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Smartphones and competitive golf

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By Chris Hibler

GolfWRX Contributor

In a tournament this past weekend I inadvertently opened a can of worms. I asked the tournament director if I was allowed to use my iPhone as a distance measuring device. The answer I received was an unequivocal “yes,” but he added, “just as long as you only use it for distance.”

My cart partner overheard out discussion and promptly lost his marbles!  He began spouting about it being against the rules:

“The tournament director does not have the power to overrule the USGA,” he said.

I decided to play it conservatively, sticking to my trusty rangefinder instead of my iPhone. As soon as the round ended, I jumped onto my iPad to see what I could find out about this murky and misunderstood rule. You know what I found out? It is a murky rule and I have misunderstood it all year long.

Here are the facts: Prior to 2006, all distance-measuring devices (aka DMD’s) were illegal during competitive rounds. In 2006, the USGA and R&A made a ruling saying that golfers could use a DMD under Local Rules during competitive rounds as long as the devices were either dedicated devices (i.e., laser ranger finders or GPS units) or golfers could use smartphones as long as they only used the devices for the DMD and not for weather or any other “illegal” data.  Thus, we as golfers, were on the “honor system” — as it should be.

But, this year, the USGA and R&A came out and essentially reversed their argument saying that smartphones could be used as DMD as long as they didn’t have the capability anywhere on the device of measuring wind velocity or accessing weather data. This rendered all smartphones illegal as, in the case of iPhones, the phones contain an embedded weather app that cannot be deleted.  Also, all smartphones are web-accessible, meaning you could access any website that has weather info from virtually any smartphone on the market.

This is not new news to most of you as the smartphone ban has been widely discussed since the GPS apps that many golfers have bought have been rendered useless for tournament play by the USGA this year. That could give you an unfair advantage by possibly glancing at your built-in weather app to tell you the speed and direction of the prevailing wind (which could vary widely from where the golfer is on the course, but I digress).

Back at my tournament, since I decided that I would not stir up controversy by using my iPhone, I was faced with a day with no access to my device at all — radio silence. It was just me, my clubs, my laser rangefinder and the hope that a TV was on at the turn to check NFL scores. Yes, many of you are applauding this as you would rather have me focus my attention on my round as opposed to sneaking glances at my “DirecTV Sunday Ticket” app – it keeps the round moving you say. I get that. But for me, the issue isn’t about checking football scores, using the latest golf GPS app, calling home, or even checking the wind speed; the issue here is about trust and integrity — and maybe even greed.

By banning the use of smartphones and related devices, the USGA is essentially saying that if a typical golfer uses these devices they are going to cheat. I’ve got news for you USGA, if I am going to cheat, I am going to REALLY cheat.  What are the ways to REALLY cheat?  Here they are in no particular order:

  • “Find” my lost ball in the deep woods by dropping a matching ball down my pant leg.
  • Improve my lie in the greenside rough to make it easier to chip the ball
  • Count my whiff in the long grass as “a practice swing.”
  • Mark my ball closer to the hole to shorten my putt.

Do I do these things? No. Have I seen (or suspected others) from doing these? You bet. I know one thing, nowhere on that list do you see where I think that a device will give me a wind speed reading that will actually help me to lower my score. I also didn’t make any note on that list about how a compass reading would assist me in any way.

I will go so far as to say that at even the highest level of golf, there would be little advantage gained with the knowledge that a smartphone could tell them about wind direction or wind speed that they couldn’t better themselves by dropping grass clippings in midair moments before their shot.

My point is this: golf is a game of integrity. The job for us as golfers is to play the course fair and square. We call penalties on ourselves when the ball moves inadvertently. We mark the ball where it came to rest on the green. We don’t try to cheat our competitors or ourselves. If you do, you don’t belong in this game.

I personally believe two things about golf integrity, which I call “Golf Karma”

  1. The guilt of “getting away” with a cheat weighs heavily on the golfer’s mind resulting in errant shots as the round progresses.
  2. We get rewarded later in the round for calling a penalty on ourselves (that no one else knew about let alone suspected) based on real self-confidence borne from integrity.

I would like it if the USGA would actually trust us. But, I have a sinking suspicion that the answer lies somewhere in the dirty underbelly of golf merchandising: the groups that benefit most from this inane ruling are the companies that specialize in the “legal” yardage devices. By quashing the low-priced app competition, the USGA has essentially ruled in favor of the handful of companies that create dedicated GPS units and laser rangefinders.

The other point is that common sense tells us that essentially banning smartphones in 2012 and beyond is just not practical in this day and age. Yes, I can recall the old and simpler days where I would leave my phone in the car, take my four hours out on the links and just tune out of life. But, we are simply not wired this way anymore. Our devices have become an extension of ourselves. For golf, it’s simply not practical to ban my possession of a smartphone on the course. I track my stats for later analysis. I keep my scorecards on my phone to see how my game is progressing. Yes, there’s is some wishy-washy part of the rule that states that you can have your phone in your pocket or something along those lines if it’s not in use.

But, I don’t like your chances with a hardline tournament director trying to argue, “I wasn’t using it, it was just in my pocket, kind of off with no weather app and stuff.”

At the end of the day, I would just like the USGA to trust and allow me as a golfer to do a few simple things in 2013:

  • Not cheat with my smartphone while using it during a competitive round.
  • Not slow play by device distraction.
  • Actually speed up play by knowing my yardage quickly without wandering around looking for sprinklers or yardage markers.
  • Save money in a tough economy by using affordable GPS apps on smartphones
  • Use mobile devices versus feeling obligated to purchase expensive “legal” yardage devices.

One final thought and a note to the USGA: what exactly am I supposed to do with my handy and convenient “Rules of Golf” app that you offer through the App store anyway?  I just want to be sure I know what to say when my competitor “finds” his ball in the woods a minute before I find it.

Click here for more discussion in the “Tour Talk” forum. 

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Chris Hibler is an avid golfer, writer and golf gear junkie. If he's not practicing his game with his kids, he's scouring the GolfWRX classifieds looking for a score.

9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. troy

    Nov 12, 2012 at 12:21 pm

    Great article Chris about the intersection of golf and technology. I agree with you — ultimately, the rules of golf are about integrity and self-regulation. You are expected to penalize yourself for infractions and as such each golfer should be trusted not to break the rules with their smart phones.

    I believe in golf karma as well! You will pay for “cheating” and be rewarded for playing by the rules!

  2. dapadre

    Nov 12, 2012 at 8:02 am

    Apologis for my misspellings.

  3. dapadre

    Nov 12, 2012 at 8:01 am

    Nice article. Sometimes I think that we humans love to complicate VERY SIMPLE things. Um, why dont they simply create or approve/sanction a DMD application. Nowadays, this can be ctreated (application) at fractions of the cost. Thsi application would pnly relay distance. Problem solved or am I missing somthing.

  4. tlmck

    Nov 11, 2012 at 7:40 am

    The USGA and R&A are so passe’. It is time for them to go away before they drive all others away.

  5. Dane

    Nov 11, 2012 at 5:25 am

    Golfshot app is what I use too. It’s great, simple, useful and keeps all your stats.

  6. ConradMacDonald

    Nov 10, 2012 at 10:09 pm

    Smartphones should be legal for all competition with the exception of professional tours where it is there job to play golf. For 99.9% of golfers they don’t make there money there and there work could call. In this day and age some people cannot take 4 hours off the phone. I play with many business owners that take calls all round because they have to, business comes before pleasure…

  7. Mats B

    Nov 10, 2012 at 4:18 am

    Great article! We need to get this debate on top of the board. You mension a whole deal of great points and from different perspective.

    I suggest we all put this article on our Facebook walls, Twitter accounts, and make a copy paste mail to our local golf club, our local golf union and national PGA society. USGA and R&A has simply made a mistake changing this rule or adding a change to the rule in 2012. It needs to be corrected sooner than later otherwise it will harm the development of the game and the growth of new players enthusiast joining the game. Which teenager shuts off his mobile phone and put it away for 4-5 hours? No one I know and they are the future for this game…. Todays society demand that you’re accessable almost 24/7, I’m not stating that it’s good, but it is reality. If we are not allowed using our phones on course, we simply don’t go out to the course. And while having your smartphone out there, why not try to use it for the best? Where players can choose themselves how much they want to engage in the game, point down scores and use statistics in order to improve their game and so on….. Why having isolated devices for each task or function, when the technique allows us to gather all we need and require in one device. It’s a time saver, using one device instead of having to go through a number of devices during a round of golf.

    Wake up USGA and R&A, it’s time to realize that future won’t allow for silly roule changes simular to the changes you made last year, it will hurt the game of golf and the sport of golf, in a wider perspective than a few Manufacturers of DMD:s.

    As a reply to your last question Nate, I use Golfshot to my iphone and it works great for me. Once you’ve got used to it, it’s simple, a time saver and gives you an increased awareness of you game and capabilities, if you use the functions for statistic.

    Again, great article and great subject.

    /Mats

  8. Nate Leeds

    Nov 9, 2012 at 9:31 pm

    Great article with many interesting points I’ve never considered. I completely agree, the use of a smartphone should be allowed with the honest onus on us.

    What is the best app to track stats? What kind of stats can I track?

    Thanks in advance.

    Nate

  9. Princeton_TN

    Nov 9, 2012 at 12:27 pm

    I had the exact opposite hit me last week. While playing in a tournament my job called me on three different holes. I had to answer, it was my job! Of course it was a smart phone, and at the time I was leading the tournament or so I was told. After the conclusion of the three hole stretch that I had to talk on the phone, one of the rules officials came up to me on the tee box and informed me that a two stroke penalty was given to me for each hole in which I used my smart phone for phone calls in which I was inside the players ropes! WOW a stretch of holes I just went birdie, birdie and par were now bogey, bogey and double bogey! I asked for an explanation because I was using it for only the call, and was told by my caddie to shut up cause he thought that I should have been disqualified! None the less after words I was destroyed and ended up loosing the event by 8 strokes, I shot an 82 and 74 won the event! It was on holes 10, 11 and 12 and I was 3 over at the turn and had just gotten it to one over before the penalties were assessed… I mean really!!! I think that with the yardage books used today, range finders leagal for USGA and R&A play, why not allow the use of cell phones and any measuring devices that they can hold! It isnt as if only one or two would gain an advantage, because we all have access to them today!!!

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Courses

Barnbougle Lost Farm: 20 Holes of Pure Joy

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Another early day in Tasmania, and we were exploring the Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw-design, Barnbougle Lost Farm. The course was completed in 2010, four years after the neighbor Barnbougle Dunes, resulting in much excitement in the world of golf upon opening.

Johan and I teed off at 10 a.m. to enjoy the course at our own pace in its full glory under clear blue skies. Barnbougle Lost Farm starts out quite easy, but it quickly turns into a true test of links golf. You will certainly need to bring some tactical and smart planning in order to get close to many of the pin positions.

The third hole is a prime example. With its sloping two-tiered green, it provides a fun challenge and makes you earn birdie — even if your tee and approach shots put you in a good position. This is one of the things I love about this course; it adds a welcome dimension to the game and something you probably don’t experience on most golf courses.

(C) Jacob Sjöman. jacob@sjomanart.com

The 4th is an iconic signature hole called “Sals Point,” named after course owner Richard Sattler’s wife (she was hoping to build a summer home on the property before it was turned into a golf course). A strikingly beautiful par-3, this hole is short in distance but guarded with luring bunkers. When the prevailing northwesterly wind comes howling in from the ocean, the hole will leave you exposed and pulling out one of your long irons for the tee shot. We left No. 4 with two bogeys with a strong desire for revenge.

Later in the round, we notice our scorecard had a hole numbered “13A” just after the 13th. We then noticed there was also an “18A.” That’s because Barnbougle Lost Farm offers golfers 20 holes. The designers believed that 13A was “too good to leave out” of the main routing, and 18A acts as a final betting hole to help decide a winner if you’re left all square. And yes, we played both 13A and 18A.

I need to say I liked Lost Farm for many reasons; it feels fresh and has some quirky holes including the 5th and the breathtaking 4th. The fact that it balks tradition with 20 holes is something I love. It also feels like an (almost) flawless course, and you will find new things to enjoy every time you play it.

The big question after trying both courses at Barnbougle is which course I liked best. I would go for Barnbougle Dunes in front of Barnbougle Lost Farm, mostly because I felt it was more fun and offered a bigger variation on how to play the holes. Both courses are great, however, offering really fun golf. And as I wrote in the first part of this Barnbougle-story, this is a top destination to visit and something you definitely need to experience with your golf friends if you can. It’s a golfing heaven.

Next course up: Kingston Heath in Melbourne.

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PGA Tour Pro and Parkland Alum Nick Thompson is Part of the Solution

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The tragic shooting of 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida moved the entire nation in a deep and profound way. The tragic events touched many lives, including PGA Tour Professional Nick Thompson, who attended Stoneman Douglas for four years and was born and raised just minutes from there.

On our 19th Hole podcast, Thompson described in detail just how connected he is to the area and to Douglas High School.

“That’s my alma mater. I graduated in ’01. My wife Christen and I graduated in ’01. I was born and raised in Parkland…actually Coral Springs, which is a neighboring city. Stoneman Douglas actually is just barely in Parkland but it’s pretty much right on the border. I would probably guess there are more kids from Coral Springs that go to Stoneman Douglas than in Parkland. So I spent 29 years in Coral Springs before moving to Palm Beach Gardens where I live now, but I was born and raised there. I spent four years of high school there and it’s near and dear to my heart.”

Thompson’s siblings, LPGA Tour star Lexi Thompson and Web.com pro Curtis, did not attend Douglas High School.

His reaction to the news was immediate and visceral.

“I was in shock,” said Thompson. “I just really couldn’t believe it because Coral Springs and Parkland are both wonderful communities that are middle to upper class and literally, like boring suburbia. There’s not much going on in either city and it’s kind of hard to believe that it could happen there. It makes you think almost if it could happen there, it could happen anywhere. I think that’s one of the reasons why it has really gotten to a lot of people.”

Thompson knew personally some of the names that have become familiar to the nation as a result of the shooting, including Coach Aaron Feis, who died trying to save the lives of students.

“I went to high school with Aaron Feis,” said Thompson. “He was two years older than me, and I knew of him…we had a fair amount of mutual friends.”

And while the events have provoked much conversation on many sides, Thompson was moved to action.

“We started by my wife and I, the night that it happened, after we put our kids to bed, we decided that we needed to do something,” Thompson said. “The first thing we decided was we were going to do ribbons for the players, caddies, and wives. We did a double ribbon of maroon and silver, the school colors, pin them together and wrote MSD on the maroon section. We had the media official put them out on the first tee, so all the players were wearing them. It’s been great.”

“I got together with the media guys and Ken Kennerly, the tournament director of The Honda Classic and they have been amazing. The amount of players that had the ribbons on, I was just watching the coverage to see, is incredible. I actually spoke to Tiger today and thanked him for wearing the ribbon. We really appreciate it, told him I went to high school there. I mean the only thing he could say was that he was sorry, it’s an unfortunate scenario and he was happy to wear the ribbon, do whatever he could.”

Thompson is quick to note the help that he has received in his efforts.

“It’s not just me. My wife has been just as instrumental in getting this done as me. I just, fortunately, have the connection with the PGA Tour to move it in the right direction even faster. I have the luxury of having a larger platform that can get my words out and everything we’re trying to do faster than most people. It’s a subject near and dear to my heart so it was just literally perfect with The Honda Classic coming in town.”

Thompson has also been involved in fundraising that goes to help the survivors and victims’ families. GoFundMe accounts supported by Thompson and the PGA Tour have raised in excess of 2.1 million dollars in just a week.

“One of the most important uses for this money is counseling for victims, for these kids who witnessed this horrific event, or have one degree of separation,” Thompson said. “Counseling for kids who lost a friend or a classmate, who need counseling and to help them with their PTSD essentially. I think that’s one of the most important things is helping all these kids deal with what has happened.”

Thompson acknowledged the fact that the entire Parkland family is activated to help in the healing. As for his efforts, it’s the product of his recognition of just how fortunate his life has been and a heart for service.

“Golf has given so much to me that it was the perfect time to give back even more than I already have. It’s the best we can do. We’re just trying to make a difference. ”

Listen to the entire interview on a special edition of The 19th Hole with Michael Williams on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes!

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TG2: What irons did Knudson finally get fit into?

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GolfWRX equipment expert Brian Knudson gets his first ever iron fitting. He dishes about his favorite irons, some irons that didn’t work for him, and he discusses the wide array of shafts that he tried. And then, he reveals what irons and shafts he got fit into. His irons of choice may surprise you.

Check out the podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes!

jewkh

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