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The second of these two moves gets a lot of golfers in trouble. The reason being it requires a high level of skill and rotation to be able to pull it off naturally. If it’s not done as a natural result of the rotation, it then becomes forced. Once you start to force this move… bad things usually follow.

Make sure you watch Part 1 of “Shallowing the Club: Two Moves to Avoid” if you haven’t already. 

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Athletic Motion Golf is a collaboration of four of golf's brightest and most talented instructors who came together with the sole purpose of supplying golfers the very best information and strategies to lower their scores. At AMG, we're bringing fact-based instruction that's backed by research and proven at the highest levels on the PGA Tour straight to golfers through our website. Our resources will help you "clear the fog" in your game and understand the essentials of playing great golf.

9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. STEVE

    Jun 18, 2018 at 11:07 am

    Further proof that golf professionals cannot agree on golf swing fundamentals — especially the transition from back to down swing. An aussie pro named Bradley Hughes (not well known, I realize) with his own video series is a strong proponent of moving the hands OUT and seemingly away from the body to start the downswing. It flattens the club, and while there is the illusion your hands are out away, as he puts it “out is down” vs. traditional teaching which is supposed to drop the club into the slot, actually creates a hitting zone where the golfer is trapped. It’s interesting stuff and when done correctly, has me hitting the ball more solidly than I did 20 years ago. Seemingly counter to what is featured in this video….no surprise.

  2. Scott Ivlow

    Jun 12, 2018 at 12:26 am

    There is nothing in these videos that explaines how to shallow the club the right way. I don’t need 2 over complicated computer graphic videos that tells me nothing on how to do it. Thank God for Clay Ballard. He can demonstrate perfectly on the correct method on how any amateur can shallow the club far better than this guy can with with his mumbo jumbo golf videos that only gives the viewer a headache before the completion of the second video. If anyone on here wants to learn how to shallow the club like a pro go to youtube and search Top Speed Golf. Shallowing the Club. See how it’s done with a human body.

  3. Geohogan

    Jun 11, 2018 at 1:56 pm

    If golf instructors understood how the subconscious works, they would provide positive ‘to do’ instruction, not tell us what not to do..

    Our subconscious controls all motion and subconscious cannot do a negative. It cannot, not do something.
    if intention is ‘dont smoke’ our subconscious drops the ‘dont’ and intention becomes ‘smoke’
    Dont drink and drive, becomes drink and drive. Tell a two year old not to put his shoes on the couch and you know the ending.

    What ever you do, dont think about a pink elephant. you wont be able to get a pink elephant out of your mind. two moves to avoid … becomes the pink elephant.

  4. Ted

    Jun 11, 2018 at 9:11 am

    What is the name of your website

  5. ogo

    Jun 9, 2018 at 2:45 am

    Excellent scientifically-based video that virtually eliminates eyeballing by instructors. Force plates plus 3D video uncovers golf swing faults and fixes.
    Scientific data obsoletes every instructor dependent on subjective observations of the golfswing. Scientific instrumentation has revealed objective golfswing dynamics previously unknown to all the old teachers.

  6. Geohogan

    Jun 8, 2018 at 8:05 pm

    Intent to square the clubface with the hands, which freezes the hips and shoulders at impact.

    Correct pivot and intent to square clubface with torso rotation will result in shallowing of the golf club in DS, with open hips and shoulders at impact. Flexibility and fitness has nothing to do with open hips and shoulders at impact.

    • ogo

      Jun 9, 2018 at 2:48 am

      Flexiblity and fitness allows open hips and shoulders at impact because it’s the X-Factor that allows the Kinetic Chain to function properly. If hips and shoulders rotate in unison you are arming the DS rather than swinging freely.

  7. James

    Jun 8, 2018 at 3:15 pm

    Pro number three looks a little like Louis Oosthuizen

    • James T

      Jun 9, 2018 at 2:55 pm

      Amateur #1 looks a little like me but I usually wear more clothes.

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Instruction

How to eliminate the double cross: Vertical plane, gear effect and impact location

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One of the biggest issues teachers see on the lesson tee is an out-to-in golf swing from a player who is trying to fade the ball, only to look up and see the deadly double cross! This gear effect assisted toe hook is one of the most frustrating things about trying to move the ball from left to right for the right-handed golfer. In this article, I want to show you what this looks like with Trackman and give you a few ways in which you can eliminate this from your game.

Below is the address position of a golfer I teach here in Punta Mita; his handicap ranges between scratch and 2, depending on how much he’s playing, but his miss is a double cross when he’s struggling.

Now let’s examine his impact position:

Observations

  • You see a pull-hooking ball flight
  • The hands are significantly higher at impact than they were at address
  • If you look at the clubhead closely you can see it is wide open post impact due to a toe hit (which we’ll see more of in a second)
  • The face to path is 0.5 which means with a perfectly centered hit, this ball would have moved very slightly from the left to the right
  • However, we see a shot that has a very high negative spin axis -13.7 showing a shot that is moving right to left

Now let’s look at impact location via Trackman:

As we can see here, the impact of the shot above was obviously on the toe and this is the reason why the double-cross occurred. Now the question remains is “why did he hit the ball off of the toe?”

This is what I see from people who swing a touch too much from out-to-in and try to hit fades: a standing up of the body and a lifting of the hands raising the Vertical Swing Plane and Dynamic Lie of the club at impact. From address, let’s assume his lie angle was 45 degrees (for simplicity) and now at impact you can see his Dynamic Lie is 51 degrees. Simply put, he’s standing up the shaft during impact…when this happens you will tend to pull the heel off the ground at impact and this exposes the toe of the club, hence the toe hits and the gear effect toe hook.

Now that we know the problem, what’s the solution? In my opinion it’s a three stage process:

  1. Don’t swing as much from out-to-in so you won’t stand up as much during impact
  2. A better swing plane will help you to remain in your posture and lower the hands a touch more through impact
  3. Move the weights in your driver to promote a slight fade bias

Obviously the key here is to make better swings, but remember to use technology to your advantage and understand why these type of things happen!

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Instruction

Master your takeaway with force and torques

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Most golf swings last less than 2 seconds, so it’s difficult to recover from any errors in the takeaway. Time is obviously limited. What most golfers fail to realize is that the force and torque they apply to the club in the initial stages of the swing can have major effects on how they are able to leverage the club with their arms and wrists.

Our research has shown that it is best to see the golfer as a series of connected links with the most consistent golfers transferring motion smoothly from one link to another and finally to the club. Approximately 19-25 percent of all the energy created in a golf swing actually makes its way into the motion of the club. That means the remaining 75-80 percent is used up in moving the body segments. This emphasizes the fact that a smooth takeaway is your best chance sequence the body links and become more efficient with your energy transfers.

In the video above, I give a very important lesson on how the forces and torques applied by the golfer in the takeaway shape the rest of the swing. There will be more to come on the subject in future articles.

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Instruction

Learn from the Legends: Introduction

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There is a better way to swing the golf club. I’d prefer to write that there is a correct way to swing the club, but I know that really freaks people out. People love to talk about how everyone’s swing is different. “There are lots of ways to get it done,” they say. “Look at Jim Furyk’s swing – it’s not what you’d teach, but it works for him.”

To some extent, they’re right. Elite swings do have different looks. Some take it back inside (Ray Floyd). Some cross the line (Tom Watson). Some swings are long (Bubba Watson). Some are short (young Tiger). But these differences are superficial and largely irrelevant. When it comes to the engine – the core of the swing – the greatest players throughout the history of the game are all very similar.

Don’t believe me? Well, let me prove it to you. In this series of articles, I will do my best to show you – with pictures and videos and data – that the legends all move a specific way. Focusing on these elements (while ignoring others) and practicing a certain way is the surest path to improving your golf swing and lowering your scores.

So, let’s get into it. There are a number of important elements that all the legends have, but the biggest and most important of these elements is rotation. Every great player throughout the history of the game has had elite rotation. It’s the most important thing they do, and it’s easy to see. When you’re looking down the line at all the great players at impact, you’ll see hips and torso open.

This is what the legends look like at impact:

1Hips open
2Torso open
3Both butt cheeks visible
4Left leg extended and visible

And here’s what some very good players with less good rotation look like at impact:

These are very successful players (one of them is a major champion!), but they don’t move like the legends of the game.
1Hips and shoulders not open
2Left leg not totally visible
3Can’t see both butt cheeks

Now, there are plenty of nuances to how great players rotate. They do it while keeping spine flexion, for example, and they do it with very little (or no) lateral movement toward the target (lateral movement impedes rotation). I will discuss these things in detail. My hope is that at the end of this series you will have a much better understanding of what separates the legends from the very good… and from the rest of us.

You will understand their “engine,” and hopefully this understanding will help you begin to create your own legendary swing!

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