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When it comes to club repairs, one of the most common problem club builders deal with is steel shafts that have broken at the top of the hosel. When this happens, there is no way to clamp the shaft using conventional methods. Heat is often used to remove the broken shaft, but often times too much heat is used. The result is a damaged badge in the club head.

In one continuous shot, I show the process and tools used to remove a broken steel shaft from a hosel.

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Ryan Barath is a club fitter and master club builder who has more than 15 years experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour professionals. He studied business and marketing at the Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf located in Toronto. He now works independently from his home shop in Hamilton and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers, including True Temper. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, from course architecture to physics, and share his passion for club building, and wedge grinding.

4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. peter collins

    Feb 13, 2018 at 6:18 am

    I was begging him to put the heat back on the hosel,he got there in the end.
    If Ryan Barath is a club fitter and master club builder who has more than 15 years experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour professionals, then i have nothing to fear.

  2. DaveT

    Feb 7, 2018 at 9:24 pm

    Great video and great instruction. But you could have done it a little easier. Instead of the square EZ-out, use a screw extractor. I’ve always removed broken-off steel shaft tips that way, and never needed to supplement the tool with pliers nor a drill bit.

  3. Keith

    Feb 7, 2018 at 5:51 pm

    This is what happens when you don’t have a grey haired mentor. This can only be described as stumbling through it. No vise pads. They’re cheap. Not seating the ez out (drill out the weight bro. It’s lead) Needle nose players yanking and slipping. Just asking for a scratch. When you have the shaft out the slightest amount, you can slide the smooth end of a just slightly smaller bit inside. Clamp the teeny bit of shaft (supported be the bit from being crushed) in your vise and twist the head off by hand. Old timers just goose the shaft out gently by spinning it out on a drill bit. ( gently). I couldn’t watch the whole video. Cringing. Let me know if I missed anything.

  4. John

    Feb 7, 2018 at 1:08 pm

    If you had used a EZ-Out you wouldn’t have had to pry on it. It would have come right out.

    Check them out at your local auto parts store. I’ve also used them on sawed off shaft extensions and broken bolts. They come in different diameters.

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Courses

Hidden Gem of the Day: FarmLinks at Pursell Farms in Sylacauga, Alabama

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These aren’t the traditional “top-100” golf courses in America, or the ultra-private golf clubs you can’t get onto. These are the hidden gems; they’re accessible to the public, they cost less than $50, but they’re unique, beautiful and fun to play in their own right. We recently asked our GolfWRX Members to help us find these “hidden gems.” We’re treating this as a bucket list of golf courses to play across the country, and the world. If you have a personal favorite hidden gem, submit it here!

Today’s Hidden Gem of the Day was submitted by GolfWRX member TK3, who takes us to FarmLinks at Pursell Farms in  Sylacauga, Alabama. In TK3’s description of the course, he focuses on the enjoyment of a day out at FarmLinks.

“It is not part of the RTJ Trail, but only about 45 minutes from the Judge, Senator + Legislator Courses.  Fantastic track, one fee all you can play and eat and the staff are great. 

FarmLinks started off as a way to promote the Company’s fertilizer business, so you can only imagine the course conditioning.  Played there about a half dozen times and it never fails to impress me over and over again.  Definitely worth the trip.”

According to FarmLinks at Pursell Farms’ website, 18 holes during the week or weekend will set you back $59.

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Check out the full forum thread here, and submit your Hidden Gem.

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Mondays Off: Tipping Dos and Don’ts, Does Jordan Spieth really have the yips?

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Steve and Knudson talk about a PGA Tour pro allegedly tipping his caddie only $3,000 after winning a tournament. Steve gives Knudson a lesson on who he should tip and when during a visit to a private club. Finally, Steve then tells us why Jordan Spieth doesn’t have the yips and what you can do to help with the yips if you have them!

Check out the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes or here to listen on Spotify.

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Hidden Gem of the Day: George Dunne National in Oak Forest, Illinois

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These aren’t the traditional “top-100” golf courses in America, or the ultra-private golf clubs you can’t get onto. These are the hidden gems; they’re accessible to the public, they cost less than $50, but they’re unique, beautiful and fun to play in their own right. We recently asked our GolfWRX Members to help us find these “hidden gems.” We’re treating this as a bucket list of golf courses to play across the country, and the world. If you have a personal favorite hidden gem, submit it here!

Today’s Hidden Gem of the Day was submitted by GolfWRX member DeeBee30, who takes us to George Dunne National in Oak Forest, Illinois. The course is a part of the Illinois Forest Preserve golf system, and in DeeBee30’s description of the course, the challenge provided is underlined as just one of the highlights of the course.

“Really fun tree-lined parkland layout with some interesting holes that cover rolling terrain that you don’t find in many Chicago-area golf courses.  Coming in at 7262 yards and 75.4/142 from the tips, Dunne offers four sets of tees that will provide a good test for most golfers.  The course gets a lot of play, but it’s always in great condition.”

According to George Dunne National’s website, 18 holes during the week will cost in the region of $40, while the rate rises to $75 should you want to play on the weekend.

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Check out the full forum thread here, and submit your Hidden Gem.

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