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The ferrule is one of the smallest parts of the golf club, but it’s also a telltale sign of a quality-built club. Ferrules come in many shapes and sizes, but they almost always need to be turned down to fit just right.

In this video, I demonstrate the proper technique to turn down a ferrule using a belt sander equipped with a fiber belt.

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Ryan Barath is a club fitter and master club builder who has more than 15 years experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour professionals. He studied business and marketing at the Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf located in Toronto. He now works independently from his home shop in Hamilton and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers, including True Temper. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf and share his passion for club building, wedge grinding, & craft beer.



  1. tim

    Mar 8, 2018 at 3:49 pm

    why do the ferrules move up on the shaft of my Callaway 3 wood and hybrid (graphite shafts)? They are still tight but there is a gap between the ferrule and hosel. Is this a performance issue?

    • Christopher

      Mar 10, 2018 at 6:39 pm

      No, they’re purely cosmetic. Either the glue wasn’t applied enough or it’s failed. Your local pro will probably glue them back if you ask. Sometimes the ferrule can be glued slightly too low and get pushed up towards the butt when the shaft is attached to the head or adapter, this can also cause a slight gap.

  2. Jasmine O’Leary

    Mar 3, 2018 at 8:38 pm

    Tiger has had his ferrule turned down a few times. Grind it up.

  3. John Quigley

    Mar 3, 2018 at 6:21 pm

    Ok, so- what is belt made of? Only one belt or coarse to finer? What speed is the machine running at? Does any compound need to be used before/during/after to bring up a shine? Does the hosel need to be protected, will the belt damage certain finishes? I’m left with more questions than answers from this video. Booo.

  4. Colin

    Mar 2, 2018 at 12:03 pm

    Why not just buy ferrules that fit?

    • Michael P. Ohaneson

      Mar 2, 2018 at 3:35 pm

      Hey, Colin. The ferrules will fit the shaft, but they are usually not flush with the hosel, so after epoxying the shaft to the club head, the ferrule will need to be turned down to have that nice, smooth finish.

  5. Joro

    Mar 2, 2018 at 11:09 am

    So I pick up a club, tell you I am going to show you how to turn a Furrel, and do it. In the meantime I really tell you nothing about what I am doing or how I am doing it. And that is informative ? Not a bit.

    The most important thing about sanding Plastic or wood for that matter is to turn the ferrule AGAINST the direction of the belt, which is backwards. That makes it clean and smooth. If you go with the belt it will melt the Plastic and it will turn into a lump and useless. Always against the direction of the belt, I know, I have done thousands of them.

    • peter collins

      Mar 2, 2018 at 2:10 pm

      tick v/g

    • Michael P. Ohaneson

      Mar 2, 2018 at 3:37 pm

      Good point. He did turn it correctly, but did not explain it as he should have and as you have done. Thanks!

  6. Todd

    Mar 1, 2018 at 1:01 pm

    Not saying he’s wrong, but that ferrule is already flush with the hosel.

    • joro

      Mar 5, 2018 at 2:27 pm

      Most ferrules are made to be flush. They are easy to buy the preparer size. If you don’t have a sanding belt use a paper like a 120 grit cut off a 2 inch strip and sand it down by hand and then clean it with Acetone and WALLAH, you’r a club tech.

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Rory McIlroy’s putter builder speaks on his winning TaylorMade Soto proto



It’s no secret that Rory McIlroy’s biggest weakness has historically been with his putter. But ahead of the Arnold Palmer Invitational, which he won by two shots, McIlroy made a putter switch and ended up with just 100 putts for the week — the lowest in his PGA Tour career. He also finished first in the field in Strokes Gained: Putting, and put on a putting display for the ages on Sunday to shoot 64 (he birdied 5 of the final 6 holes).

Related: Rory’s Winning WITB from the 2018 Arnold Palmer Invitational 

What’s so special about this putter? To figure that out, I spoke with TaylorMade’s International Tour Director Chris Trott, who worked directly with McIlroy on building his new putter.

Trott explains that McIlroy showed up to Bay Hill “with a different kind of confidence” that week. His caddie, Harry Diamond, showed up to the TaylorMade Tour Truck on Monday night (McIlroy wasn’t on site Monday) with a previous putter of McIlroy’s — a Scotty Cameron that he won multiple majors with, according to Trott — and he wanted to have a new putter built that matched up with the specs of it. “He came with a plan and he wanted to be on spec,” says Trott. So the TaylorMade team sent Harry off to the hotel Monday night with a TaylorMade TP Soto with no face insert, one with an insert, some other variations, and they sent him back to the hotel with a few Spiders, as well, according to Trott.

But since Trott says that McIlroy liked the feel of his previous gamer, Trott thought it was best to send a request back to TaylorMade’s offices in Carlsbad for a TP Black Copper Soto with a midslant neck and a Suryln insert in preparation for McIlroy’s arrival the next day. “Nine out of 10 times we already have a head with the insert in it [inside the tour truck], but this putter is so new,” says Trott. “It’s not even out yet.”

Trott says McIlroy showed up to the Tour Truck the next morning, but he “wasn’t enamored” with the options, although he did fancy the solid face Soto. Here’s the photo notes that Trott took of the solid-faced Soto that McIlroy liked.

Good thing Trott sent that request back to the office, though! The first words out of McIlroy’s mouth when he saw the new TP Black Copper Soto slant neck proto with the Suryln insert, according to Trott, were “Hmm, that’s nice.” But he wanted to tweak the specs. He wanted the putter an eighth of an inch shorter and 3-to-4 swingweight points lighter. Eventually, Trott also added 0.25 degrees of loft to the face compared to McIlroy’s gamer, and made it 1-degree more upright.

The new putter Trott concocted also had a Golf Pride Tradition grip on it, and McIlroy had him change it to a TaylorMade Red Cap Pistol grip.

So, McIlroy took to the putting green with the solid face Soto and the Black Copper slant neck proto with the Surlyn insert. After a few drills, McIlroy decided he liked the feel and look of the Trott concoction, and while he really liked the Black Copper finish, he did have concerns about how it would hold up in the weather.

In the end, McIlroy decided on the TaylorMade TP Black Copper Soto proto. Here are the photo notes that Trott took from inside the trailer while holding McIlroy’s (eventual) winning putter.

The numbers in the photo above mean the specs of McIlroy’s putter are as follows:

  • Weight: 508.3 grams
  • Swing weight: D1
  • Lie angle: 71.25 degrees
  • Loft: 2.75 degrees
  • Length: 34.25 inches

Here are photos that we shot of the putter on Tuesday of the 2018 WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play:

It’s safe to say McIlroy made the right decision for Bay Hill, and according to Trott, he’ll likely be sticking with the putter going forward. And if not, surely Trott and his team will be there with 7-10 more putter options for McIlroy to try out and hand-pick from. Must be nice to be Rory!

See what GolfWRX Members are saying about Rory’s putter in our forums.

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Spotted: Phil Mickelson’s Callaway Mack Daddy PM-Grind “2.0” prototype wedge



More than three years ago, Callaway released a Mack Daddy PM Grind — PM stands for Phil Mickelson — that had a raised toe section for a higher center of gravity. Mickelson liked the PM Grind wedges because the designs allowed him to get more spin on open-faced shots, and also because they created a low trajectory with more spin on square-faced shots, said Roger Cleveland in 2015.

Since 2015, Mickelson has been playing various lofts of Callaway Mack Daddy PM Grind wedges, and with various amounts of lead tape.

On Tuesday at the 2018 WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play event, however, we spotted a new Mack Daddy PM Grind “2.o” wedge in his bag that has a different look. Is this the introduction of a new wedge release from Callaway?!


We spoke to a Callaway representative who, in so many words, said this is just Phil being Phil and tinkering with equipment, not a product launch.

“This is a Phil-specific prototype version of the Mack Daddy PM-Grind Wedge,” said a Callaway representative. “We built it specifically for him. He likes to tweak his clubs, of course, and this is just an example of that. Always a tinkerer!”
We’ll be sure to update you on more information about the PM Grind 2.0 prototype wedge when we have it.
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Adidas launches special edition black Boost colorway



Adidas staffers will be collectively back in black at the WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play this Thursday.

The company announced special edition black colorways for its Tour360, Tour360 Knit, and Crossknit 2.0 models, which players will wear, along with head-to-toe black, at the match play competition.

Adidas Tour360

“Boost changed the game for players when we brought it into our golf category,” said Masun Denison, global footwear director, adidas Golf. “Now with the introduction of this special edition colored Boost, golfers can add another style option to their lineup while still enjoying the benefits that only Boost can deliver.”

Adidas partnered with BASF to develop the proprietary Boost technology, which offers cushioning via highly elastic thermoplastic urethane (TPU) pellets that are then fused together with heat and molded into the midsole shape for each specific model. Adidas cites energy return, unmatched cushioning and comfort along with long-lasting durability as the key benefits of the technology.

Adidas Tour360 Knit

The special edition black Boost colorway is available now and will only be featured in the Tour360 family: Tour360 ($210), Tour360 Knit ($190), Crossknit 2.0 ($160). Supplies are limited.

Adidas Crossknit 2.0

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