Connect with us

Opinion & Analysis

Review: Big Max Blade IP push cart

Published

on

In 2015, I donated my original Big Max Blade+ to a new golfer in Bandon, Oregon. She had taken up the game upon accepting a position at the resort, and I suggested a push cart, to relieve stress on the shoulders and back. It was the simplest cart I’d encountered at the time, in terms of storage and formation (is there a better word for the unfolding of the cart upon extraction from the trunk?) In the midst of a cross-country trip, I played 8 rounds at Bandon Dunes, using the Blade+ on each one. In 2018, Big Max offers a new model, the Blade IP. Based on my experience with its predecessor, the IP is worth a look and a review. I hope to hold onto this one a bit longer, but if cause arises, it will find a new owner. Have a glance at 4 reasons why the big Max Blade IP should be the new push cart in your game.

Reason One: Storage

After a round of golf, we store our cart. First, in the car; next, in the garage or basement. Golfers have an inkling how easy this will be, when the box arrives at your door. The Blade IP rests within, already assembled. You’ll simply extract it from the cardboard storage material and unfold it. With the Blade series, no more searching for a cube of space in the trunk. The Blade IP lays flat and sits cheerfully atop the other bags and carts you’ve stored post-round. In retrospect, although the predecessor also lay flat, the unfolding and refolding did take a bit of work (and an advanced degree.) No such issue with this updated model. According to the home office of Big Max, the principal difference is in the folding mechanism. BIG MAX has completely simplified this into a three stage process. You simply fold the handle, push the two parts of the body together and then lift the cart to see the wheels flip automatically under the body.

I drive a smallish hatchback, and space is at a premium in my ride. With the Blade IP, I’m able to slide it in atop the golf back, with room to spare for extras. Quick run to the store on the way home? Room. Extra “gifts” from the in-laws? Room. Sleeping baby? Car seat.

Reason Two: The look & features

The IP model is sleeker. I have the color black, and confess that it has a bit of the Batmobile in it, at least in the hue.

There are no clips any more (other than on the handle) and the engineering is far superior to the BLADE+. Small details that have improved are the finish on the cart. It has a matte metallic look which is a nice improvement and it also has a bottle holder integral to the organizer panel.

When describing the look, you don’t pause for long. If it’s hot, it’s hot. And the Blade IP is fire.

Reason Three: The weight

It weighs very little, and is as easy to carry as a suitcase. Once the wheels and carriage lock into storage position, there is no threat of unfolding while in transit. As I carried my bag and my cart to the first tee, I was tempted to do curls with the bag (left arm) and the Blade IP (right arm.) Problem was, the balance was off. The bag had to way 2 times as much as the cart. That, and I would have looked quite silly.

The Blade IP weighs in at 14 pounds. It pushes smoothly, thanks to an adjustable handle. When I first began to push, the narrowness of the handle struck me. Then, within 10 paces, I instinctively dropped one hand to my side and began to swing it. I realized that most people don’t push their cart with 2 hands, for very long. They utilize right or left, or both, but not often simultaneously. The IP allows for the single-hand push; actually, it encourages and accommodates it.

Reason Four: The ride

I mention it a bit under Reason Three, as weight segues perfectly to ride. Come to think of it, storage also segues perfectly to ride. Even though the Blade IP is a lightweight model, it has plenty of room for ad-on equipment, like umbrella hanger, towel and glove storage, range finder bag and bottle holder. There’s no need to fish for things in your bag pockets; the handle accommodates nearly everything you might want. Let’s return to the ride. Big Max draws little attention to the construction of the wheels. Nothing beyond the vertical hinge of the forward wheel, and the snap-in/snap-out of the rear wheels. There’s a hidden bonus in the way these wheels turn. There might not be high-end hydraulics, or wonder-bearings at work, but it sure seems that way. I’ve yet to look down at the wheels, wondering what might be wrong with them.

The first time I took out the Blade IP, I was paired with a media personality who had learned the game in Florida. He was incredulous when my pal and I explained that we would walk, that we would easily keep up with him and his buddy in their riding cart, and that we would probably play faster. Seeing was believing that day. I don’t know that he will ever abandon the rider for the pusher, but he should. If you’ve a few spare minutes, have a look at this promotional video (complete with groovy jazz music) on the Big Max Blade IP. It should convince you to consider its purchase for your next push cart.

Your Reaction?
  • 34
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW4
  • LOL2
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP6
  • OB0
  • SHANK5

Ronald Montesano writes for GolfWRX.com from western New York. He dabbles in coaching golf and teaching Spanish, in addition to scribbling columns on all aspects of golf, from apparel to architecture, from equipment to travel. Follow Ronald on Twitter at @buffalogolfer.

2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Andy

    Oct 12, 2018 at 12:19 pm

    So…do they have a cigar holder yet? Required equipment, ya know.

  2. Dom

    Sep 4, 2018 at 4:44 pm

    So… where can we buy this?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Opinion & Analysis

Everyone sucks at golf sometimes

Published

on

“Golf is a game whose aim is to hit a very small ball into an even smaller hole, with tools singularly ill-designed for the purpose.”

This quote dates back over 100 years, and has been credited to a number of people through history including Winston Churchill and U.S. President Woodrow Wilson. Although the game and the tools have changed a lot in 100 years, this quote remains timeless because golf is inherently difficult, and is impossible to master, which is exactly what also makes it so endearing to those that play it.

No matter how hard we practice, or how much time we spend trying to improve there will inevitably be times when we will suck at golf. Just like with other aspects of the game the idea of “sucking” will vary based on your skillset, but a PGA Tour player can hit a hosel rocket shank just as well as a 25 handicap. As Tom Brady proved this past weekend, any golfer can have a bad day, but even during a poor round of golf there are glimmers of hope—like a holed-out wedge, even if it is followed by having your pants rip out on live TV.

I distinctly remember one time during a broadcast when Chris DiMarco hit a poor iron shot on a par 3 and the microphone caught hit exclaim “Come on Chris, you’re hitting it like a 4 handicap out here today” – the shot just barely caught the right side of the green and I imagine a lot of higher handicap golfers said to themselves ” I’d love to hit it like a 4 handicap!”. This is just one example of the expectations we put on ourselves even when most golfers will admit to playing their best when expectations are thrown out the window.

– Gary Larson

Dr. Bob Rotella says golf is not a game of perfect, and that’s totally ok. The game is about the constant pursuit of improvement, not perfection and with that in mind there are going to be days when no matter what we just suck.

Your Reaction?
  • 7
  • LEGIT2
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB0
  • SHANK1

Continue Reading

Opinion & Analysis

By definition, there will be no 2020 U.S. Open. Here’s why the USGA should reconsider

Published

on

In 1942, the USGA decided to cancel the U.S. Open because it was scheduled so soon after U.S. entry into WWII.  They did this out of respect for the nation and those called to war. There was a Championship however called The Hale America National Open Golf Tournament, which was contested at Chicago’s  Ridgemoor Country Club. It was a great distraction from the horror of war and raised money for the great cause.

All the top players of the era (except Sam Snead) played, and the organizers (USGA, Chicago Golf Association, and the PGA of America) did hold qualifying at some 70 sites around the country. So effectively, it was the 1942 U.S. Open—but the USGA never recognized it as such. They labeled it a “wartime effort to raise money” for the cause.  Their objection to it being the official U.S. Open was never clear, although the sub-standard Ridgemoor course (a veritable birdie fest) was certainly part of it.

The USGA co-sponsored the event but did not host it at one of their premier venues, where they typically set the golf course up unusually difficult to test the best players. Anyway, Ben Hogan won the event and many thought this should have counted as his fifth U.S. Open win. The USGA disagreed. That debate may never be settled in golfer’s minds.

Ahead to the 1964 U.S. Open…Ken Venturi, the eventual winner, qualified to play in the tournament. His game at the time was a shell of what it was just a few years earlier, but Kenny caught lighting in a bottle, got through both stages of qualifying, and realized his lifelong dream of winning the U.S. Open at Congressional.

Ahead to the 1969 U.S. Open…Orville Moody, a former army sergeant had been playing the PGA Tour for two years with moderate success-at best. But the golfing gods shone brightly upon “sarge” through both stages of qualifying, and the tournament, as he too realized the dream of a lifetime in Houston.

Ahead to 2009 U.S. Open…Lucas Glover was the 71st ranked player in the world and had never made the cut in his three previous U.S. Opens. But he did get through the final stage of qualifying and went on to win the title at Bethpage in New York.

Ahead to 2020…The USGA has decided to postpone the event this year to September because of the Covid-19 virus. This was for the fear of the global pandemic. But this year there is a fundamental difference—the USGA has announced there will be no qualifying for the event. It will be an exempt-only event. By doing so, the event loses it status as an “open event,” by definition.

This is more than a slight difference in semantics.

The U.S. Open, our national championship, is the crown jewel of all USGA events for many reasons, not the least of which is that it is just that: open. Granted, the likelihood of a club professional or a highly-ranked amateur winning the event—or even making the cut—is slim, but that misses the point: they have been stripped of their chance to do so, and have thereby lost a perhaps once in a lifetime opportunity to realize something they have worked for their whole lives. Although I respect the decision from a  health perspective, golf is being played now across the country, (The Match and Driving Relief—apparently safely)

So, what to do? I believe it would be possible to have one-day 36-hole qualifiers (complete with social distancing regulations) all over the country to open the field. Perhaps, the current health crisis limits the opportunity to hold the qualifiers at the normally premier qualifying sites around the country but, as always, everyone is playing the same course and is at least given the chance to play in tournament.

In light of the recent “opening” of the country, I am asking that the USGA reconsider the decision.

 

featured image modified from USGA image

 

Your Reaction?
  • 104
  • LEGIT6
  • WOW1
  • LOL3
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB1
  • SHANK43

Continue Reading

Podcasts

TG2: Reviewing Tour Edge Exotics Pro woods, forged irons, and LA Golf shafts

Published

on

Reviewing the new Tour Edge Exotics Pro wood lineup, forged irons, and wedge. Maybe more than one makes it into the bag? Fujikura’s MCI iron shafts are some of the smoothest I have ever hit and LA Golf wood shafts get some time on the course.

Check out the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes or here to listen on Spotify.

Want more GolfWRX Radio? Check out our other shows (and the full archives for this show) below. 

Your Reaction?
  • 2
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

WITB

Facebook

Trending