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Opinion & Analysis

Send in a video of your golf swing for a completely free lesson from V1 Sports

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Here at GolfWRX, we want to help our readers improve at golf, the sport we all love. That means helping you make better buying decisions when it comes to equipment, arming you with knowledge about the swing, teaching you about the mental game, helping you develop fitness regimens, or any of the other many facets necessary to improve.

But we wanted to dive deeper, and give every reader the chance to get customized swing analysis and drills from some of the world’s best instructors.

That’s why we’re so excited to announce our partnership with V1 Sports in our new Lesson of the Day series. As part of this new endeavor, you will not only get a lesson from one of golf’s best instructors through the V1 Sports Platform, but the process is incredibly simple… and it’s FREE. This costs you absolutely nothing.

Recently, our Editor-in-Chief, and newly-left-handed golfer Andrew Tursky went through the process to get his swing analyzed by Matt Trimble, who’s credentials are below:

  • A PGA Member A-6 Teaching professional,
  • Arizona State University Karsten Golf Course (26 years) Golf Digest “Best in State Teachers” Arizona
  • Volunteer Coach Arizona State Women’s Golf (2017 NCAA National Champions)

Here’s the video lesson Trimble sent back to Tursky:

To get your chance at a free lesson, just like the one above, here’s how it works:

For iOS

Step 1)

Open or download the V1 Golf App on iTunes, which is free.

Step 2)

Login: If you already have a V1 Golf Account, log in. If not, select Sign Up on the login screen to create a new account. Once your account has been created, log in with your new credentials.

Step 3)

Connect to the GolfWRX Academy: Select Instructors on the bottom main menu. Then search for and select GolfWRX, then select Lesson of the Day.

Step 4)

Capturing or Importing a Swing Video – Select the Camera icon on the bottom menu. To start the recording, tap the red icon at the bottom center of the screen. Press the red icon again to end capture. To import video from your Photos, tap Import in the lower left corner of the video capture screen. This will open the Photos app and allow you to select a video to import.

Pro Tips:

  • The stopwatch in the top right corner can be used to delay the start of capture if you are alone.
  • Swipe left or right on the screen to activate the guide marker. The current mode is shown above the record button. This will add an alignment overlay to the viewfinder to help you determine the proper distance between subject and camera. Move closer or further away, until the subject fits approximately inside of the overlay area. This tool is only intended for camera alignment and will not appear in your recorded videos.  
  • Swing videos should be taken at waist level either face-on (directly in front of the golfer) or down-the-line (facing the target with the golfer directly in-between).

Step 5)

Submit a swing: Select Videos on the bottom main menu. Then select the three dot menu to the right of the video that you’d like to submit. Then select Send Video to my pro. Select Send Video to my Pro again on the confirmation page

That’s it! If your video gets selected, one of V1 Golf’s top instructors will analyze your swing, and your lesson video will be published on GolfWRX as a “Lesson of the Day.”

For Android

Step 1)

Open the V1 Golf App: If you haven’t already, download the free V1 Golf app from the Google Play store.

Step 2)

Login: If you already have a V1 Golf Account, log in. If not, select Create an Account on the login screen to create a new account. Once your account has been created, login with your new credentials.

Step 3)

Capturing or Importing a Swing Video – Press Camera icon on the app home page to activate the camera. When the camera starts, you will find all recording functions along the bottom of the display. To record a new video, press the large red record icon at the bottom center of the screen to start the capture process, then press the red button a second time to end capture.  

To import an existing video from your Android Gallery, tap Import in the lower left corner instead of pressing record. This will open the Gallery feature and allow you to select which video to use.

To exit capture mode, press the Back button on your device.

Pro Tip: Swing videos should be taken at waist level either face-on (directly in front of the golfer) or down-the-line (facing the target with the golfer directly in-between).

Step 4)

Open video to be submitted, then tap V1/Menu > Send to start the upload process. Click Change Academy to bring up the academy selection tool. Use the (Add a new Academy) option to search for GolfWRX, then select Lesson of the Day as the instructor.

Step 4)

The video will automatically start uploading and be submitted to the Lesson of the Day campaign.

That’s it! If your video gets selected, one of V1 Sports’ top instructors will analyze your swing, and your lesson video will be published on GolfWRX as a “Lesson of the Day.”

If you have any issues at all when uploading your swing video, head over to V1 Sports support chat in the V1 Golf app. By entering your video into this system, you agree to have your video be used in a GolfWRX Front Page story. Thanks for participating! 

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1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Ab

    Sep 11, 2018 at 7:46 pm

    What a stupid exercise in futility! Nothing can come of it other than confirming your incompetence.

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Opinion & Analysis

Slow players: step aside! A reflection on pace of play by a fed-up golfer

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I’m just gonna say it: You are more than likely, in my opinion, a slow player.

This has nothing to do with handicap, riding vs. walking, or (most likely) the course—it’s about attitude and habits.

Where does this blanket statement come from, you might ask. Well, I consider myself a quick player. Alone and walking on a normal-length (6,500-6,800 yard) course, I can get around in about two hours with nobody in front of me—easily. I don’t run, I walk at a normal pace with intent to get to my ball see what needs to be done, and I hit the shot. When playing alone in a cart, I make it around in under an hour-and-a-half regularly, which makes for either an early day or 36 holes before 10 a.m.

Now before going any further, I need to make a few things clear

  • I’m not an anti-social curmudgeon who gets no pleasure from playing golf with others. I actually prefer to play with other people and talk about golf and whatever else is going on.
  • I’m NOT a golf snob. I mean in some ways I can be, but on the other hand, I’ll take a cart, drink beers, blast music, have fun, pick up short ones, and pay little attention to score. It all depends on the situation.
  • I’m still there to play well. Playing fast and playing well are NOT mutually exclusive. The two can be easily achieved during the same round of golf. Too many people going over too many things is only creating more problems…but I’ll get to that.

So where does this all begin? Like many things, on the putting green before an early round of golf. It is my personal belief that if you are one of the first groups off for the day, you should play in around 3-3.5 hours max. Regardless of handicap, it should be one of those “unwritten” rules of golf—like not randomly yelling in someone’s backswing or walking through someone’s line. I have no problem with a round taking more than four hours at 2 p.m. on a busy Saturday afternoon in July when the course is packed—because the chance of me being out then is pretty close to zero anyway. It’s about the golf course setting expectations with the players especially early in the day and making sure that players understand there are expectations. A marshal tip-toeing around a slow group instead of just asking then to let faster groups play through is the bane of my golfing existence.

Based on previous life experience, it’s actually very similar (but in a weird way opposite) to the restaurant business. A group at a table should never just sit around on a Friday or Saturday night at prime time when there is a lineup, and they have already finished their meal and paid the check. That table is real estate, and if you want to occupy that space, you better keep paying, it’s inconsiderate to the next guests waiting and to the servers that make money from the people they seat—it’s called the restaurant business for a reason. If you want to go on a quiet lunch date and sit and chat with a friend when there are plenty of empty tables, by all means, take your sweet time (and hopefully tip generously), but at the end of the day, it’s about being aware of the situation.

On a wide-open course with everyone behind you, as a golfer, you should be mindful that you should play quickly. If its 7 a.m. and the group behind has been waiting in the fairway for five minutes while you plumbob that six-footer for triple with nothing on the line, maybe it’s time to move to the next tee, or be mindful and let the group behind play through. Don’t think for a second I’m just playing with a bunch of scratch golfers either. I play with golfers of all skill levels, and when I play with beginners I always make sure to politely explain any etiquette in a nice way, and if we “fall behind” to let anyone waiting to play through—it’s common courtesy. Usually, these rounds are played later in the day when we can take our time but if a group comes up we let them on their way as soon as possible.

With so much talk about golf in the UK thanks to The Open Championship, it’s crazy to me how the culture of golf is so different in North America where golf is meant to be social, enjoy the day, take your time, a place to do business (please just pull my hair out now), etc. While in the UK, it’s about playing for score and socializing after: that’s the reason for the 19th hole in the first place. They often employ match play to keep pace up vs. putting everything out too. Golf was never meant to be a full-day event. It’s a game to be played and then one with your day.

I realize we have a problem and instead of just complaining about it, I want to make some simple suggestions for helping things move along a little faster

  • If you are going to use a distance-measuring device have it ready.
  • If you for sure lost a ball, don’t waste time: just drop one—on that note if you are on the other side of the hole, don’t walk across to help your friend look in three inches of grass, play up to the green.
  • Place your bag, or drive your cart to where you will be walking after you finish the hole. It was one of the first things I was taught as a junior and it still amazes me how many people leave their clubs at the front of the green or opposite side of where they will be walking next.
  • Play from the proper tees!!!! I shouldn’t have to explain this.
  • If you are playing with a friend, try match play or Stableford—it’s amazing how this can speed up play.

Golf should never be an all-day activity! If you choose to play early, be mindful of the fact that you hold the power to keep the course on time for the rest of the day. Be respectful of the other players on the course who might want to play quicker—let them through. If you want to be slower and you know it’s going to be a social outing, try to pick a more appropriate time of day to play—like late afternoon.

We all play golf for different reasons but be honest with yourself about your reasons and hopefully, we can all get along out there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On Spec

On Spec: Talking about slow play

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Ryan has guest Rob Miller, from the Two Guys Talking Golf podcast, to talk about slow play. They debate on how fast is fast, how much time should 18 holes take, and the type of players who can play fast and slow.

Check out the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes or here to listen on Spotify.

Want more GolfWRX Radio? Check out our other shows (and the full archives for this show) below. 

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Opinion & Analysis

If Jurassic Park had a golf course, this would be it

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I have had the good fortune of playing some unbelievably awesome tracks in my time—places like Cypress Point, Olympic, Sahalee, LACC, Riviera, and a bunch of others.

However, the Bad Little 9 is the most fun golf course I have ever played…period.

Imagine standing on the first tee of a 975-yard track and praying to God almighty you finish with all your golf balls, your confidence, and more importantly, your soul. Imagine, again, for example, standing on a 75-yard par 3 with NOWHERE to hit it beyond an eight-foot circle around the flag, where any miss buries you in a pot bunker or down into a gully of TIGHTLY mown grass.

Sound fun?

I have played the BL9 twice at this point, with the first time being on a Challenge Day in November. It was cold, windy and playing as tough as it can. My playing partners Chris N., Tony C., and I barely made it out alive. I made four pars that day—shot 40—and played well. Do the math, that’s 13 over in five holes on a course where the longest hole is 140 yards.

It’s a golf course that makes zero sense: it’s punishing, it’s unfair, it’s crazy private, and on “Challenge Day,” it’s un-gettable even for the best players in the world. Rumor has it that there is an outstanding bet on Challenge Day for $1,000 cash to the individual that breaks par. That money is still yet to be paid to anyone…keep in mind Scottsdale National has PXG staff playing and practicing there allllll the time. To my knowledge, James Hahn has the lowest score ever at one over. That round apparently had multiple 20-foot par putts.

The Jackson/Kahn team which is responsible for the two big courses at Scottsdale National (Land Mine and The Other Course) were tasked with a challenge by Mr. Parsons: create a 9-hole course with ZERO rules. Take all conventional wisdom out of it and create an experience for the members that they will NEVER forget.

In this video, you will get a little context as to how it came together straight from the horse’s mouth, so I won’t get into that here.

I will end with this before you get into the video.

The Bad Little 9 sits in a very exclusive club in North Scottsdale, most will never see it. HOWEVER, what the idea of it represents is a potential way into bringing more people into the game, making it more accessible, saving real estate, playing in less time and having an experience. Hell, YouTube made short-form content a necessity in our culture. Perhaps the idea behind the Bad Little 9 will inspire short form golf?

I’m in.

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19th Hole

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