golfers in the world are playing multi-material clubs. However, if you’re a purist and/or a Hogan disciple, don’t hesitate to go through the HoganFit process.

[wrx_retail_links productid=”22″]

Your Reaction?
  • 219
  • LEGIT32
  • WOW24
  • LOL7
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP4
  • OB5
  • SHANK19

30 Comments

30 Comments

  1. iSeeClearly

    May 22, 2018 at 12:28 am

    “…an environment where the best golfers in the world are playing multi-material clubs.”
    …or an environment where the best golfers in the world are selling multi-material clubs. Ya think??!!!

  2. Panther73

    Sep 9, 2016 at 6:31 pm

    I would really like to find my first Hogan set, Apex II, Apex 5 shaft, 2-Pw Black filled Cameo. The one thing to change would be CC grooves, the original sets were V grooves, Hogan Balata balls had super thin covers. Same thing now with ball covers softer to match up with current groove regulations. Any ideas? Fly to Japan to Miura and recreate them?

  3. Billy Bondaruk

    Jan 15, 2016 at 9:39 pm

    I first played Hogan Irons in the 70’s in High School and jr. Golf. My dad was a state am champ and he played them… Every few years we would get a new set and I’d take his, until the apex set cam put….. We both played them and I had a great year playing so did he….. Last year I went the PGA Show, with out my Dad… He’s gone now….. But the feeling of hitting a Ben Hogan iron…. That Hogan Apex iron the one we bothe bought that year back in the 1980’s…. I found it at last years show, but it was better…. Much better and it was a shock that that was even possible. Couple that with the history and the hero that you loved thru life, his stories and jokes…. What the man stood up for in this game….. I bought two sets. The 21 degree iron my friends call it the sniper rifle. I have never had an easier 3 iron to hit….. You fell the speed off the face. Carve it anyway you want. And the tradition to keep lofts at least close to what they should be….. Com om Man…… Hogan was the a man that changed golf

  4. Dave

    Oct 20, 2015 at 2:44 am

    My first full set of irons was a used set of apex irons, with some powerbilt persimmons, some 30+ yrs ago. Looked great but not very forgiving. Still to this day at address, I like the look of a straight sole line and not too thick a top line.

  5. Peter Whitford

    Oct 8, 2015 at 2:35 pm

    I played Hogan Apex’s with a # 4 Hogan shaft–loved those blades. I had them refinished and restored 3 times–they finally wore out unfortunately. I am interested in these but they don’t have any shaft options to speak of. I now play Titleist 710 MB’s with a Project X 5.5 Shaft–I would switch to these in a heartbeat if they could put a decent shaft in them–KBS isn’t that great a shaft.

    • JP Sourdellia

      Oct 14, 2015 at 12:41 pm

      Peter – You can order your Ft. Worth 15 irons with the Project X 5.5 shaft, if that’s your preference. We offer a wide selection of custom shafts and I’m sure we can accommodate your needs. Please call our customer service line to speak with one of our experts. 844-53-HOGAN(46426)

  6. Walt Pendleton

    Oct 6, 2015 at 3:06 pm

    I have just three words to say about the new Hogan irons I just bought…smallest dispersion ratio! It’s all about the misses, gentlemen! We all create them.

  7. Mark

    Oct 5, 2015 at 8:52 pm

    Regardless of outcome, that is a timeless lineup. Pure class.

  8. Brian K

    Oct 5, 2015 at 2:52 pm

    Did each iron have the original stock shaft or reloaded with the same shaft? Wouldn’t the original shafts in power thrust, Apex II and Apex 88 be too worn and degraded to make and accurate comparsion?

  9. Carlos Danger

    Oct 5, 2015 at 11:12 am

    I have a set of the 89 Apex sitting in my office looking clean and pretty. I grew up with them and have always wished Hogan would make a comeback…so needless to say I was pretty excited to see the Ft Worth come out. I love the website process of building them out and of course they look beautiful.

    However, I think I will wait to order them until a cavity back or slightly larger iron head is released. At this point in my life, trying to hit a 4 iron blade is just not all that enticing. Im currently playing Adams CMBs (which are not terribly far off from a blade) so if Hogan releases something slightly bigger I dont think I could stop myself from ordering a mixed set.

    • John C

      Oct 5, 2015 at 9:54 pm

      You like Hogan.. Just get the Lofts that are 6 Iron and down.. Worth it.. Why wait if Hogan is your favorite..

      • Carlos Danger

        Oct 6, 2015 at 9:25 am

        to be clear…the thought of beautiful Hogan blades in my bag is my favorite. the reality of trying to hit a blade 4 iron consistently is another thing.

        Im sure they will expand and make a slightly bigger iron, by then I will be due for some new ones:)

  10. rex235

    Oct 5, 2015 at 3:09 am

    RH ONLY.

  11. barf

    Oct 4, 2015 at 12:55 pm

    Were the shafts standardized for this test? The shafts alone in the older clubs make the comparison lopsided.

  12. Jamie

    Oct 3, 2015 at 11:14 am

    You can really see the influence of SCOR clubs. I guess same owners!

  13. mhendon

    Oct 3, 2015 at 10:25 am

    I got to say that’s an extreme release cycle there. 17 years followed by 11 and 11

  14. birly-shirly

    Oct 2, 2015 at 6:04 pm

    Kudos for carrying out the test, but does it really mean anything? Ignore the scatter graphics, and what is the data saying?
    Smash factor – 2 out of 3 testers saw no advantage to the new club.
    Spin – 2 out of 3 testers got more spin from older clubs.
    Height – 2 out of 3 testers hit older clubs higher.
    Landing angle – all 3 testers had older clubs landing steeper.
    I’m not saying that proves the older clubs are better. I am asking what conclusions can you really draw from this? Is this a test of how the clubs perform, or the swings the testers made?

    • billm311

      Oct 4, 2015 at 8:02 pm

      I currently play with Hogan anniversary blades, dynamic gold shafts. I used the hogan demo pack to test the new irons head to head with mine. Though the lofts were not exact matches, the biggest difference for me was shaft used. I’d like to try them again with matching shaft and length of shaft. In the end, I did really enjoy the new club. Very clean look, slightly thicker and rounder than my current blades, but produced very nice results.

      In the end, I did not make the switch. My clubs are custom fit, so they feel perfect to me. A little extra forgiveness would be nice – for that reason, I am considering getting just 4, maybe 5 iron replacements with slightly different loft spacing.

      Well designed club if you are looking at forged blades, just make sure to get the right shaft for you!

      • HR

        Oct 5, 2015 at 12:45 am

        Well at $149 per club, it ain’t cheap. With no custom shaft options, it’s highway robbery

        • JP Sourdellia

          Oct 14, 2015 at 12:45 pm

          HR – We do offer a large selection of custom shafts. You can call one of our experts at 844-53-HOGAN(46426) to discuss what shaft options we offer. I’m sure we can accommodate your needs.

  15. cbails00

    Oct 2, 2015 at 5:25 pm

    I think this is a fantastic exercise and cool to see how Hogan compares to Hogan. I would be curious how the new Hogan Ft. Worth 15 irons would stand up in a similar test against the new multi-material irons – 716 AP2, new Apex Pro’s, TM PSi, Ping i Series etc. If the results were good for the Ft. Worth 15’s it might make them more appealing to purchase.

  16. Bogeypro

    Oct 2, 2015 at 5:19 pm

    I just feel that it is completely confusing to not put an iron number. I don’t want to have to remember the loft. Just say, 6 iron, not 31 or whatever it is…

  17. michael

    Oct 2, 2015 at 4:19 pm

    I play the apex ii plus and I love them had the lofts tweaked a bit due to my slower swing speed but they feel great. Love the feel of forged irons.

  18. Joe

    Oct 2, 2015 at 3:22 pm

    I play the Hogan Apex 1999 model, love them. Also, am selling a refinished Hogan Apex 1999 model in the classified.

    I much refer these to the current Apex by Callaway.

  19. RB

    Oct 2, 2015 at 1:37 pm

    The spreadsheet descriptions for the irons should match the descriptions at the start of the review. And in the same order. It’s quite confusing which Apex is which. Consistency would help.

    • Cliff

      Oct 2, 2015 at 3:17 pm

      it’s not THAT difficult to follow!

    • Rich

      Oct 2, 2015 at 9:28 pm

      I agree it should be more consistent at a glance. If you take a few minutes, you can figure out which one is which. Not very well done though in regards to ease of understanding.

  20. BS

    Oct 2, 2015 at 12:25 pm

    I see no similarities at all. That is BS

  21. Craigar

    Oct 2, 2015 at 11:51 am

    Just out of curiosity what were the differences in shafts as far as frequency?

  22. TR1PTIK

    Oct 2, 2015 at 11:22 am

    I learned how to play golf with an old set of blades, and prefer a more classic looking club despite my higher handicap. I’d love to give these irons a try sometime.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Whats in the Bag

Jon Rahm WITB (October 2020)

Published

on

Driver: TaylorMade SIM (10.5 @10 degrees)
Shaft: Aldila Tour Green 75 TX

jon-rahm-witb-2020 jon-rahm-witb-2020

3-wood: TaylorMade SIM (15 @14.5 degrees)
Shaft: Aldila Tour Green 75 TX

jon-rahm-witb-2020Utility iron: TaylorMade RSI TP UDI (4)
Shaft: Project X Rifle 6.5

Irons: TaylorMade P750 (4-PW)
Shafts: Project X Rifle 6.5

Wedges: TaylorMade MG Hi-Toe (52-09), TaylorMade MG2 (56-12SB, 60-11)
Shafts: Project X Rifle 6.5

Putter: TaylorMade Spider X (Chalk)

Grips: Golf Pride MCC

Ball: TaylorMade TP5 (#10)

Your Reaction?
  • 14
  • LEGIT1
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB0
  • SHANK1

Continue Reading

Equipment

The most popular golf shoes on Amazon right now (Fall 2020 edition)

Published

on

What are the most popular golf shoes on Amazon right now? From time to time, we like to get out of our little bubble of OEM releases and what’s being played on tour to look at what golf consumers are buying on one of the largest online retail marketplaces: Amazon.

Here are some of the best-selling golf shoes on Amazon as of October 2020.

1. Adidas Men’s Tech Response Golf Shoes

From the listing:Mesh/synthetic. Imported. Synthetic sole. Thintech, adituff, thintech cleat, traxion, adiwear. Lightweight mesh and synthetic upper for enhanced breathability and comfort. Soft eva insole for lightweight comfort and cushioning. 6-spike configuration with thintech low-profile technology for improved traction and stability.”

Price: $59.99

Buy here.

2. Skechers Go Golf Men’s Torque Waterproof Golf Shoe

From the listing:Synthetic. Imported. lace-up. Rubber sole. Shaft measures approximately mid-top from arch. Replaceable soft spikes. Waterproof.”

Price: $59.99

Buy here.

3. FootJoy Men’s Fj Flex Golf Shoes

 

From the listing:100% Textile. Imported. Synthetic sole. Shaft measures approximately mid-top from arch. Performance Mesh – lightweight performance mesh delivers incredible comfort, breathability and all-day comfort. Complete support – a soft EVA midsole provides increased underfoot cushioning, enhanced comfort and exceptional stability.”

Price: $89.99

Buy here.

4. PUMA Men’s Ignite Nxt Lace Golf Shoe

From the listing:100% Textile and Synthetic. Imported. Synthetic sole. Shaft measures approximately low-top from arch. Sole shield. Performance Mesh +TPU. Ignite Foam.”

Price: $99.99

Buy here.

5. Skechers GO GOLF Men’s Max Golf Shoe

From the listing:Imported. Rubber sole. Shaft measures approximately mid-top from arch. Skechers Goga Max insole delivers enhanced high-rebound cushioning for all day comfort. Durable grip tpu outsole with a spikeless bottom. Lightweight. Water resistant. Synthetic upper.”

Price: $74.97

Buy here.

6. Adidas Men’s Tour360 Xt Spikeless Golf Shoe

From the listing: Leather and Synthetic. Imported. Synthetic sole. Shaft measures approximately low-top from arch. Leather and microfiber synthetic upper. Spikeless Puremotion outsole for enhanced flexibility and grip with X-Traxion primary lugs for grip and balance.”

Price: $135.59

Buy here.

7. FootJoy Men’s Fj Originals Golf Shoes

From the listing: Built on the Austin Last, this last offers the fullest rounded toe character, fullest fit across forefoot, standard instep and heel. EVA (ethyl vinyl acetate) Fit-Beds provide lightweight cushioning underfoot. EVA does not take a set, so the cushioning will remain the same for the life of the shoe. This easy care synthetic upper offers outstanding 1 year waterproof comfort, breathability, and durability.”

Price: $89.95

Buy here.

8. Skechers Women’s Max Golf Shoe

From the listing:Imported. Rubber sole. Shaft measures approximately mid-top from arch. Spikeless, durable grip tpu outsole. Ultra-lightweight, responsive ULTRA Flight cushioning. Goga max insole delivers enhanced high-rebound cushioning. Water resistant. Synthetic upper.”

Price: $57.55

Buy here.

9. FootJoy Women’s Sport Retro-Previous Season Style Golf Shoes

From the listing: ” Lightweight – the linen-textured synthetic uppers offer lightweight comfort and durability. Cushioned rubber – the gum rubber outsole is a soft rubber compound which provides flexibility and comfort. Enhanced traction – This molded rubber outsole provides turf gripping performance and durability.”

Price: $59.95

Buy here.

10. New Balance Men’s Sweeper Waterproof Spiked Comfort Golf Shoe

From the listing: Synthetic. Imported.Rubber sole.Shaft measures approximately low-top from arch. Waterproof microfiber leather upper. REVlite 10mm drop* midsole provides lightweight cushioning & premium responsiveness. NDurance rubber outsole with removable FTS 3.0 Pulsar spikes.”

Price: $59.99

Buy here.

Your Reaction?
  • 11
  • LEGIT2
  • WOW3
  • LOL2
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB1
  • SHANK3

Continue Reading

Equipment

Justin Thomas: What makes him an elite wedge player

Published

on

It might be easy to say that a player like Justin Thomas is near the top of the leaderboard because

  1. He hits it the best
  2. He drives it long and relatively straight
  3. He is having a good putting week

I would agree and disagree with all three. Yes, they are definitely factors, but in my opinion, it’s his wedge play that has been the most notable part of his game—especially in 2020.

If you look at the stats, you will find a player who is not only damn-near deadly from 150 yards and in, but also a player who gets out of trouble about as well as anyone in the top 10 in the world.

We are talking about 2020 as a whole FYI.

(Stats via PGATour.com)

Now strokes gained wedge stats have multiple variables affecting the ultimate stat, fairways hit, where a player misses it, out of the rough vs out of the fairway, putting, yada, yada, yada….

At this point, if I had to pick a player to get it done around the greens it would JT or Jon Rahm. True artists. Go back and watch some of the shots from the FedEx at TPC Southwind or even Kapalua this year, it was the reliance on his wedges that became the secret sauce. Like the putter, good wedge play can be an equalizer when anything else is falling short. And when the rest of the bag is decent, for a player like JT, good wedge play equals wins.

I wanted to dig in a little deeper, so I asked my old friend, Vokey’s Aaron Dill a few questions on what makes JT unique with a wedge in his hands…

JW: As far as technique, what in his action makes JT so good? And if you could compare him to someone who would it be?

AD: Justin’s technique is really something to watch. His ability to stay loose, calm, and maintain effortless speed while delivering the wedge accurately really shows his comfort with a wedge in his hands. Justin keeps the club out in front of him and he has mastered the ability to control his golf ball’s flight and spin.  I could compare him to many, but I sometimes feel he is in a league of his own.  

JW: Beyond the great shots we see on highlight reels, where does JT really get it done from an SG perspective? What do you see that the average person wouldn’t? 

AD: Justin does it all very well. You know this because he is 9th in SG around the green and this is partly due to his spotless technique but his ability to scramble in difficult situations. Something he does that amazes me is his creative vision of shots. There are times when he is in a situation where he hits a shot we don’t expect or think of. His comfort with a wedge is fun to watch, he makes all short game shots seem like they are no big deal and you can see this by his free-flowing, loose and speedy wedge action. You can tell he feels at peace with his wedge technique.

JW: He has an interesting set up for his wedges that has been well covered, but since you first met him, how has his understanding and approach to his wedges and wedge play evolved?

AD: Justin’s wedge set is unique, however, a lot of thought and intelligence has gone into crafting this matrix. Since the first time I met him, he has worked hard and he has always had the desire to want to improve and push himself. You can see it in his strength training, his increase in ball speed, and his general approach to competitive golf. His knowledge of his short game has improved over the years and it shows in his success. You can see how comfortable he feels when a wedge is pulled from the bag, you can bet he will be landing the ball close to the hole setting himself up for a makable putt.

Justin Thomas’ wedge specs 

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design Raw SM7 (46-10F @47.5, 52-12F @52.5), Vokey SM8 (56-14F @57), Titleist Vokey Design WedgeWorks (60T @ 60.5)

Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100 (46), True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400 (52-60)

Your Reaction?
  • 36
  • LEGIT2
  • WOW2
  • LOL6
  • IDHT3
  • FLOP2
  • OB1
  • SHANK3

Continue Reading

WITB

Facebook

Trending