Connect with us

19th Hole

Rickie Fowler will wear these custom Arnold Palmer-inspired kicks this week (and you could win a pair)

Published

on

Last year, the custom pair of Puma kicks designed for Rickie Fowler at the Arnold Palmer Invitational sold for more than $25K at auction.

This year, Fowler, Puma, and company are rolling out another pair of custom Ignite Hi-Tops honoring the King.

The Palmer-inspired footwear feature the King’s signature umbrella logo (as well as his signature…signature in white on the strap). Additionally, Fowler will wear a custom Puma P 110 Snapback with a dancing umbrella pattern.

Like last year, two pairs of the shoes were made. Fowler will wear one pair during the tournament, and the other will be auctioned off to benefit the Arnie’s Army Foundation. Unlike last year, where the highest bidder won, a donation of just $10 earns you entry into the sweepstakes (larger donations yield more entries:$250 =250 entries, etc).

(Image via the PGA Tour on Instagram)

Also improving on last year’s effort: Even if you aren’t lucky enough to win one of the two Nomad Customs-designed pairs of shoes, you could win one of 175 Arnie’s Army snapbacks or one of 62 pairs (the number of Palmer’s PGA Tour wins) of Arnie’s Army commemorative PWRADAPT shoes (pictured below). Those who donate $75 are guaranteed a hat, and those who donate $250, a pair of the PWRADAPT shoes.

You can donate here to earn entries for the shoes. Additionally, there are individual auctions (highest bidder wins) via Charitybuzz for pairs of PWRDADTP shoes signed by Fowler.

 

 

Your Reaction?
  • 12
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL1
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB1
  • SHANK3

4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. Andrew

    Mar 14, 2018 at 4:36 pm

    And it’s such a mystery why more and more of society’s finest loudmouths show up at tour events. The players bring it upon themselves.

  2. mike

    Mar 12, 2018 at 4:02 pm

    Clownish NBA-inspired clothing for golf seems to be where we are headed for the golf course. Golf club design has become extreme in order to sell new models. Now clothing, particularly shoes, are becoming blinging. It’s no longer a gentelman’s game.

    • Progolfer

      Mar 13, 2018 at 11:29 am

      I absolutely agree. It’s disgusting.

    • nyguy

      Mar 13, 2018 at 2:39 pm

      I agree, and Rickie should focus on his game, not the colors of his shoes….

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

19th Hole

Hungover Eddie Pepperell is the real winner of The Open

Published

on

Eddie Pepperell is never dull. The Englishman’s candor, articulateness, and skill with a pen make him a great follow on Twitter and beyond.

But even given standard Peperellian forthrightness, it was surprising to hear this: Pepperell was hungover during the final round at Carnoustie…a round in which he fired a 4-under 67.

Pepperell finished tied for sixth at 5-under, three strokes behind Francesco Molinari, and he offered this admission in his final-round press conference.

“I was a little hungover…I had too much to drink last night. And I was so frustrated yesterday, that today was really, I wouldn’t say a write-off, but I didn’t feel I was in the golf tournament. Whether I shot 69 or 73 today, it wouldn’t have been heartbreaking. But as it happens, I shot 67. So, you know, it’s a funny game.”

Hitting the course before the winds kicked up, Pepperell birdied the third, fifth, sixth, and 14th holes before rolling in another at the 17th.

He clarified that he’s no wino.

“Listen, I wouldn’t always have a drink the night before. Sometimes I have a few drinks. Tiger is minus-7, he didn’t have a drink last night, I bet. Proper athlete…I didn’t really have that much to drink, just I’m a lightweight, yeah.”

Pepperell clarified that he felt okay this morning, but woke up in the middle of the night feeling poorly. he said. Then it was time to sit back and watch as the leaders battled Carnoustie’s back nine.

Proper athlete or no, Pepperell finished tied with Woods at 5 under.

Your Reaction?
  • 82
  • LEGIT3
  • WOW2
  • LOL4
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK7

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Did Tiger Woods choke at The Open?

Published

on

The winds picked up along the coast as the tide came in. The fickle gods of links golf reared their grey heads. Tiger Woods, stitched up and fused together, chasing his 15th major, felt the fury of both late Sunday at The Open.

Carnoustie’s 11th and 12th holes: A pair of poor efforts off the tee in howling crosswinds found the fescue. A pair of recovery efforts saw Woods’ True Temper Dynamic Gold shaft ensnared and golf ball gone awry.

At the par-4 11th, pressing, feeling he couldn’t afford to drop any shots (Woods stated he thought the winning score would be 9 under)–and indeed would need more birdies coming in–Woods left a flop shot out of the rough just short. Trusting in his powers with a 60-degree in hand, Woods went for a shot that would have left im a good look at par, had he pulled it off. Instead, his ball ultimately trickled away from the putting surface in sad retreat.

Two shots later, he filled in a double-bogey 6 on his scorecard, dropping back to even par for the day through 11 holes. He bogeyed the 12th after another sojourn into the thick stuff.

From that point on, Woods escaped the par-5 14th with what was probably an undeserved birdie, but it was all pars on a difficult stretch of holes. After wedging his approach to seven feet at the 72nd hole, Woods should’ve made the putt, sure–his impotent effort fizzled and fell away from the cup. A made putt would have left him one stroke back of Molinari, who was closer (and ultimately made his putt), but it wouldn’t have won him the tournament.

While it’s fair to say Woods didn’t play his best golf down the stretch, and perhaps he asked too much from shots from the rough at the 11th and 12th, the suggestion that he choked, failed to capitalize, or got nervy when the heat was on is off base.

That said, Woods’ legion of detractors will gleefully claim he choked. The Choke Lite take is that while Woods didn’t totally let things slip through his fingers, but the combination of opponents not self-destructing (most did though, Sunday, didn’t they?) and lacking the “step on their necks” gear he displayed so often earlier in his career did him in.

More to the point, the 79-time Tour winner hit a few poor shots and tried to do too much on a couple of occasions. He paid the price for both. The larger import we see likely had more to do with our preconceived notions of Woods than anything that happened inside the ropes at Carnoustie Sunday.

A final word: In the course of admitting that he was “ticked off” at himself for not getting the job done, Woods said

“I need to try and keep it in perspective because, the beginning of the year, if they’d have said you’re playing The Open Championship, I would have said I’d be very lucky to do that.”

We’d do well to maintain the same perspective: If you’re a fan, be glad you have something to cheer for, and if you’re an anti-Tigerite, be glad you have fodder for criticism. Everybody wins!

Your Reaction?
  • 36
  • LEGIT2
  • WOW0
  • LOL3
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP3
  • OB1
  • SHANK29

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Pat Perez: The R&A “do it right, not like the USGA”

Published

on

Pat Perez opened The Open, as it were, with a 2-under 69, and at the time of this writing, he’s 4 under for the second round and tied for the lead.

Clearly, there’s something Double P likes about links golf. And when he was asked whether he was surprised by how receptive the greens at Carnoustie were after his opening round, Perez shook his head with conviction and said.

“They (the R&A) do it right, not like the USGA…They’ve got the opposite [philosophy] here. I told them, you guys have it right, let the course get baked, but you’ve got the greens receptive. They’re not going to run and be out of control. They could have easily had the greens just like the fairway, but they didn’t. The course is just set up perfect.”

“The U.S. Open could have been like this more if they wanted to. They could have made the greens a bit more receptive,” Perez said. “These greens are really flat compared to Shinnecock. So that was kind of the problem there is they let it get out of control and they made the greens too hard.”

Pat Perez has no problem speaking his mind. While it has gotten him in trouble in the past, you have to respect his candor. The interesting question, as I asked in the Morning 9, is how many Tour pros agree him?

Sure, it’s unlikely any of Perez’s compatriots will join him publicly in his “R&A does it right, USGA does it wrong” stance, but it’d be very interesting to know what percentage are of the same mind.

Your Reaction?
  • 228
  • LEGIT20
  • WOW4
  • LOL5
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP1
  • OB0
  • SHANK7

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Facebook

Trending