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Nike VR_S Covert Fairway Woods: Editor Review

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Pros: We love the adjustability of the VR_S Covert Tour fairway woods ($249), which gives golfers five different lofts and three different face angles to choose from. That makes them the most adjustable fairway woods you can buy. The Covert Tour is lower spinning and less forgiving than Nike’s non-adjustable standard model, the VR_S Covert ($199), but both models are pretty forgiving for their sizes.

Cons: They’re not quite as long as their competitors — notably Callaway’s X Hot or TaylorMade’s RBZ Stage 2 fairway woods — because they’re not as low spinning. Some golfers who fit into the standard model will be bummed that it lacks adjustability.

Bottom Line: The adjustability of the Covert Tour fairway woods makes them great for tinkerers — golfers who want to use their 3 woods as a second driver one day and a second-shot club the next. Most PGA Tour players have gravitated toward the standard model, which is higher spinning, more forgiving and has a softer, quieter sound. Both models come with “real deal” Mitsubishi Rayon Kurokage shafts, making them a lot of fairway wood for the money.

Overview

Nike’s VR_S Covert and Covert Tour fairway woods feature the same cavity-back technology as Nike’s VR_S Covert drivers, which allowed engineers to increase the amount of perimeter weighting to make the clubs more forgiving. They also have Nike’s NexCor steel faces, which Nike says creates longer shots across a wider area of the face.

The standard, or “Performance” model, comes in two lofts: 3 wood (15 degrees) and 5 wood (19 degrees) with a Mitsubishi Rayon’s Kurokage Black 60 shaft in regular, stiff and x-stiff flexes. Check out the specs below.

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 Above: Nike Covert “Performance” 5 wood.

Covert 3 Wood (15 degrees)

  • Club Head Size: 181 cubic centimeters
  • Length: 43 inches
  • Lie: 57 degrees
  • Face angle: 1.5 degrees open
  • Head weight: 214 grams
  • Swing weight: D1 to D3

Covert 5 wood (19 degrees)

  • Club Head Size: 160 cubic centimeters
  • Length: 42 inches
  • Lie: 58 degrees
  • Face angle: 1.5 degrees open
  • Head weight: 218 grams
  • Swing weight: D1 to D3

The Covert Tour is also available in two models — 3 wood and 5 wood. But Nike’s FlexLoft system gives each model five different loft settings and three independent face angle settings: N or neutral, which sets up square, R or right, which opens the face 1.5 degrees and L or left, which closes the face 1.5 degrees.

nike covert fairway

Above is the Nike Covert 3 wood crown

They come stock with Mitsubishi’s Kurokage Silver 70 shafts, which are lower launching and lower spinning than the Kurokage Black shafts, and are available in regular, stiff and x-stiff flexes.

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Covert 3 Wood Sole (Cavity) Photo above

Covert Tour 3 Wood (13 to 17 degrees)

  • Club Head Size: 194 cubic centimeters
  • Length: 43 inches
  • Lie angle: 58 degrees
  • Face angle (in neutral): 1 degree open
  • Head weight: 214.5 grams
  • Swing weight: D3 to D5

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Above photos is the Covert Tour 3 wood Face

Covert Tour 5 wood (17 to 21 degrees)

  • Club Head Size: 177 cubic centimeters
  • Length: 42 inches
  • Lie angle: 59 degrees
  • Face angle (in neutral): 1 degree open
  • Head weight: 224.5 grams
  • Swing weight: D3 to D5

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Above: Nike Covert Tour 5 wood.

Performance

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Above: The Covert Tour (left) has Nike’s FlexLoft system, giving it 15 different possible loft and face angle settings. 

According to Nike Product Line Manager Tony Dabbs, the Covert Tour is about 300 to 400 rpm lower spinning, and about 0.75 degrees lower launching than the standard version for PGA Tour players. Neither model is going to be as low spinning as Callaway’s X Hot or TaylorMade’s RBZ Stage 2 fairway woods, two of the longest fairway woods that we’ve tested, but Dabbs said that was by design.

“We have issues with a lot of our tour players hitting 3 wood too far,” Dabbs said. “They’re not looking for a 330-yard 3 wood.”

Dabbs said that the faces of the Covert fairway woods are just as hot as the leaders, but that the company decided to make this version of fairway woods with a little more spin and a higher launch to give golfers more playability and control.

Click here to watch a video on why Rory McIlroy and Tiger Woods play the Performance model of the Nike Covert fairway woods.

For golfers with less swing speed, or those who have trouble hitting their fairway woods high enough, the standard head will make sense. It’s smaller, has a shallower face, and comes with a higher-launching, higher spinning shaft. Players who are looking to reduce spin will favor the Covert Tour, which is larger, has a deeper face, and has a shaft that will offer a more penetrating trajectory.

Golfers who fit in-between the heads will likely be more concerned with appearance and adjustability, which could play a bigger role than launch monitor numbers.

The FlexLoft system on the Covert Tour is a game changer for golfers who have struggled to get the correct loft and face angle combination in their fairway woods. In most models, lowering the loft means opening the face angle, while raising the loft means closing the face angle. The Covert Tour allows golfers to change the face angle independently of loft, meaning that regardless how the loft is set they can still get an opened, closed or neutral face angle at address.

Keep in mind that while the primary purpose of changing the face angle of a club is to influence the starting line of a shot (opened faces start the ball more right, closed faces start the ball more left), those adjustments will also influence dynamic loft — the actual loft of the part of the club that hits the ball at impact. For example, if a club has a more opened face angle, golfers will be forced to rotate the club more closed to square the club face at impact. This will reduce dynamic loft, resulting in a lower launch and lower spin. The opposite is true of closed face angles.

The nice thing about the Covert Tour fairway woods is that unless a golfer is at the upper or lower end of the loft range, he or she can bump the loft up or down to dial in the proper amount of launch and spin for their face angle setting.

Looks/Feel

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Above: The Covert fairway woods at address. Notice the bigger hosel on the Tour model (right). 

The Covert Tour fairway wood is slightly bigger in every respect than the standard model. It starts with the FlexLoft hosel, which had to be made bigger than standard hosels to accomodate the dual-axis mechanism that makes independent loft and and lie adjustments possible. The face is also taller, which will add confidence when the ball is teed up. But it could scare lower swing speed players when they try to hit the club off the ground. It also has a higher-pitched, louder sound than the standard model, which feels a little harsher on mishits.

Both clubs have the same red crown Nike Swoosh logo, but the Tour model has a black finish on the face and the sole that we think makes it look more stealthy.

The Takeaway

The Covert fairway woods aren’t longest fairway woods on the market, but they’re certainly one of the most forgiving — especially the Performance model. Better golfers who want a new fairway wood they can play straight off the rack will enjoy the Covert Tour, which has a stout stock shaft option and enough adjustability to get most golfers the results they want.

Gearheads might be tempted to do what many tour players have done — experiment with heavier, low-spin shafts in in the Performance head. That could ultimately give them the best of both worlds, meaning they could end up with a club that allows them to hit high, low-spin bombs from the tee, fairway and light rough. Of course, the Performance head doesn’t have the face angle or loft adjustability that comes with the tour head, so they better like the way the club looks at address.

Check out more photos of the Covert and Covert Tour fairway woods below, and click here to see what members are saying about the clubs in the forums. 

 

Click here to see what members are saying about the clubs in the forums.

 

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GolfWRX is the world's largest and best online golf community. Expert editorial reviews, breaking golf tour and industry news, what to play, how to play and where to play. GolfWRX surrounds consumers throughout the buying, learning and enrichment process from original photographic and video content, to peer to peer advice and camaraderie, to technical how-tos, and more. As the largest online golf community we continue to protect the purity of our members opinions and the platform to voice them. We want to protect the interests of golfers by providing an unbiased platform to feel proud to contribute to for years to come. You can follow GolfWRX on Twitter @GolfWRX and on Facebook.

9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. dr.eva steinharter

    Dec 20, 2013 at 1:00 pm

    is it true that nike is discontinuing ladies covert
    fairways-woods?

  2. MCM

    Aug 22, 2013 at 9:02 pm

    ?????

  3. Robert

    Jun 10, 2013 at 10:52 pm

    Great review. I’m killing the 3 wood tour. Off the deck or tee its going in the bag now. Sits perfect on the ground and Nike has done an excellent job with this years metal woods.

  4. Sam

    Jun 2, 2013 at 10:10 am

    I never thought I’d own a Nike golf club. After I tried just about every 3 wood at my club this year, I liked the Nike Covert Tour the best.
    It might not be as long as the X-Hot or the Rocketballz but that can be attributed to the fact the shaft is an inch shorter.

    • Adam

      Jun 7, 2013 at 4:03 pm

      I agree Sam. I went to Dicks saying I would never buy a Nike club. But after hitting all the drivers it came down to the nike and the rocketballz. I Choose Nike. I liked the adjust-ability which ultimately gave me straighter drives. The Nike is registered an average of 109 club speed and the rocketballz was 111-12 for me. Oh, and they finally fixed the sound of the nike club. Its very nice.

  5. Pingback: Nike VR_S Covert Fairway Woods: Editor Review – GolfWRX | Golf Products Reviews

  6. Jack

    May 31, 2013 at 5:49 pm

    Crap clubs for the junior wannabes at the local muni. Real players learned a long time ago that Nike retail is junk.

    • Scott

      Jun 1, 2013 at 8:04 pm

      Ignorant comment Jack.

      • Harry

        Sep 16, 2013 at 6:36 am

        Jack, try telling the best player in the world that his clubs are junk.

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Equipment

Forum Thread of the Day: “What golf-related Father’s Day gift did you get?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from nuttinbutapeanut, who asked fellow members what golf-related gift they received for Father’s Day. Our members share what they received, as well as gave on Father’s Day.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • OSpreyCI: “PXG 0811x Driver. Thank you fam bam.”
  • Aviador Naval: “Two hours of time with my son hitting balls and practicing short game on a day with beautiful weather. As an empty nester, that is 1000x more valuable than anything material.”
  • Kingcat990: “Took the father in law golfing, and we posted some horrendous scores. Had a great time piling garbage on the scorecard.”
  • Gautama: “New golf shirt and shorts, and got a surprise treat in a tee time for the whole clan on a little executive 9 hole, par 33 course. First time we’ve done it…my wife, my two sons aged 22 and 18, and my two daughters aged 9 and 6. The whole course was crawling with groups like ours… Not the fastest round any of us have ever played, but very fun.”
  • granata10: “New ping hoofer golf bag. It was needed and wanted.”

Entire Thread: “What golf-related Father’s Day gift did you get?”

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Whats in the Bag

Gary Woodland’s winning WITB: 2019 U.S. Open

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Driver: Ping G410 Plus (9 degrees set at 7)
Shaft: Accra RPG 472 M5+ (44.75 inches, tipped 2 inches)

3-wood: Ping G410 LST (14.5 degrees set at 13.6)
Shaft: Accra Tour ZX 4100 M5 (42.5 inches, tipped 2.5 inches)

Irons: Wilson Staff Model Blades (3-PW)
Shafts: KBS Tour C-Taper 130 X shafts

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design SM7 (52-08F, 58-10S), TaylorMade Hi-Toe (64 degrees)
Shafts: KBS Hi-Rev 2.0 125 X

Putter: Scotty Cameron Newport prototype
Grip: SuperStroke Pistol GT 2.0

Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet Cord Midsize

Ball: Titleist Pro V1

 

 

 

 

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Equipment

Titleist T200, T300 iron seeding begins at Travelers Championship

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The last few weeks for Titleist have been very busy.

First, we had the new TS series of hybrids and aptly named U-Series utilities/long iron replacements, then shortly after the T100s and new 620 MB and CB irons debuted. Now, to potentially round out the iron lineup we are seeing the T200 and T300s.

We can only speculate at the moment, but based on the rebranding across the line up, from the TS Hybrids to returning to using “600” to identify iron models, I feel confident that this “T” series name will be the replacement for the AP line (RIP Titleist AP Series, you had a great run).

This simple name change makes a lot of sense for a number of reasons when you consider how other OEMs generally identify models: in sequence going from the most players club to the most forgiving. The AP had this with the AP1 and AP2, but with the introduction of the AP3, it was from all accounts (what I have heard through friends across retail channels in the industry) a confusing club for consumers to understand where it fits in the lineup, since the AP1 is still the most player friendly. We have to remember that not all golfers are as continuously up to date like the readers here at GolfWRX!

These types of rebranding decisions are never made in haste by OEMs since it can have lasting effects on naming down the line, but with this refresh, I think it will help consumers understand what model is right for them and make it easier for fitters to help explain too.

The above image is a perfect representation that shows a widening sole from the T100 – 300 along with an ever-increasing depth to the cavity.

We don’t have any tech specs for the new models yet but there are a few little nuggets we can speculate on from the provided images

  • Multi-material: This was a staple in the AP line since its introduction and with the ability to increase MOI without physically increasing the size of the club. It would appear the new T series will offer varying versions of this to create the best fit
  • Easy to blend: Similar appearances and close in looks (as a whole), these sets should be prime candidates for building combo sets
  • Cast?: First images of the 620s and T100 all had “Forged” on the hosels, but that is noticeably absent from the hosels of the T200 and T300s. With multi-material construction and different polymers and elastomers, a “great” feeling clubs doesn’t have to be forged (we’ve debunked that myth a LONG time ago). Plus, if face inserts are used to help create higher MOI and ball speed who cares how they do it? I know I don’t!

Heres the big one: Mi-Max Impact technology?!?! Yeah I don’t know what it means either, but considering every tiny detail of every club goes through so many design renderings before seeing the light of day, for Titleist to put this in writing on the back of the T200 (in what looking like the bottom of a bullet) means it’s going to be a big part of the story. We also see this Mi on the back of the T300 too, on what I can only assume is part of the vibration dampening system.

Titleist pushed the envelope, with the CNCPT series, in materials, construction, and cost, and like all things technology, the longer it’s available the less expensive it becomes to mass manufacture. Will part of what makes the series so good be making its way into the new T200 and T300 irons and more readily available? Not sure just yet. But when we do know we will be sure to let you know too.

Titleist T200 7-iron

Titleist T300 7-iron

Check out more in-hand photos below.

 

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