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More Distance Off the Tee (Part 1 of 3): Upper Body Training

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If you read my previous story, Tour Pro’s Revealed: 3 Tests to See How You Stack Up, you are well aware of the fact that improving your upper body power is one of three sure ways to increase your distance off the tee. If you have not, I strongly suggest you check it out to gain some context about what is to follow and what is critical for your golf game.

Through our testing and the testing done of many of the industry leaders in golf performance, we have found that the ability of golfers to generate “push power” from their upper body is critical to maximize efficiency and speed in the swing. The way that you can test your power is simple. Sit in a chair with your feet flat on the ground. Keeping your back on the chair, chest pass with both hands a 6-pound medicine ball as far as you can. When you compare this to your vertical jump as described in More Distance Off the Tee (Part 2 of 3): Lower Body Training Plan,¬†the number in feet you threw the ball should be relatively close to your jump in inches.

If you threw the ball and it went 5 feet, you have an upper body power problem. If you threw the ball 25 feet and jumped only 14 inches, your upper body is not the problem — you probably need to focus on your lower body. It’s not rocket science once you understand what you are looking for. What can be challenging is knowing how to improve your power once you identify a problem. That is where the rest of this article comes in. What I am going to outline below are three of the most common upper body power exercises that we use with our amateur, senior and professional golfers.

The key with any power training exercise is to make sure you are as rested as possible between sets so that you can be as explosive as possible for the repetitions. Try not to do more than 6 repetitions in a set to assure that each one is as fast and explosive as possible.

Med Ball Chest Pass on Wall

This is one of the most basic exercises there is for developing upper body push power. Make sure your feet are about shoulder-width apart and don’t be afraid to use your legs to help maximize the punishment you deliver to against the wall!

Med Ball Wall Ball

Watching the video, you may be scratching you head and wondering why this is in the upper body power article when clearly the athlete is using his legs. The reason is that in the golf swing, power starts with the legs.

Med Ball Sky Chest Throws

This one is simple. Laying on your back, all you need to do is push the ball up as high as you can, catch it on the way down and the explode it back up into the air as high as you can. If you incorporate this exercise into your routine even once a week, you will see huge gains in your ability to swing faster if this was a problem area for you.

That being said, power creation requires not only speed but also strength development. It is also important that you have a solid strength program to increase your ability to generate more force. While this is beyond the scope of this article, finding yourself a solid golf fitness expert will help you create your ideal program.

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Chris Finn is the founder of Par4Success and a Licensed Physical Therapist, Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, Titleist Performance Institute Certified Medical Professional and trained to perform Trigger Point Dry Needling in North Carolina. He is regarded as the premier Golf Fitness, Performance & Medical Expert in North Carolina. Since starting Par4Success in 2011, Chris has and continues to work with Touring Professionals, elite level juniors & amateurs as well as weekend warriors. He has contributed to numerous media outlets, is a published author, a consultant and presents all over the world on topics related to golf performance and the golf fitness business.

15 Comments

15 Comments

  1. Randy Bernard

    Feb 17, 2018 at 8:09 pm

    A next-level version of the third exercise would be to do it with your shoulders and head on a stability ball, rather than from the floor.

  2. Jim Marlow

    Jan 24, 2018 at 10:41 am

    I am 76 years old and spend an hour in the gym 5-6 times a week. I might as well incorporate some exercises that have the potential to increase distance off the tee. My gym has weighted balls but they are much smaller than what you show. How important is the size of the ball and where can you get the type of ball that you demonstrated?

    • Chris Finn

      Jan 31, 2018 at 11:05 am

      The size of the ball is not important Jim, rather the weight. Somewhere between 8-12 lbs typically works to allow you to get the nervous system firing faster.

  3. Ray Bennett

    Jan 23, 2018 at 4:35 am

    Haha..is this article a joke?? If not, then the author knows nothing about the golf swing. Must be desperate for articles to publish, if this is typical.

    • Chris Finn

      Jan 31, 2018 at 11:08 am

      Thanks for the comment Ray. This is based off the latest sports science and statistics relative to the three physiological movements that generate power in the golf swing (vertical thrust, rotation and push power). This article is about training the latter of the three.

      There are technical changes, equipment improvements and many other ways to improve swing speed that are “golfy”, but this is what science is showing to most efficient physically. I would be happy to discuss further with you if you would like to learn. My you can reply back here or email me directly at chris@par4success.com and we can set up a call.

  4. The dude

    Jan 21, 2018 at 5:14 pm

    How heavy the Med ball?

    • George

      Jan 22, 2018 at 4:39 am

      Six pound heavy.

    • Chris Finn

      Jan 22, 2018 at 8:16 am

      10-20 lbs generally but depends on the athlete and how much weight they can move with speed and proper technique.

      • Kurt

        Jan 22, 2018 at 1:23 pm

        Okay, but now tell us this ballistic medicine ball exercise is NOT recommended for the untrained recreational golfer. You final sentences hints at this but you should be more specific.

        • Chris Finn

          Jan 31, 2018 at 11:11 am

          Thanks for the comment Kurt. There are times and places for lateralizations, regressions and progressions for power training. These three exercises shown are relatively low risk compared to higher level power training. If a golfer is unable to walk, I would agree there might be some lower hanging fruit that you want to address first.

  5. Kurt

    Jan 21, 2018 at 12:39 pm

    ” It is also important that you have a solid strength program to increase your ability to generate more force.” This means general conditioning before you attempt golf-specific training. Anybody?
    Here’s the problem: “…the golf swing, power starts with the legs.” If you can’t walk the golf course your legs are too weak or you’re too lazy. Plain and simple.

    • ben

      Jan 21, 2018 at 1:24 pm

      … or yer too decrepit and hopeless. ūüėõ

      • BG

        Jan 21, 2018 at 3:55 pm

        ..or just buy a set of PXGs and problemo solved. It’s all in the clubs.

    • Jp

      Jan 21, 2018 at 6:41 pm

      You forget about those of us who have disabilities that prevent under doctors order that can not walk a golf course, but can enjoy good golf and this type of training.

      • Will

        Jan 21, 2018 at 9:02 pm

        Simple …. give up golf if you can’t walk.

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The Gear Dive

The Gear Dive: TrackMan’s Lance Vinson Part 2

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In this episode of the Gear Dive, Johnny goes even deeper into the TrackMan data with Tour Rep Lance Vinson. It’s a ridiculous nerd out covering what the future holds, who is the most efficient player on tour, who hits it the best and a million other things.

Check out the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes or here to listen on Spotify.

Want more GolfWRX Radio? Check out our other shows (and the full archives for this show) below. 

 

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Mondays Off

Mondays Off: How is the new PGA schedule looking? Gross golf bag cleaning story!

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The new PGA schedule is out and how will so much major golf look in the fall. What golf gear would you buy with your stimulus check if you could blow it all on golf? Knudson has a gross story about cleaning out a golf bag.

Check out the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes or here to listen on Spotify.

Want more GolfWRX Radio? Check out our other shows (and the full archives for this show) below. 

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19th Hole

Tiger at the Masters: The 3 that got away

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This time last year, Tiger Woods earned his fifth green jacket at the 2019 Masters, breaking a 14-year drought at Augusta National and completing a storybook career comeback (see Tiger Woods’ 2019 Masters WITB here).

Between his 2005 and 2019 victories, Woods gave himself several chances to reclaim the green jacket, but for one reason or another, the championship continuously eluded the 15-time major winner.

Looking back on that drought, three years in particular stick out in my mind where Woods (being the ruthless closer that he is) could, and maybe should, have capitalized on massive opportunities.

2007 Masters

A unique tournament broke out at the 2007 Masters with chilly and windy conditions meaning we would see an over-par score winning the event for the first time in a generation.

Unusually however was the fact that Tiger Woods had got himself into a fantastic position heading into the final day’s play‚ÄĒone stroke back of the lead and in the final group.

By the first hole on Sunday, Woods had a share of the lead. A couple of holes later, and he was the sole leader. But instead of the game’s greatest ever closer doing what he does best, we saw the first small chink in Tiger’s major armor.

Unable to keep up with the improved scoring on Sunday, Woods finished the championship two strokes behind Zach Johnson. It was the first time Woods lost a major in which he held the lead at some point in the final round.

11th hole Sunday. Woods saved par.

Summing up after the round why things hadn’t turned out the way the entire golf world expected, Woods said

“Looking back over the week I basically blew this tournament with two rounds where I had bogey, bogey finishes. That’s 4-over in two holes. The last two holes, you just can’t afford to do that and win major championships.”

2011 Masters

In one of the most exciting final rounds in Masters history, an electric front-nine charge from Woods coupled with a Rory McIlroy collapse saw the then 35-year-old tied for the lead heading into the back nine.

After back-to-back pars on the challenging 10th and 11th holes, Woods found the green on the 12th before it all slipped away. A disastrous three-putt was followed by a deflating five on the par-5 13th and an agonizing near-miss for birdie on 14.

In typical defiant fashion, Woods then flushed a long iron on the par-5 15th to give him five feet for eagle and what would have been the outright lead. But he couldn’t find the cup.

Directly following his round, a visibly miffed Woods said

“I should have shot an easy 3- or 4-under on the back nine and I only posted even. But I’m right there in the thick of it and a bunch of guys have a chance. We’ll see what happens.”

What happened was eventual champion Charl Schwartzel did what Woods said he should have done‚ÄĒshooting 4 under on the back to win his first major.

2013 Masters

Luck, or lack of, is a contentious topic when it comes to sports fans, but at the 2013 Masters, Woods’ shocking fate played out as if those on Mount Olympus were orchestrating the tournament.

Woods entered the 2013 Masters as the World Number One, brimming with confidence having won three out of his first five tournaments to start the year.

By Friday afternoon, Woods had cruised into a share of the lead, before crisply striking a wedge on the par-5 15th as he hunted for another birdie.

In a cruel twist of fate, Woods’ ball struck the pin and ricocheted back into the water. “Royally cheated!” shouted on-course announcer David Feherty. Nobody could argue otherwise.

A subsequent “bad drop” turned a probable birdie into a triple-bogey placing Woods behind the proverbial 8-ball for the rest of the tournament. The game’s ultimate closer should have been in the lead with two rounds to play on a front-runner’s paradise of a course; instead, he was in chase-mode. (From 1991-2012, 19 of the 22 winners came from the final group).

Woods tried to rally over the weekend, but if he didn’t think the 2013 Masters was ill-fated for himself by Friday evening, then he would have been excused to do so on the eighth hole on Saturday.

 

Had Woods’ golf ball missed the pin at 15 on that hot and humid Spring afternoon in 2013, then he not only wins, but he likely wins going away.

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