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Barnbougle Lost Farm: 20 Holes of Pure Joy

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Another early day in Tasmania, and we were exploring the Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw-design, Barnbougle Lost Farm. The course was completed in 2010, four years after the neighbor Barnbougle Dunes, resulting in much excitement in the world of golf upon opening.

Johan and I teed off at 10 a.m. to enjoy the course at our own pace in its full glory under clear blue skies. Barnbougle Lost Farm starts out quite easy, but it quickly turns into a true test of links golf. You will certainly need to bring some tactical and smart planning in order to get close to many of the pin positions.

The third hole is a prime example. With its sloping two-tiered green, it provides a fun challenge and makes you earn birdie — even if your tee and approach shots put you in a good position. This is one of the things I love about this course; it adds a welcome dimension to the game and something you probably don’t experience on most golf courses.

(C) Jacob Sjöman. jacob@sjomanart.com

The 4th is an iconic signature hole called “Sals Point,” named after course owner Richard Sattler’s wife (she was hoping to build a summer home on the property before it was turned into a golf course). A strikingly beautiful par-3, this hole is short in distance but guarded with luring bunkers. When the prevailing northwesterly wind comes howling in from the ocean, the hole will leave you exposed and pulling out one of your long irons for the tee shot. We left No. 4 with two bogeys with a strong desire for revenge.

Later in the round, we notice our scorecard had a hole numbered “13A” just after the 13th. We then noticed there was also an “18A.” That’s because Barnbougle Lost Farm offers golfers 20 holes. The designers believed that 13A was “too good to leave out” of the main routing, and 18A acts as a final betting hole to help decide a winner if you’re left all square. And yes, we played both 13A and 18A.

I need to say I liked Lost Farm for many reasons; it feels fresh and has some quirky holes including the 5th and the breathtaking 4th. The fact that it balks tradition with 20 holes is something I love. It also feels like an (almost) flawless course, and you will find new things to enjoy every time you play it.

The big question after trying both courses at Barnbougle is which course I liked best. I would go for Barnbougle Dunes in front of Barnbougle Lost Farm, mostly because I felt it was more fun and offered a bigger variation on how to play the holes. Both courses are great, however, offering really fun golf. And as I wrote in the first part of this Barnbougle-story, this is a top destination to visit and something you definitely need to experience with your golf friends if you can. It’s a golfing heaven.

Next course up: Kingston Heath in Melbourne.

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Since 2010, the tall Swede Jacob Sjöman has established himself as one of the premier golf course photographers in the world. Shooting from the ground, special high tripods, hanging out from helicopters and operating advanced drones, Jacob brings both fresh and amazing results to each project he undertakes. He has captured and left his own creative mark on some of the most recognized tracks around the world including Lofoten Links, Trump International Golf Links and now recently Gary Player's masterpiece in Bulgaria, Thracian Cliffs.

7 Comments

7 Comments

  1. Jack

    Feb 26, 2018 at 10:35 am

    The European Club in Ireland also has two extra holes.

  2. Craig

    Feb 25, 2018 at 3:31 pm

    Played these and the King Island courses in October with a few golf nut buddies, I would happily make that golf trip every year without a thought of going further afield. The whole Dunes v Lost Farm and Ocean Dunes v Cape Wickham conversations went for extended periods in the clubhouses afterward – with no definitive answer. I am with you Jacob, I liked Dunes myself, it felt more classically designed for golf strategy, others disagreed.

    • Jacob Sjoman

      May 24, 2018 at 5:01 am

      It is such a great golf experience to visit King Island / Tasmania, and to play all of these wonderful courses makes it even more special. I guess that conversation about which course is the best of Barnbougle Dunes vs Barnbougle Lost Farm and Cape Wickham vs Ocean Dunes will go on forever – and I absolutely love that. If you play all these 4 courses you will have your own favorite and I believe all 4 of them will be named as number one from different golfers. Have a nice day Craig and I hope we bump into eachother while visiting some of these courses in the future!

  3. Duncan Marc

    Feb 25, 2018 at 10:35 am

    There appears to be surf potential on that headland…..

  4. Porker

    Feb 24, 2018 at 5:52 pm

    Man…. Don’t tell the yanks! Keep it our secret ????

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Hidden Gem of the Day: Swope Memorial Golf Course in Kansas City

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These aren’t the traditional “top-100” golf courses in America, or the ultra-private golf clubs you can’t get onto. These are the hidden gems; they’re accessible to the public, they cost less than $50, but they’re unique, beautiful and fun to play in their own right. We recently asked our GolfWRX Members to help us find these “hidden gems.” We’re treating this as a bucket list of golf courses to play across the country, and the world. If you have a personal favorite hidden gem, submit it here! 

Today’s Hidden Gem was submitted by GolfWRX member CVC (with a +1 from sabram), and it’s called Swope Memorial Golf Course in Kansas City. Here’s why it was submitted, according to CVC:

“This A.W. Tillinghast design sits on hills in the middle of Swope Park in Kansas City. A municipal course managed by Orion Management Systems, it offers amazing view of the Kansas City skyline, typical Tillinghast guarded greens that reward good shots by funneling the ball toward the hole. Opened in 1935, it features mature trees and elevation changes that make it a pleasure to play.”

According to the Swope Memorial website, prices range from $17 during Twilight hours, to $50 during peak hours on the weekends.

Check out more photos of the course below (provided by GolfWRX user sabram), and click here to enter your favorite local hidden gem!

Click here to enter your favorite local hidden gem!

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Hidden Gem of the Day: Sand Creek Station in Newton, Kansas

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These aren’t the traditional “top-100” golf courses in America, or the ultra-private golf clubs you can’t get onto. These are the hidden gems; they’re accessible to the public, they cost less than $50, but they’re unique, beautiful and fun to play in their own right. We recently asked our GolfWRX Members to help us find these “hidden gems.” We’re treating this as a bucket list of golf courses to play across the country, and the world. If you have a personal favorite hidden gem, submit it here! 

Today’s Hidden Gem is called Sand Creek Station located in Newton, Kansas, and it was submitted by GolfWRX Member grandslambound. Here’s why the course was submitted…

“This place is pure. Host of the 2014 U.S. Pub Links Championship, and last years NJCAA Jayhawk conference championship. Played it a couple weeks ago for $28 bucks with a cart and 2 drink tickets. It is a big 7359 from the tips and the wind is always whipping. The 10th hole is with out a doubt the signature hole, a 640 yard par 5 with water left and OB right on the tee shot and the water right and OB left on any lay-up or approach. This hole is so cocky they give you a free tee shirt if you birdie it. (Doug Ghim eagled it in the 2014 US Pub Links final round) It includes many great architecture elements including a redan green on the par 5 4th. Not to mention how great of condition it was in when I played it as well. This place is a steal.”

He’s not kidding. According to Sand Creek Station’s website, the course ranges from $24 to $49, and those prices include cart and range balls.

Check out more photos of the course below, and if you have a Hidden Gem (under $50) you think belongs on our list, submit it here!

Submit your favorite local course under $50 here!

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Hidden Gem of the Day: Cedar Crest, home of the 1927 PGA Championship

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These aren’t the traditional “top-100” golf courses in America, or the ultra-private golf clubs you can’t get onto. These are the hidden gems; they’re accessible to the public, they cost less than $50, but they’re unique, beautiful and fun to play in their own right. We recently asked our GolfWRX Members to help us find these “hidden gems.” We’re treating this as a bucket list of golf courses to play across the country, and the world. If you have a personal favorite hidden gem, submit it here! 

Today’s hidden gem, submitted by GolfWRX Member Simp, is called Cedar Crest Golf Course in Dallas, Texas. If you’re a golf historian, you may recognize the course (formerly known as Cedar Crest Country Club) as the host of the 1927 PGA Championship. That was back when the PGA Championship was a match play event, and in the 1927 competition, Walter Hagen defeated Joe Turnesa 1up.

Today, according to Cedar Crest’s website, rates range from $13 to $48 dollars depending on time of day and the season, which has to make it one of the most affordable major championship venues to play in the world.

Check out more photos of the course, submitted by GolfWRX Member Simp, below, And if you have a Hidden Gem (under $50) you want to submit, click here.

Submit your favorite local Hidden Gem here.

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