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Isometric golf exercises for more distance

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If you want to hit the golf ball farther and you’re willing to put in a bit of physical effort to achieve the desired results, then consider adding isometric exercises to your training program.

An isometric exercise is an exercise in which a muscle gets contracted but the joint doesn’t visibly move. For example, pushing your hands together as hard as you can will contract the muscles, but your joints don’t appear to move.

Isometrics have been around for many hundreds, and possibly thousands of years with historical application in activities like yoga and oriental martial arts.

Because isometrics do not need much in the way of equipment and can work with just your own body weight, they are relatively safe to perform and are often used in physiotherapy and for injury rehab.

Personally, I first remember learning about isometric exercises when I was studying Bruce Lee’s training regimes in an effort to find things that would help with hitting the golf ball farther.

As it turns out, they’re wonderful for golf. 

The power equation has both a speed and strength component to it. To get more powerful, you either need to get faster, get stronger, or ideally both.

  • Power = Force x Distance / Time

The most important place to be strong in your golf swing is in the down swing because everyone, whether you are senior lady or world long drive champion, starts at 0 mph at the top of the backswing and gets to whatever speed they achieve at impact.

Using resistance band isometrics, you can work on developing your downswing muscle strength.

One convenient thing about using bands is they don’t really take up much space and they travel well. This is excellent for a tour player, for someone who travels frequently, and/or for a person who doesn’t want to take up too much storage space. In particular, I like the bands at Swing Man Golf because they also interchange and combine easily, they are numbered to track progress, and they won’t snap from stretching them too far.

Use the fitness routine below to strengthen your golf body.

Isometrics weekly fitness routine 

1) Take your resistance bands, go to the top of your back swing, and hold as much resistance in place as you can for 8-10 seconds.

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2) Adjust the position of the bands and repeat this for your “half way down” position.

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3) Then move the bands and hold again at your impact position.

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4) Lastly, repeat all three of these positions… but with rear hand only, and then lead hand only.

Make sure to complete all three positions using two hands, rear hand only, and lead hand only because you’ll feel it in different places. Two hands challenges your core, rear hand works the “throwing/pushing” part of the swing, and lead hand hits your “pulling” muscles.

Perform 1-2 sets twice per week, making sure that you maintain as much resistance as possible, and add resistance whenever you can.

Doing isometrics in this manner for your golf swing is great in that it focuses on developing maximum controlled exertion for a short amount of time.

Combined with regularly practicing swinging fast using a radar device for feedback, over the course of several weeks you’ll increase the strength of your downswing and ultimately hit the ball farther.

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Jaacob Bowden is a Professional Golfer, PGA of America Class A Member, Top 100 Most Popular Teacher, Swing Speed Trainer, the original founder of Swing Man Golf, the creator of Sterling Irons® single length irons, and has caddied on the PGA TOUR and PGA TOUR CHAMPIONS. Two of his articles for GolfWRX are the two most viewed of all time. Formerly an average-length hitting 14-handicap computer engineer, Jaacob quit his job, took his savings and moved from Kansas to California to pursue a golf career at age 27. He has since won the Pinnacle Distance Challenge with a televised 381-yard drive, won multiple qualifiers for the World Long Drive Championships including a 421-yard grid record drive, made cuts in numerous tournaments around the world with rounds in the 60s and 70s, and finished fifth at the Speed Golf World Championships at Bandon Dunes. Jaacob also shot the championship record for golf score with a 72 in 55 minutes and 42 seconds using only 6 clubs. The Swing Man Golf website has helped millions of golfers and focuses primarily on swing speed training. Typically, Jaacob’s amateur golfers and tour players pick up 12-16 mph of driver swing speed in the first 30 days of basic speed training. You can learn more about Jaacob, Swing Man Golf, and Sterling Irons® here: Websites – JaacobBowden.com & SwingManGolf.com & SterlingIrons.com; Twitter - @JaacobBowden & @SwingManGolf & @SterlingIrons; Facebook – Facebook.com/JaacobBowdenGolf & Facebook.com/SwingManGolf & <Facebook.com/SterlingIronsGolf; Instagram - Instagram.com/JaacobBowden YouTube – YouTube.com/SwingManGolf – Millions of views!!!

21 Comments

21 Comments

  1. Pingback: 6 Exercises To Hit The Ball Longer - www.meditationdaily.com

  2. Pingback: 6 Exercises To Hit The Ball Longer

  3. Steve

    Aug 20, 2015 at 9:26 am

    Thanks for a great article

    Where can I buy the resistance bands you use?
    I have not seen any with rings at the end or the handle that simulates a golf club grip.

    • Jaacob Bowden

      Sep 2, 2015 at 2:17 pm

      Hi Steve,

      Go to the Swing Man Golf website. We’ve got them there.

      I specifically like those because they won’t snap, they have the clips for easy changing and stacking, they are numbered for tracking progress, they have good grip accessories that accommodate a lot of variability for positioning, they travel and pack up well, and with they have good anchors which allow you to use them in doors at home, in hotels, around trees or posts, etc.

      Jaacob

  4. Dlygrisse

    Aug 11, 2015 at 6:17 pm

    Did some of these the last two days, could really feel it in my core/abs! I am hoping that is what I should feel?

    • Jaacob Bowden

      Aug 13, 2015 at 11:46 pm

      Hi Dlygrisse,

      Different people feel it in different places but core/abs is a common place, yes!

      Jaacob

  5. Private

    Aug 6, 2015 at 11:40 am

    I’m curious as to how much strength training would actually benefit me. I’m 5’6 160 with 112SS. I just don’t see how I could get much more out of myself.

    • adam

      Aug 7, 2015 at 7:53 am

      Two words for you: Jamie Sadlowski

      • Jaacob Bowden

        Aug 7, 2015 at 1:19 pm

        Adam is right.

        Jamie is a good example of someone who is under 6’0″ and 200 lbs (listed at 5’11” and 170) who can swing very fast (I believe 150 mph on a Trackman is his fastest in competition).

        I can’t think of specific names but I’ve also observed a number of other long drive guys who are also not “big or tall” who can bring it from a club head speed standpoint.

        So although you are already fast by general golf standards, you could always improve with more swing speed and strength training.

        Set a goal, be dedicated, put in the work, adjust as necessary, believe in yourself, and the sky is the limit!

  6. Mike

    Aug 6, 2015 at 8:45 am

    Hi Jaacob, thanks for taking the time to write this article but I’m not sure I agree with you 100%. Yes isometrics have been around for a long time and yes we use them in injury rehabilitation but I don’t think they are the best option for increasing strength. In rehab I use isometrics as a means to prevent atrophy of a muscle when resistance training through a full range of motion would potentially make the injury worse. With isometrics, strength gains are limited primarily to the angle at which the joint is exercised.
    Even if you take the power equation P = F x D / T with isometrics you are by definition not covering a distance, the joint is in a static position. So when D = 0 it doesn’t matter the amount of force you apply or time you apply it, P = 0. You are not creating power.
    I don’t doubt that your program is effective, I just don’t believe isometric training would be beneficial to a healthy individual looking to increase their distance off the tee. They should focus more on a progressive resistance program that incorporates concentric and eccentric movements throughout the entire range of motion.
    Mike, ATC, EP-C

    • Jaacob Bowden

      Aug 6, 2015 at 9:06 am

      Hi Mike,

      Thanks for the comment.

      You are correct in that with isometrics the force is high but power is zero. But I was referring to power in the sense of the golf swing…in that the golf swing power goes up if you make your golf swing stronger and faster.

      I also agree that isometrics aren’t the “best” option for increasing strength. Were someone to be going for maximum speed gains, as you mentioned I would similarly incorporate other things like concentric and eccentric movements and more.

      Isometrics are nice as a supplement, though…even to healthy and already fit individuals (which can include tour players and professional long drivers).

      That being said, even if isometrics were the only thing you were using to work on golf swing strength, it’s better than nothing. Most golfers don’t work on their speed at all, even “fit” ones. So when you actually get them to work at it a bit and then throw something as simple as some band isometrics at them for their down swing, you can get a nice useable swing speed bump over the course of several weeks of training.

      Jaacob

      • Mike

        Aug 6, 2015 at 9:32 am

        Right on, I agree something is better than nothing. Not only for performance gains but also injury prevention and longevity!

  7. Todd Marsh Fitness

    Aug 6, 2015 at 7:43 am

    Great exercises Jaacob, I like these as the muscles you use in the swing work against the resistance but you aren’t doing all the rotation that would would do in med ball throws or Russian twists. It has been my experience that when a person gets tired doing the latter exercises they start to rotate more in the lumbar region that thoracic region.
    Good point on doing the work with both lead and trailing hand as they do work more muscles.
    I will add these to my anti-rotational exercises.
    Do you think holding the positions in the follow-through position will help with de-accelerating the club?

    • Jaacob Bowden

      Aug 6, 2015 at 9:18 am

      Hi Todd,

      I’ve never used band isometrics to work specifically on deceleration. I suppose that could work, though. I think you would have to get in to your follow through positions and then set the bands up so that you are working the opposite direction of your swing, if that makes sense.

      An alternative thing you can do with bands to work on deceleration is setting the band position up high, pulling the bands down backwards to impact, and then using them to accelerate in to the finish. In that way, the bands can help pull you along faster than you otherwise would be going and your body would have to deal with slowing down and stopping the extra speed.

      But that’s for another article. This one was just about a simple thing you can do to work on your down swing strength. :-p

      Jaacob

  8. other paul

    Aug 6, 2015 at 12:08 am

    I gained 8 MPH with Jaacob’s training in 2 months. I gained 10 more with technique change a few months later. How ever, I thought I signed up for 1 month of Jaacob’s stuff and I didn’t realize that I had to cancel it. So it kept pulling from my account for 6 months. Wife almost shot me for that. I didn’t even look at his stuff for 5 of those months… But it was my fault.

    • Jaacob Bowden

      Aug 6, 2015 at 8:45 am

      Hey Paul!

      Sorry if there was any confusion about the monthly membership…but congrats on the speed gains!

      Jaacob

  9. Erik

    Aug 5, 2015 at 5:26 pm

    Also a great way to kill your CNS and your touch around the greens!

    • Jaacob Bowden

      Aug 5, 2015 at 9:33 pm

      That hasn’t been my observation.

    • KK

      Aug 5, 2015 at 10:40 pm

      LOL, kill your CNS? I think you’re referring to Parkinson’s or MS. These exercises are part of pilates and similar to yoga and will do much more for you than sitting on a coach.

  10. Nick Buchan

    Aug 5, 2015 at 1:08 pm

    Hi Jacob. Really interesting article! As a powerlifter I have used isometrics in my training and they are such a powerful training tool for increasing strength and I have always wondered if these could transfer over into functional and golf specific performance. This post maybe just have inspired to begin experimenting. In your swing speed training do you typically use exercises that place the golfer in golf posture or mimic the golf swing then?

    • Jaacob Bowden

      Aug 5, 2015 at 1:17 pm

      Hi Nick,

      Thanks.

      There are varying opinions within the golf fitness community about the degree to which something needs to mimic the golf swing in order to have benefit.

      From the specific standpoint of developing more swing speed and club head speed, which is one of my niche areas of expertise, it’s been my experience that results are better when mirroring what one does in their golf swing.

      So yes!

      Jaacob

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Instruction

What is ground force in the golf swing?

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There is no doubt about it, the guys and gals on tour have found something in the ground—and that something is power and speed. I’m sure by now you have heard of “ground reaction forces”—and I’m not talking about how you “shift your weight” during the golf swing.

Ground force in the golf swing: Pressure and force are not equal

With respect to ground force in the golf swing, it’s important to understand the difference between pressure and force. Pressure is your perception of how your weight is being balanced by the structure, in this case, the human body. Your body has a center of mass which is located roughly one inch behind the belt buckle for men and about one inch lower in women. When we shift (translate and/or torque) the center of mass, we create a pressure shift as the body has to “rebalance” the mass or body. This pressure shift can help us understand some aspects of the golf swing, but when it comes to producing power, force and torque are where it’s at.

Pressure can only be expressed in relation to the mass or weight of the body. Therefore, if you weigh 150 pounds, you can only create 150 pounds of pressure at one time. However, when we direct that mass at a larger object than our mass, all of a sudden that larger mass directs an opposite and equal reactionary force. So now, when a human being “pushes” their legs against the ground and “feels” 150 pounds of pressure, they now get 150 pounds of force directed back towards them from the ground, creating a total of 300 pounds of force that allows them to jump off the ground in this scenario.

If ground reaction forces don’t have anything to do with the “weight shift,” then what do they affect? Everything!

Most people use the same basic ingredients to make chocolate chip cookies. However, almost everyone has chocolate chip cookies that taste slightly different. Why is that? That is because people are variable and use the ingredients in different amounts and orders. When we create a golf swing, whether we are aware of it or not, we are using the same basic ingredients as everyone else: lateral force, vertical torque, and vertical force. We use these same three forces every time we move in space, and how much and when we use each force changes the outcome quite a bit.

Welcome to the world of 3D!

Understanding how to adjust the sequencing and magnitude of these forces is critical when it comes to truly owning and understand your golf swing. The good news is that most of our adjustments come before the swing and have to do with how we set up to the ball. For example, if an athlete is having a hard time controlling low point due to having too much lateral force in the golf swing (fats and thins), then we narrow up the stance width to reduce the amount of lateral force that can be produced in the swing. If an athlete is late with their vertical force, then we can square up the lead foot to promote the lead leg straightening sooner and causing the vertical force to happen sooner.

While we all will need to use the ground differently to play our best golf, two things need to happen to use the ground effectively. The forces have to exist in the correct kinetic sequence (lateral, vertical torque, vertical force), and the peaks of those forces need to be created within the correct windows (sequencing).

  • Lateral force – Peak occurs between top-of-swing and lead arm at 45 degrees
  • Vertical torque – Peak occurs between lead arm being 45 degrees and the lead arm being parallel to the ground.
  • Vertical force – Peak occurs between lead arm being parallel to the ground the club shaft being parallel to the ground.

While it may seem obvious, it’s important to remember ground reaction forces are invisible and can only be measured using force plates. With that said, their tends to be apprehension about discussing how we use the ground as most people do not have access to 3D dual force plates. However, using the screening process designed by Mike Adams, Terry Rowles, and the BioSwing Dynamics team, we can determine what the primary forces used for power production are and can align the body in a way to where the athlete can access his/her full potential and deliver the club to the ball in the most effective and efficient way based off their predispositions and anatomy.

In addition to gaining speed, we can help athletes create a better motion for their anatomy. As golfers continue to swing faster, it is imperative that they do so in a manner that doesn’t break down their body and cause injury. If the body is moving how it is designed, and the forces acting on the joints of the body are in the correct sequence and magnitude, not only do we know they are getting the most out of their swing, but we know that it will hold up and not cause an unforeseen injury down the road.

I truly believe that force plates and ground reaction forces will be as common as launch monitors in the near future. Essentially, a launch monitor measures the effect and the force plates measure the cause, so I believe we need both for the full picture. The force plate technology is still very expensive, and there is an educational barrier for people seeking to start measuring ground reaction forces and understanding how to change forces, magnitudes, and sequences, but I’m expecting a paradigm shift soon.

 

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Why you are probably better at golf than you think (Part 2)

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Golf is very much a monkey-see-monkey-do sport. If you ever go to the local range, you are sure to see golfers trying to copy the moves of their favorite player. Sometimes it works, and sometimes it does not. While I understand the logic of trying to mimic the “secret move” of the most recent winner on tour, I always balk when the person trying to create their best impression fails to realize the physical differences between them and the best golfing athletes in the world.

Read part 1 here. 

In addition to most golfers not being at the same fitness levels as the best players in the world, they also do not have bodies that are identical to their favorite player. This single statement proves why there is not one golf swing; we all are different sizes and are going to swing the club differently due to these physical differences.

You have to understand your swing

The biggest reason I believe that golfers are better than they think is most golfers I meet do not understand what their swings should look like. Armed with video after video of their golf swing, I will always hear about the one thing that the golfer wishes they could change. However, that one thing is generally the “glue” or athleticism of the athlete on display and is also the thing that allows them to make decent contact with the ball.

We are just coming out of the “video age” of golf instruction, and while I think that recording your golf swing can be extremely helpful, I think that it is important to understand what you are looking for in your swing. As a young coach, I fell victim to trying to create “pretty swings”, but quickly learned that there is not a trophy for prettiest swing.

It comes down to form or function, and I choose function

The greatest gift I have ever received as an instructor was the recommendation to investigate Mike Adams and BioSwing Dynamics. Mike, E.A. Tischler, and Terry Rowles have done extensive research both with tour-level players as well as club golfers and have developed a way to test or screen each athlete to determine not only how their golf swing will look, but also how they will use the ground to create their maximum speed. This screen can be completed with a tape measure and takes about five minutes, and I have never seen results like I have since I began measuring.

For example, a golfer with a greater wingspan than height will have a golf swing that tracks more to the outside during the backswing and intersects the body more towards the trail shoulder plane during the backswing. A golfer with a shorter wingspan than height will have a swing that tracks more to the inside and intersects the body closer to the trail hip plane. Also, a golfer with a greater wingspan than height will have a more upright dynamic posture than a golfer with a shorter wingspan than height who will be more “bent over” at the address position.

Sport coats and golf swings

Have you ever bought a sport coat or suit for a special occasion? If so, pay attention to whether it is a short, regular, or long. If you buy a long, then it means that your arms are longer than your torso and you can now understand why you produce a “steeper” backswing. Also, if you stand with your feet about shoulder-width apart and your middle-finger tips touching the top of your kneecaps, you will have perfect dynamic posture that matches your anatomy. If it appears that you are in a taller posture, then you have your second clue that your wingspan is greater than your height.

Translation to improvement

Using this and five other screens, we can help the athletes understand a complete blueprint of their golf swing based off their anatomy. It is due to the work of Mike, E.A., and Terry that we can now matchup the player to their swing and help them play their best. The reason that I believe that most golfers are better than they think is that most golfers have most of the correct puzzle pieces already. By screening each athlete, we can make the one or two adjustments to get the player back to trusting their swing and feeling in control. More importantly, the athlete can revisit their screen sheet when things misfire and focus on what they need to do, instead of what not to do.

We are all different and all have different swings. There is no one way to swing a golf club because there is no one kind of golfer. I encourage every golfer to make their swing because it is the only one that fits.

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How golf should be learned

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With the COVID-19 pandemic, golf is more popular than ever. Beginners being introduced to the game often find that golf is very hard, much harder than other sports they have played. To simplify the golf swing and make the game easier, it needs to start with a concept.

Golf should first be learned from a horizontal position. If the ball was placed four feet above the ground on a large tee, players would naturally turn in an efficient direction with the proper sequence to strike the ball on the tee.

Take for example, a person throwing a ball towards a target. With their eyes out in front of them? having an awareness to the target, their body would naturally turn in a direction to go forward and around towards the target. In golf, we are bent over from the hips, and we are playing from the side of the golf ball, so players tend to tilt their body or over-rotate, causing an inefficient backswing.

This is why the golf swing should be looked at as a throwing motion. The trail arm folds up as the body coils around. To throw a ball further, the motion doesn’t require more body turn or a tilt of the body.

To get the feeling of this horizontal hitting position or throwing motion, start by taking your golf posture. Make sure your trail elbow is bent and tucked with your trail shoulder below your lead shoulder.

From here, simply lift your arms in front of you while you maintain the bend from your hips. Look over your lead shoulder looking at the target. Get the clubhead traveling first and swing your arms around you. Note how your body coils. Return the club back to its original position.

After a few repetitions, simply lower your arms back to the ball position, swing your arms around you like you did from the horizontal position. Allow your shoulders, chest and hips to be slightly pulled around. This is now your “throwing position” in the golf swing. From here, you are ready to make a downswing with less movement needed to make a proper strike.

Note: Another great drill to get the feel for this motion is practicing Hitting driver off your knees.

Twitter: @KKelley_golf

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