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A Q&A with Seven Dreamers about its $1,200 shafts

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We spotted Seven Dreamers at Demo Day at the PGA Show last year and were impressed by GolfWRX member chiromikey’s fitting experience in Japan. With the company expanding to the U.S. market, we wanted to dig a little deeper.

The Japanese company says that once you demo one of the its $1,200 shafts, you’ll see and feel its superiority to your current gamer. Fortunately for those interested, you’ll soon be able to do so at select fitters and green grass locations in the U.S.

Seven Dreamers is rooted in the aerospace industry. An interesting note: In 1998, the company was involved in the development of Japan’s “Hayabusa” spacecraft, the first and only unmanned craft to land on an asteroid and return to earth with a sample from the surface. The shafts are made in Tokyo by a team of craftsmen and scientists who collaborate to custom build each shaft. A point of differentiation: Seven Dreamers uses an autoclave pressure chamber in its manufacturing process. Other manufacturers cure their shafts in ovens. The company says this process produces superior quality carbon fibers, reduced resin, and eliminated the need for grinding, polishing, or painting.

For the U.S. and Canadian market, the company offers 33 different bend profiles, identified from thousands of fittings.

We spoke with Mike Rossi, Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Seven Dreamers.

GolfWRX: Tell us a little bit about the history of the company, as our readers likely aren’t too familiar with Seven Dreamers.

Mike Rossi: The company started back in 1957 under the name Super Resin. At that time they were into fiber-reinforced plastics…as time moved on, they got into composites (composite design, composite products). That led into aerospace involvement. So, there’s always been a precision, high-end focus. If you fast-forward to today, the company has three divisions. They launched the golf division in Japan in 2014. There’s also a medical division, which designed a disposable sleep apnea device…that’s been on sale in Europe and Japan for the past couple of years and is under FDA review here. And then there’s a third division: electronics…they’ve developed and patented the only fully automatic laundry folding robot.

The name came from…the chairman at the time, he envisioned seven centers of excellence throughout the world.

GolfWRX: Why a golf shaft?

MR: The company wants to leverage its expertise in composite material. They’re using a variety of specialty materials…the quality of which is fit for satellites. The premium-grade materials required prompted the interest in golf.

GolfWRX: What sets Seven Dreamers apart?

MR: What really sets us apart is the process. Every shaft is made on a mandrel, and our mandels are absolutely pristine. The material is placed by hand on the mandrel. It’s then inserted into a mold. Then we autoclave cure it. The beauty of autoclave curing is it’s done under pressure…which gives us outstanding compaction. It squeezes out all the unnecessary resin, so we get an optimal ratio of carbon fiber to resin, which improves both feel and energy transfer in the shaft. But the best part of the process is, once we remove the shaft from the mold, we literally trim it to length and wipe it down. The surface condition is perfect. So, we have no unbroken fibers. We have no fiber tears. We have no fiber bullets. All that contributes to incongruities and inconsistencies in the shaft.

Virtually every other manufacturer, they put their material on the mandrel, and then they use shrink tape. Then the shrink tape is removed after curing, and you’ve got the inconsistencies–the rough edges of the tape–so then everybody else grinds the profile. I’m not saying that’s a terrible way to do it, but I’m saying I believe our way is better, and there’s no one else that’s doing it the way we do.

GolfWRX: Talk a little bit about the company’s positioning in the shaft market…

MR: Our company decided we wanted to focus on the ultra-high-end. What they did in Japan to start out, they went out and obtained several hundred clubs that were on the market–primarily driver heads. They measured the inertial properties and the physical properties of all these heads just to understand how they performed, then they worked to develop shafts that were optimized for certain heads.

This really morphed into two what I’ll call “studios” in Tokyo where consumers can come in and hit balls on the simulator and try different shafts. The one they like best, whether it’s their gamer or ours, we place sensors on the shaft. Using our proprietary 3D system, we then measure their particular loading and how they deliver the clubhead…how the shaft performs during the swing. Then all those measurements are recorded, and we design them a shaft 100 percent custom. The process takes three to four weeks. It’s designed for the golfer and the particular head he chooses to play. So, it’s truly custom.

We’ve done thousands of those over the past few years, and the ticket on that is $2,500. So yes, it’s premium. It’s high-end. We believe the premium end is the last frontier in the golf space. We’re not trying to sell to everybody. We’re trying to identify high-end fitters. We’re looking at aspirational clientele who wants the best, highest-quality stuff out there.

GolfWRX: Tell us about the range of shafts…

MR: We go from the mid-to-low 40s in weight all the way up to the 80s with three different bend profiles, which are basically low-, mid-, and high-launch. Our U.S. product offering will contain 28 driver shafts to start. We have iron shafts in development, hybrid shafts too, which we’ll be adding. Our wood shaft’s MSRP is $1,200. Our main objective with the launch is to be able to fit a wide range of players: from amateurs to tour professionals.

GolfWRX: What can you tell us about any comparison testing you’ve done?

MR: As odd as this sounds, we don’t compare to existing shafts in the marketplace. Our history and experience is based on our analysis and the fittings we’ve done with players at all levels, and we’ve seen appreciable gains and improvements both in distance and dispersion. But we’re not out there to denigrate any of our competitors. That’s not what we’re about.

Back to the decision to enter the ultra-premium space more about a market opportunity or did it necessarily follow from the sophistication of the manufacturing process and materials?

It’s a combination of both. Certainly, we saw that niche. But with our costs and our structure, we’re not a commodity supplier…we selected a niche where we can succeed. So it’s high-end fitters and high-end facilities, but we’re also seeking OEM partners that want to enter that ultra-premium space.

GolfWRX: Are there any thoughts toward a presence on Tour?

MR: We will have a face of the brand. It will be a recognized, credible player. A proper driver of the golf ball…that search is underway, but we’re not going to do it the way it’s currently being done [tour van, large professional staff].

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5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. ogo

    Jul 21, 2018 at 1:42 am

    ****FANTASTICO****

  2. Ed

    Jan 31, 2018 at 1:14 pm

    There you have it fellow gearheads…. oven-baked graphite shafts are inferior to autoclave cured shafts because there is too much ‘plastic’ resin in the inferior shafts. Carbon graphite is a metal and has the dynamic properties of steel shafts less the weight.
    Cheap graphite shafts have inconsistent dynamic properties, particularly in the tip section during final release when the shaft is whip-snapping… drooping, torquing and recovering. One graphite manufacturer blends steel strands into their shafts. Steel is the gold standard and graphite shafts are soggy and floppy going through impact.
    That’s why tour pros prefer heavier weight shafts because the very low weight shafts were like spaghetti at high swing speeds.
    You can get away with heavy graphite shafts for irons but not light weight shafts for drivers. Light weight graphite shafts are adequate for slower swing speed recreational golfers, not for pros.

    • OB

      Feb 1, 2018 at 11:12 am

      Does that mean gearhead’s clubs are fitted with inferior epoxy-filled shafts that are unstable and ruin their swing release action? Pros use heavier weighted graphite shafts to compensate for shaft inconsistencies; shafts over 100 grams like Sadlowski using the 104 gram Nunchuk shaft mentioned in another WRX article.

      • Ed

        Feb 3, 2018 at 2:41 am

        Off your meds much. Conspiracy theory posts on almost every article and you reply to your own comments. Sad

        • OB

          Feb 5, 2018 at 11:41 am

          Where, oh where
          Have the gear heads gone?
          Where, oh where can they be?
          With shirts cut long
          And pants cut short
          Where, oh where can they be?
          I last saw them by the putting green
          Playing and puttering around
          But I just can’t see them anymore
          They just can’t seem to be found
          Perhaps the club pro over there will know
          He may have seen them go by
          But who knows where
          They might have decided to go away
          But we’ve got to give it a try

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Whats in the Bag

Tigers Woods WITB for each Masters win

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At its core, Tiger Woods’ equipment hasn’t changed by much over the better part of the last two decades. However, Tiger Woods’ equipment is constantly evolving, and there is no better tournament to witness that evolution than to take a peek into the equipment he used to win all five of his Masters Tournaments.

A couple of major notes to consider is Tiger used a steel-shafted driver playing less than 45 inches all the way up until the 2004 season when he finally made the move from his trusted Titleist 975D long after the rest of the PGA Tour had swapped in newer technology. It was still another two years before Tiger made the move to a 460cc driver head in the pursuit of greater ball speed and forgiveness.

Tiger also held onto his 2-iron for a long time, and up until a few years ago would rotate it in and out of the bag with a 5-wood. 2019 was the first major tournament Tiger won using a 5-wood instead of his trusted 2-iron.

Masters Winning Gear from 1997 – 2019

Tiger Woods WITB 1997 Masters

Winning Score: -18 bested his next closest competitor Tom Kite by 12 shots!

5101543P BAY HILLS INVIT''L

Driver: King Cobra Deep Face (9 degrees)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

3-wood: Titleist PT (15 degrees)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100 15

Irons: Mizuno MP-29 (2-4) and MP-14 (5-PW)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: Cleveland 588 RTG (Raw Tour Grind) (56, 60 degrees)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Putter: Scotty Cameron Newport TeI3

Ball: Titleist Professional 90

Tiger Woods WITB 2001 Masters

Winning Score: -16, beat David Duval by 2 shots and Phil Mickelson by 3.

Driver: Titleist 975D (7.5 degrees)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100 shaft

3-wood: 
Titleist 970 (15 degrees)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Irons: 
Titleist 681 Forged (2-PW)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: 
Titleist Vokey Design 200 Series (58 bent to 56 degrees, 6o degrees)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Putter: 
Scotty Cameron Newport 2 GSS

Ball: 
Nike Tour Accuracy TW

6502203P THE MASTERS X

Tiger Woods WITB 2002 Masters

Winning Score: -12, was 3 shots better than Retief Goosen and 4 better than Phil Mickelson

Driver: Nike Forged Titanium (8.5 degrees)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

3-wood: Titleist 970 (15 degrees)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Irons: Titleist 681 Forged Prototype (2-PW)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design 200 Series (58 bent to 56 degrees, 6o degree)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold S400

Putter:
 Scotty Cameron Newport 2 GSS

Ball:
 Nike Tour Accuracy TW

1805138SH010_Amex_Champs

Tiger Woods WITB 2005 Masters

Winning Score: Tiger beat Chris DiMarco in a playoff after they both tied at -12. The next closest golfers were Luke Donald and Retief Goosen at -5.

Driver: Nike Ignite 460cc (8.5 degrees)
Shafts: Mitsubishi Diamana 83 TX

3-wood: Nike T60 Ignite (15 degrees )
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana Blue 103 TX

Irons: Nike Forged Blades (2-PW)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: Nike Pro Combo (56 degrees), Nike Blade TW (60 degrees)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Putter: Scotty Cameron Newport 2 GSS

Ball: Nike One Platinum TW

Tiger Woods WITB 2019 Masters

Winning Score: -13, was one shot better than Brooks Koepka, Dustin Johnson, and Xander Schauffele.

Driver: TaylorMade M5 (9 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana D+ White 60 TX

3-wood: TaylorMade M5 (13 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana D+ White 70 TX

5-wood: TaylorMade M3 (19 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana D+ White 80 TX

Irons: TaylorMade P-7TW irons (3-PW)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: TaylorMade Milled Grind Raw (56 and 60 degrees)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Putter: Scotty Cameron Newport 2 GSS

Golf Ball: Bridgestone TourB XS

Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet Cord

 

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Equipment

The irons GolfWRXers with a 10-18 handicap are playing

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In our forums, WRXer ‘jjfcpa’ dedicated a thread to irons that fellow members with a handicap in the 10 to 18 range play. ‘Jjfcpa’ himself currently plays Callaway Apex CF19’s, and our members have been discussing the irons they currently play and why in our forums.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • tangojay: “Ping G-700, Alta CB graphite shafts, hitting them long, high and straight. Hitting them same distance and higher than my seven-year-old G-25’s with steel shafts, am 58.”
  • SouthLand: “Right now it’s a set of Cobra Amp Cells (~2013 GI), but I am in the process of upgrading. Need more spin on the ball, as I’m way below the desired range for spin metrics mainly. Pro thinks I could pick up some distance with improvement there. Driver too.”
  • Twinsgroupie: “Coming from Cobra Tour Forged and just ordered a set of PXG 0211’s. I tend to like a little bit more of a players iron than game improvement. Ball striking of the irons is better than my handicap would lead you to believe – let please not talk about my short game and putting…”
  • pat_kato: “Was playing Nike Vapor Pro Combos then went with the Mizuno MP-20 MMC, and I love them.”
  • BPetry: “Just got a set of Cobra Forged Tec players distance irons and so far I really like them. I came from hitting Callaway Razr X MB’s or a set of MP-54’s that I still hit well when I swing well but needed the extra distance with a bit slower swing speeds as I get older.”

Entire Thread: “10-18 handicap: What irons?”

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Equipment

What GolfWRXers are saying about Ping Eye 2 Berylliums

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In our forums, our members have been talking about Ping’s classic Eye 2 Berylliums after WRXer ‘mywong23’ kicked off a discussion on the irons. ‘Mywong23’, who refuses to replace them with newer technology, reaches out to fellow members who give their thoughts on the vintage clubs.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Old Tom Morris: “I never liked the way they looked. The shape was funny, and the lack of ferrules turned me off. However, they were and still are an excellent iron that are as good as many models out now. Nothing wrong with gaming that set, not hurting you at all.”
  • need2golf: “The rich kids had the Eye 2’s back in the late ’80s, nothing wrong w/ that. I had Wilson 1200 GE’s. Years ago, I bought my very own Eye 2’s, loved them, but sold them. Just bought BeCu Eye 2’s a little while back, can’t play golf yet but dying to game them. I shot some great scores w/ the Eye 2’s several years ago, can’t go wrong.”
  • scruffynick: “No but they’re my dream irons. Used the stainless for best on two decades… They were the greatest irons ever made for me. But I’d love a set of BeCu…. Had a look while on lockdown as there’s a 6-PW in red dot and I’m so tempted but… Mrs not having it considering I’ve got brand new Mizunos in my locker.”
  • 14max: “I’ve always been partial to the steel EYE2s, but the nickel and copper ISIs have made their way into my bag on more than one occasion. The copper EYE2s are pretty special and just seeing them sitting in a bag makes me wax nostalgic…”
  • BobV56: “I played mine until 2018. Sometimes I still miss hitting them.”

Entire Thread: “Ping Eye 2 Berylliums”

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