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USGA Distance Study: PGA Tour, PGA of America, Titleist respond

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The USGA and R&A’s annual Distance Report hit the golf mediaverse Monday. Now, responses from other industry powers are following in the report’s wake.

PGA Tour commissioner Jay Monahan wrote a letter to PGA Tour players offering his thoughts on the USGA’s findings

“Having carefully reviewed the data, we do not believe the trends indicate a significant or abnormal increase in distance since 2003 or from 2016 to 2017,” the commissioner stated.

Monahan pointed to fluctuations between seasons, increases in clubhead speed and bigger, stronger players.

“While this may seem significant when taken in isolation, it has not been uncommon over the past 15 years to see significant gains or losses. Since 2003, there have been three instances where a significant gain was recorded between years, and five instances where the average decreased. … There is a strong correlation between clubhead speed and the total distance gains seen since 2003. We believe this increase in clubhead speed is mostly attributable to a combination of factors, such as increased player athleticism and fitness, physical build of the player, enhancements in equipment fitting and the proliferation of launch-monitoring capabilities. It is interesting to note that since 2003, the average age of a Tour member has gone down and the average height has gone up.”

Titleist, industry leader in the golf ball space, also issued a response.David Maher, CEO and president of Titleist’s parent company, Acushnet, said:

“In any given year there are variables that impact distance, and any movement as in 2017 is not suddenly indicative of a harmful trend. We continue to believe equipment innovation has benefitted golfers at all levels, and our analysis of the 2017 Distance Report affirms that the USGA and R&A have effective regulations in place to ensure the game’s health and sustainability.”

Titleist points out that removing new venues from the equation, distance gains were only 0.5 yards at the 33 events held at the same courses in 2015-2016 and 2017-2018. In fact, Titleist points out, at 15 of the 33 PGA Tour events contested at the same venue the past two season, distance decreased. The company also highlights the outlier of the more than 20-yard increase at U.S. Open venues (Oakmont in 2016, Erin Hills in 2017).

“A closer look into the numbers in the report underscores the complexity of making any meaningful year-to-year comparison. There were several contributing variables in 2017, including course selection and setup, agronomical conditions and weather, which need to be considered when assessing the data.”

Read Titleist’s full response and research here. 

Per Golf Digest PGA of America CEO, Pete Bevacqua also expressed skepticism.

“Having just received the full report last evening, it is difficult for us at the PGA of America to provide meaningful comments on its content at this time. However, given the recent industry discussions and media reports regarding a potential roll back of the golf ball for all players and/or a segment of elite players, our Board of Directors has discussed this topic at length. Based on the information we have seen, we are highly skeptical that rolling back the golf ball in whole or part will be in the best interests of the sport and our collective efforts to grow the game.’

Bevacqua indicated the PGA of America will poll its nearly 29,000 PGA Pros this week to get their feedback before issuing a full response.

We’ll continue to monitor substantial responses as the debate continues.

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19 Comments

19 Comments

  1. G March

    Mar 8, 2018 at 8:31 pm

    Doesn’t Merion prove a point that you don’t have to limit technology to challenge the pro’s? Look at the finishing scores of the 2013 USOpen. Justin Rose won it with a +1. Course design will keep the bombers under control. If they can bomb it down the middle then all the better. But if they miss the fairway then they should not be able to advance it the way they can. Short rough is not enough of a penalty. Merion was considered a short track and the couch coaches all said they were going the shredd the “short” course. Well it didn’t work out that way did it?
    All the best.
    G

  2. Robert Parsons

    Mar 8, 2018 at 1:27 am

    Put restrictions on the players. Nobody under 35 years old. Must be under 5’10”. Players can not take full backswing. And tees must not stick out of the ground more than 1 inch.

  3. Charlie

    Mar 7, 2018 at 11:40 am

    Why not use Iron Byron to test the balls and the equipment at the same courses (3 should suffice) at the same time (not hard since tournaments generally happen at the same time each year). If the balls and clubs make no difference; why do so many people waste their money upgrading so often? Of course, the tour players are better, stronger and have their clubs custom made for their swings. If the ability of the great players is accentuated to the point that the average golfer can’t feel a relationship between the tour players and themselves, that could be the end of a viable golf industry. I am a member of the USGA but am starting to believe that the relationship to the game is more liked that of the NRA; that is they represent the manufacturers more than the average golfer.

  4. HDTVMAN

    Mar 7, 2018 at 11:20 am

    The USGA reminds me of the NCAA…both need to be replaced! Listening to Hank Haney yesterday on his Sirius/XM show, the USGA is so far out of touch with the game of golf it’s not funny! Don’t they test the balls, clubs, and measure the length of putters??? Oh well, gotta get my feathery, hickory sticks, and this brand new sandy wedge this guy Sarazen is using…got a tee time at 1pm.

  5. Tom54

    Mar 7, 2018 at 11:18 am

    If the golf ball and the clubs are already maxed out to their legal limits then there has to be other factors for the ball to be traveling too long. Players are bigger and stronger than ever. Every course for the events are tried to be firm and fast. That obviously means more roll out on tee balls. Until these great players are shooting 59s every week no need for changes. Every golfer alive realizes there are way too many variables that go into a score in golf. Hitting the ball further is just one factor. If ball is restricted the bombers will still be longer than the rest. That’s their skill, no matter what.

  6. Jeffrey Fish

    Mar 7, 2018 at 11:10 am

    The USGA is trying to craft a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist.

  7. Chris M.

    Mar 7, 2018 at 9:54 am

    It appears that the USGA is searching for a way
    to remain relevant. They have run Erin Hills up the flag pole and have noted the 20 yard increase in driving distance. Yet, it was the USGA and not any new ball that contributed to distance jump. Some players had complained about the difficulty of Erin Hills during the practice rounds. Suddenly, the. USGA orders that acres and acres of high fescue be mowed to create the widest fairways in all of creation. Then they have the audacity to complain about how far everyone is driving the ball. Disgusting!

  8. 1putt

    Mar 6, 2018 at 5:46 pm

    I am looking in the attic for my black & white tv.. this is the result of great junior programs, extensive high school programs, and a collegiate schedule that provides year round as well as world wide experience.

  9. Robert Najarian

    Mar 6, 2018 at 4:46 pm

    How much are the club manufactures paying for these ignorant replies. The last 40 years they’ve ruined the game of golf. Why don’t we go back to persimmon Woods a lot of balls then tell me what the difference is the game I love has become a joke. Even a sport like baseball that allows its players to use drugs outlawed the aluminum bats why doesn’t golf do the same

    • Dr Insight

      Mar 7, 2018 at 6:23 am

      It’s the fault of technology; the world was of course a much better place before the invention of the wheel let alone the jet engine. Coping with change is something that few of us can actually embrace.

  10. Richard Ramon

    Mar 6, 2018 at 4:18 pm

    Golf is like any other sport. Players today are bigger stronger and faster. Get over it little men of the USGA, it’s not the ball.

  11. A T Meeks

    Mar 6, 2018 at 2:17 pm

    Meant USGA not PGA.
    Sorry

  12. A T Meeks

    Mar 6, 2018 at 1:38 pm

    Pga reminds me of Hollywood. Out of touch with the real world. They think way too much of themselves.
    LEAVE US ALONE

  13. DD

    Mar 6, 2018 at 12:53 pm

    i dont see where the problem is. There are plenty of tournament courses long enough tough enough. The golden bear doesnt have to build every course to host a tournament especially as hundreds of courses are closed each year. im a 2 cap and a long ball hitter. i rarely play tips and never see anyone else playing tips ever. much less clamoring for longer courses. half the courses i play even the nicer ones dont even have tee markers longer than 6500 out even if they are mowing the 6800….what problem are the trying to fix. Rolling back the ball only for tour player will hurt the pga. no one wants pros playing a different ball. no one will be wowed by their distance anymore. no one will be able to compare their drives to the pros(as i like to) no one will be able to compare their ability to the pros. all of that will be over. They will be completely separating the professional league from the consumer. good luck with that.

    • Richard Ramon

      Mar 6, 2018 at 4:15 pm

      Indeed. Why does the LPGA not attract fans like the PGA? Because good players don’t see shots on the LPGA that they couldn’t hit at one point in their life or another. Dustin Johnson having a yap in for eagle on a 421 yard par 4 is incomprehensible. The USGA has outlived their time. I can’t stand the USGA any more. They Ruin the US Open every year with their egos.

  14. Stump

    Mar 6, 2018 at 10:11 am

    The USGA wants to roll the ball back…now they are using stats that support that position. As Mark Twain said: there are lies, damned lies and statistics.

    • DB

      Mar 6, 2018 at 1:54 pm

      Exactly. And if they are including outliers that show 20+ yard increases (due to agronomy – I saw those fairways at the US Open and The Open) then the statistics are pretty much flawed.

  15. Dr Troy

    Mar 6, 2018 at 9:59 am

    Thank you….At least weve got someone with common sense. And I dont mean Mike Davis….

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Why the R&A tested 30 players’ drivers at The Open

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Yesterday in the Morning 9, we discussed Tim Rosaforte’s report that the R&A randomly tested 30 players drivers for COR conformance at the British Open.

It seems, however, that while the drivers were randomly chosen, players knew the testing was coming. According to Golf Channel’s Rex Hoggard, both players and OEMs were notified three weeks ago that the R&A intended to check drivers.

Traditionally, the R&A and USGA test COR on clubs from manufacturers, not players’ gamers.

“We take our governance role very seriously, not just on the Rules of Golf and amateur status, but also equipment standards, and we felt it was an appropriate next step to more actively seek to test players’ drivers straight out of the bag,” Martin Slumbers, the R&A’s chief executive, told Golf Channel.

Paul Casey, Brooks Koepka, Jason Day, and Henrik Stenson were among those tested (should’ve tested Stenson’s 3-wood!). No violations were reported at the practice range test center.

Interestingly/conspiracy alert: Rory McIlroy floated the idea that TaylorMade (his equipment sponsor, was “singled out a bit more than anyone else.”

“A manufacturer is always going to try and find ways to get around what the regulations are. It’s a bit of an arms race,” McIlroy said.

That said, randomness or the size of TaylorMade’s market share could account for number of M3 and M4s tested, rather than being “singled out” as McIlroy suggested.

While this is the first such testing at The Open, the R&A apparently tested drivers at a Japan Golf Tour event earlier this year.

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GolfWRX Morning 9: The eternal allure of Tiger Woods | Lincicome vs. the guys | A pair of passings

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By Ben Alberstadt (ben.alberstadt@golfwrx.com)

 

July 18, 2018

Good Wednesday morning, golf fans.
1. “Box office” Woods
As he prepares for his return to the British Open, all eyes are on Tiger Woods. Sure, there are Woods’ usual detractors, and those who wish the media would focus more on other players, so it may be more accurate to say–many eyes at Carnoustie are on Tiger physically.
  • The BBC’s Tom English had this to say about merely getting to Woods’ press conference.
  • “When Woods is on his way to the interview room, media folk grow extra legs. They exit their seat like a greyhound from the traps and whizz past you in a blur. Lesson one about covering a major championship: don’t get in the way of a man on his way to a Tiger press conference. Dawdle and you’re dead. Roadkill.”
  • “Woods had a captive audience. We were literally queuing out the door. For reigning Open champion Jordan Spieth on Monday – a healthy attendance at his press conference, but not full. For Masters champion Patrick Reed – a decent turnout. For US Open champion Brooks Koepka – a respectable crowd. For Woods, a stampede.”
  • He said this of the endless scribe and fan interest in Woods…”Put simply, we will never get over Tiger. For good and bad, he is imbedded in our hearts and minds. People wonder whether he can pull off a miracle and win this week – or any week when there’s a major on the line. The miracle isn’t exclusively about him winning, it’s about us wanting him to win. That’s a miraculous event in itself. Despite everything that he has done, we’re still rooting for him ahead of most, if not, all of the field?”
2. Lincicome vs. the guys
Helen Ross checks on Brittany Lincicome as she prepares to tee it up at the Barbasol.
  • “Ten years, to be exact. When Lincicome steps to the 10th tee at 9:59 a.m. ET on Thursday, she’ll become the sixth woman to play in a TOUR event, joining Wie, who was the last, Annika Sorenstam, Suzy Whaley, Shirley Spork and Babe Didrikson Zaharias.”
  • “And Lincicome, who is playing with Sam Ryder and Conrad Shindler, plans to soak it all in. “To be playing in the practice round today, hitting on the driving range, it’s kind of surreal,” Lincicome said. “I just can’t stop smiling. … I can’t wait until Thursday.”
  • “Lincicome has won eight times on the LPGA Tour and played in six Solheim Cups. She narrowly missed getting her ninth victory on Sunday, too, when a birdie putt did a 340-degree spin out of the hole and Lincicome ended up losing on the first hole of sudden death.”
  • “Lincicome’s average driving distance, measured on two holes each week, is 269.520 yards, which ranks her 10th on the LPGA. That’s just 6 yards out of No. 1 – but outside the top 200 on the PGA TOUR.”
3. A pair of passings: Marcia Chambers and Mark Hayes
The golf world lost a fine pair: Marcia Chambers and Mark Hayes.
  • John Strege writes of Chambers: “Marcia Chambers, a Golf Digest contributor who was on the leading edge of writing about gender and race discrimination in golf, died last Friday at Smilow Cancer Hospital in New Haven, Conn. She was 78.
  • “Chambers, a Senior Research Scholar in Law at Yale Law School, received the American Bar Association’s Silver Gavel Award for her series of Golf Digest articles dealing with gender and race discrimination in golf.
  • “She initially was asked to address discrimination against women in private clubs, but that was tabled when Shoal Creek and its founder Hall Thompson brought race to the fore in the runup to the PGA Championship in 1990.”
  • Jim McCabe on Mark Hayes…“Hayes, whose win at the 1977 PLAYERS was the last of three PGA TOUR wins in a solid 19-year career, died Monday at the age of 69 in Edmond, Oklahoma. Hayes’ death was confirmed by his oldest brother, Larry Hayes, the General Manager at TPC Craig Ranch in McKinney, Texas. He was 69 and had been ill for more than a year.”
4. Fun with skins

An unbylined AP report on some practice round antics at Carnoustie and more from the SB2K crew…in this case a Michael Greller-Justin Thomas bet that he could make par on a hole using just an 8-iron.

  • “The challenge was for Thomas to make par using only an 8-iron…Once he got it in the fairway, Spieth came over to advise him how to navigate the pot bunkers more than 200 yards away. The ball stopped rolling, finally, about a yard short of a bunker to the left of the green. Getting it over the bunker with that club was going to be a problem.”
  • ‘”Where’s my caddie?” Thomas said in mock panic…Spieth was preparing to hit a bunker shot on the other side of the fairway when he looked over and said, “Sorry,” then ran to Thomas for more consultation. He told Thomas to open the face of the 8-iron and slide it under the firm turf. Spieth pointed to a spot on the slope beyond the bunker. Greller watched nervously as Thomas pulled it off to perfection, the ball rolling out to 3 feet…With the leading edge of the 8-iron, he knocked it in for a 4. And then, as usual, they all debated the size of the bet.”
5. The Golf Engine predicts…
Pat Ross and his Golf Engine predict the top 25 finishers at The Open.

 

How does it work? “In this model, we use machine learning to evaluate 1,500 different statistics for every golfer on the PGA Tour over each tournament since 2004. The analysis of this massive dataset allows gives us an opportunity to predict players that are sitting on low round scores.”
  • A taste…”The field for the 147th British Open is set at the historic Carnoustie Golf Links. The Golf Engine modeled over 1,500 statistics tracked by the PGA Tour for every tournament dating back to 2004. We looked at how each stat contributes to what we can expect from players on this stage, at this tournament. It’s a complex web of information that can only be properly analyzed by a machine, yet yields some objectively surprising results.”
  • “This year’s British Open is no exception as the model is calling for Webb Simpson (125/1 odds) to make a run into the top 10 at least.”
  • Some surprises…Back-to-back U.S. Open winner Brooks Koepka (22/1) inside the top 5…Webb Simpson (125/1) and Phil Mickelson (66/1) inside the top 10….Emiliano Grillo (100/1) inside the top 15…Kevin Na (175/1), Luke List (125/1), and Ryan Moore (150/1) inside top the 25.”:
  • “Perhaps just as surprising are the golfers that may under-perform this week. Rory McIlroy and Tommy Fleetwood don’t make the top 10 cutoff. Alex Noren, Francesco Molinari who finished T2 at TPC Deere Run last week, and Sergio Garcia are all projected outside of our top 25.”

 

6. Confessions of  Yipper
More specifically, a confession from Kevin Na that he contracted a strain of the yips.
  • “I went through the yips. The whole world saw that. I told people, ‘I can’t take the club back,'” Na said on Tuesday at Carnoustie. “People talked about it, ‘He’s a slow player. Look at his routine.’ I was admitting to the yips. I didn’t use the word ‘yip’ at the time. Nobody wants to use that word, but I’m over it now so I can use it. The whole world saw it.”
  • “It took time,” he said. “I forced myself a lot. I tried breathing. I tried a trigger. Some guys will have a forward press or the kick of the right knee. That was hard and the crap I got for it was not easy.”
7. Hello again, John Peterson
He’s back! (Sort of). Golfweek’s Kevin Casey (former GolfWRX writer!) with the details.
  • “It was less than two weeks ago that John Peterson seemed to say farewell after he just missed out on conditional status following the end of his major medical extension…The 29-year-old had for months stated that if he did lose his PGA Tour status by the end of the medical, he would retire and go into real estate development. After his lost status came to fruition, Peterson seemed to indicate he was indeed going through with this plan.”
  • “But now – at least for one week – he’s back…Despite having no status, Peterson was on the alternate list for the Barbasol Championship – the opposite-field event being played during Open Championship week…He quickly moved up the alternates, too, due to field changes and has now earned a spot in the event!”
  • “How did he get in this field? Peterson apparently earned his spot via being in the “50 finishers beyond 150 on prior season’s money list through Wyndham Championship” category.”
8. BioMech and the future of putting analysis
Michael Williams chatted with the CEO of BioMech Golf among others. BioMech Golf is, well, I’ll let Michael tell you…
  • “A couple of years ago, Dr. Frank Fornari and BioMech created a stir with the BioMech Acculock ACE putter, a radical new putter design that integrated the principles of biometrics, the science of motion. The putter was designed to be used with a specific type of putting stroke that would be proven by the BioMech team to be the ideal method for putting. The putter developed a cult following, but the BioMech team is back with a tool that just might break into the mainstream.”
  • “Fornari’s team has developed the BioMech putting sensor and app. The sensor attaches to any putter and transmits data about each putt to an app that can run on any iPhone or iPad. It provides key data on what the player is doing, when they are doing it and why they are doing it, making the BioMech sensor effective whether you are a player, an instructor or even a manufacturer. With the golf industry driven more than ever by technology, the BioMech sensor could become as essential to putting and the short game as Trackman is to the full swing.”

 

9. Phil’s phantastic flop
Do yourself a favor if you haven’t checked out Phil Mickelson’s insane full-swing flop from a tight lie over the head of a man two yards in front of him. Imagine trying this shot? Heck, fluff up the grass and place the ball perfectly, and you’re still killing the guy or robbing him of his ability to father children. Mickelson’s short game is a trope that gets more discussion than it should, but this is just crazy.

 

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British Open 2018 odds: Dustin Johnson, Rickie Fowler, Justin Rose, Rory McIlroy favored

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Insert your preferred obligatory remark about whether you call this week’s major championship at Carnoustie “The Open Championship” or “the British Open” here. Now that we’ve gotten that out of the way, let’s get down to the notoriously difficult business of golf futures betting.

The No. 1 golfer in the world, considering his recent form is respectable and he is, you know, the No. 1 golfer in the world, is tops at the books. Justin Rose (16/1), Rickie Fowler (16/1), Rory McIlroy (18/1), and Jordan Spieth (20/1) round out the top four at Bovada. Tiger Woods is at 22/1, along with Tommy Fleetwood, Brooks Koepka, Jon Rahm, and Justin Thomas. Phil Mickelson is 66/1.

Odds to win The Open Championship 2018 (@Bovada, 7/17)

Dustin Johnson 12/1

Rickie Fowler 16/1

Justin Rose 16/1

Rory McIlroy 18/1

Jordan Spieth 20/1

Tommy Fleetwood 22/1

Brooks Koepka 22/1

Jon Rahm 22/1

Justin Thomas 22/1

Tiger Woods 22/1

Sergio Garcia 28/1

Henrik Stenson 28/1

Alex Noren 30/1

Jason Day 33/1

Francesco Molinari 33/1

Patrick Reed 35/1

Paul Casey 40/1

Branden Grace 40/1

Tyrrell Hatton 40/1

Marc Leishman 45/1

Hideki Matsuyama 50/1

Matthew Fitzpatrick 60/1

Russell Knox 66/1

Phil Mickelson 66/1

Ian Poulter 66/1

Thomas Pieters 75/1

Matt Kuchar 80/1

Louis Oosthuizen 80/1

Bubba Watson 80/1

Patrick Cantlay 100/1

Tony Finau 100/1

Emiliano Grillo 100/1

Zach Johnson 100/1

Thorbjorn Olesen 100/1

Rafael Cabrera Bello 125/1

Bryson DeChambeau 125/1

Ryan Fox 125/1

Haotong Li 125/1

Luke List 125/1

Adam Scott 125/1

Webb Simpson 125/1

Matthew Southgate 125/1

Lee Westwood 125/1

Paul Dunne 150/1

Brian Harman 150/1

Charley Hoffman 150/1

Shane Lowry 150/1

Ryan Moore 150/1

Xander Schaufflele 150/1

Brandt Snedeker 150/1

Brandon Stone 150/1

Andy Sullivan 150/1

Danny Willett 150/1

Chris Wood 150/1

Kevin Na 175/1

Eddie Pepperell 175/1

Byeonghun AN 200/1

Kiradech Aphibarnrat 200/1

Daniel Berger 200/1

Ross Fisher 200/1

Dylan Frittelli 200/1

Padraig Harrington 200/1

Russell Henley 200/1

Martin Kaymer 200/1

Charl Schwartzel 200/1

Cameron Smith 200/1

Kyle Stanley 200/1

Jordan Smith 225/1

Alexander Bjork 250/1

Jorge Campillo 250/1

Stewart Cink 250/1

Jason Dufner 250/1

Beau Hossler 250/1

Pat Perez 250/1

Julian Suri 250/1

Peter Uihlein 250/1

Jimmy Walker 250/1

Gary Woodland 250/1

Keegan Bradley 300/1

Nicolas Colsaerts 300/1

Cameron Davis 300/1

Retief Goosen 300/1

Michael Kim 300/1

Si Woo Kim 300/1

Alexander Levy 300/1

Ryan Armour 400/1

Kevin Chappell 400/1

George Coetzee 400/1

Jens Dantorp 400/1

Kevin Kisner 400/1

Anirban Lahiri 400/1

Matt Wallace 400/1

Shota Akiyoshi 500/1

Jonas Blixt 500/1

Danthai Boonma 500/1

Bronson Burgoon 500/1

Minchel Choi 500/1

Darren Clarke 500/1

Austin Cook 500/1

Sean Crocker 500/1

John Daly 500/1

Grant Forrest 500/1

Gavin Green 500/1

Chesson Hadley 500/1

Adam Hadwin 500/1

Michael Hendry 500/1

Lucas Herbert 500/1

Charles Howell III 500/1

Kodai Ichihara 500/1

Jazz Janewattananond 500/1

Matt Jones 500/1

Andrew Landry 500/1

Shaun Norris 500/1

Sang Hyun Park 500/1

Chez Reavie 500/1

Jovan Rebula 500/1

Brett Rumford 500/1

Brady Schnell 500/1

Jack Senior 500/1

Shubhankar Sharma 500/1

Brendan Steele 500/1

Ryuko Tokimatsu 500/1

Erik Van Rooyen 500/1

Oliver Wilson 500/1

Lin Yuxin 500/1

Ernie Els 750/1

Scott Jamieson 750/1

Sung Kang 750/1

Bernhard Langer 750/1

Jhonattan Vegas 750/1

Abraham Ancer 1000/1

Marcus Armitage 1000/1

Mark Calcavecchia 1000/1

Ben Curtis 1000/1

David Duval 1000/1

Nicolaj Hojgaard 1000/1

Yuta Ikeda 1000/1

Masahiro Kawamura 1000/1

Marcus Kinhult 1000/1

Patton Kizzire 1000/1

Masanori Kobayashi 1000/1

Satoshi Kodaira 1000/1

Jason Kokrak 1000/1

Kelly Kraft 1000/1

Tom Lewis 1000/1

Zander Lombard 1000/1

Haraldur Magnus 1000/1

James Robinson 1000/1

Hideto Tanihara 1000/1

Ashton Turner 1000/1

Miyazato Yusaku 1000/1

Fabrizio Zanotti 1000/1

Rhys Enoch 1500/1

Thomas Curtis 2500/1

Todd Hamilton 2500/1

Tom Lehman 2500/1

Sam Locke 2500/1

Sandy Lyle 2500/1

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