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Why Every Golf Swing Tip Should Come With a Warning

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The internet has given birth to a plethora of golf swing advice, tips and how-to information. For average golfers, I think it has become a source of confusion rather than clarity… and with good reason. The information itself is all well and good, but the interpretation of the advice is a cause for concern. I know this because I teach golf every day to weekenders and people who play golf for enjoyment. Often, I hear them relate how they are attempting to incorporate a tip into their swing. And sometimes, in fact quite often, what they are trying to do is flat out wrong for them. The operative phrase here is for them.

Imagine for a minute that Jordan Spieth had read or heard about the importance of a straight left arm, or a full pronation and supination of his arms coming into impact. Those two pieces of advice have been widely discussed throughout the instruction community for years. And for some, perhaps many, they are relevant. Not so much for Jordan. His instructor was wise enough to know better in this case. That same teacher may very well have another student do those things; he just knew it was not in Jordan’s best interest.

How does a golfer know something they have read or heard is good for their swing when it’s likely the author or video creator has never seen them swing. Personally, I try to steer away from offering generalized swing tips. Rather, I focus on an approach that can best be described as, “If this, then that.” IF your golf ball is doing this, THEN you might try this.

I start every one of my lessons with a direct question: “What’s your miss and what poor shot do you, at times or often, hit?” That’s a loaded question for an instructor, because the answer contains a ton of information about a golfer’s pattern. For example, high upright swings create high slices; lower, flatter motions create low hooks; wide swings hit the heel; narrow ones hit the toe; steep swings hit fat shots; flatter ones miss thin. On and on.

I have had a lot of golfers come to my lesson tee trying their best to incorporate a move they’ve read or heard, and what they are attempting to do does not fit their puzzle. A recent example comes to mind about a player who was struggling with swaying off the ball and very wide takeaway. Consequently, he was hitting 2 inches behind most shots off the turf… even drop-kicking his driver. He told me how a Golf Channel segment had suggested that a wider arc creates more power. True enough, perhaps; it just happened to be terrible advice for him because he was already wide.

The very best swing advice you can get comes from your own instructor, but if you are going to attempt to employ a new pattern on your own, please be sure it can help correct your old one. In other words, be certain the prescription fits the condition.

Every swing tip should come with a warning: “Side effects can be hazardous to golf swing. Trying this can cause slices, hooks, shanks, pulls, pushes, thin and fat shots, skulls and pop ups. If any of these symptoms appear, please see your instructor right away!”

In deciding what information to incorporate, as I’ve said, a personal instructor is best, but if you are interested in trying a new tip from a friend, book, article or video, perhaps an online video review of your swing might reveal what is helpful and what could be harmful. In other words, buyer beware. I would hate to see any of you make your current swing problem worse. My new website will include a limited number of online students so I can work more directly with golfers through Skype and other platforms, but I have to know your history, your ball flight trends, and any physical limitations before offering assistance.

I know a lot us who write articles are accused of wanting more business. Personally, I do not want more business; I have all I can handle. If I were to get a rash of new students, I would need more time and/or a bigger staff-neither of which I care to do. I’m simply saying “swing-unseen” advice can be dangerous. Please know what you’re getting into.

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Dennis Clark is a PGA Master Professional. Clark has taught the game of golf for more than 30 years to golfers all across the country, and is recognized as one of the leading teachers in the country by all the major golf publications. He is also is a seven-time PGA award winner who has earned the following distinctions: -- Teacher of the Year, Philadelphia Section PGA -- Teacher of the Year, Golfers Journal -- Top Teacher in Pennsylvania, Golf Magazine -- Top Teacher in Mid Atlantic Region, Golf Digest -- Earned PGA Advanced Specialty certification in Teaching/Coaching Golf -- Achieved Master Professional Status (held by less than 2 percent of PGA members) -- PGA Merchandiser of the Year, Tri State Section PGA -- Golf Professional of the Year, Tri State Section PGA -- Presidents Plaque Award for Promotion and Growth of the Game of Golf -- Junior Golf Leader, Tri State section PGA -- Served on Tri State PGA Board of Directors. Clark is also former Director of Golf and Instruction at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort. He now directs his own school, The Dennis Clark Golf Academy at the JW Marriott Marco Island in Naples, Fla.. He can be reached at dennisclarkgolf@gmail.com

14 Comments

14 Comments

  1. Tom54

    Jul 26, 2017 at 7:43 pm

    Please can we retire that picture of the body bug skin disorder looking thing once and for all??

  2. Tom54

    Jul 26, 2017 at 7:40 pm

    I am one that falls into trying all sorts of methods and tips. That’s what keeps us coming back for more isn’t it? As long as we see the pros struggle with their games and that’s their livelihood, than we can struggle with ours too. Arnie said it best when he said “swing your own swing”. Every day we go out there is a chance to play well. Nothing beats a good round

    it best when he said”swing your own swing”. The reason golf is so alluring is that every day out there is a chance to have

  3. Eric B.

    Jul 25, 2017 at 7:11 pm

    A lot of truth here. I am a beginner and initially started out with YouTube. I must say, I learned several good things initially such as grip and backswing form. I was hooked right away and signed up for a 3 lesson package from a local pro. In my first lesson, he really helped me and my friends couldn’t believe my improvement. I swore I wouldn’t watch any more videos and focus on what he was teaching. But, due to scheduling issues, it was a month before I could go back for my second lesson. The siren’s call of the internet was too much and I started watching them again. Soon I regressed and was all over the place. Too many conflicting opinions and my lack of experience prevented me from filtering out the noise. After my second my lesson, he righted the ship again and I started swinging much better once again. Thing is, I do enjoy the videos. They’re fun and interesting. But now I avoid anything related to the swing or grip or alignment, etc. I’m leaving that to my instructor. Instead, I watch the ones about golf course management, dealing with bunkers, green readingor anything related to strategy. I get my fix but also don’t pollute my head with conflicting info.

  4. Joe D

    Jul 25, 2017 at 6:20 pm

    I’m a new golfer, still exploring my swing. I’ve been obsessed with videos. Meandmygolf. Crossfield. Shiels. Clement. Alistair Davies. Paul Wilson. I had a decent driver swing, bad wood swing, decent iron swing.

    After obsessing over all of the videos, I’d try each tip at the range and the results were far from good. I eventually developed a better iron swing, and a better wood swing. But my driver went to shat. That was my best club and I couldn’t hit it at all. Saw this article, last night, off to the range today. Forget all of the damn advice. Just swing the damn thing. So far everything came back.

    • acemandrake

      Jul 25, 2017 at 7:03 pm

      Yes. The tough part is keeping this approach: Swing thoughts are seductive.

  5. Philip

    Jul 25, 2017 at 10:13 am

    Totally agree – baby steps, tiny tweaks, taking it slow and allowing time (weeks or months) before deciding to stop something or to give it more time is the only way. Of course in saying that I am expecting that things haven’t gone sideways with a tweak – in that case one has to slam on the brakes and step back as obviously something was misunderstood or misapplied. Having someone you trust looking at your swing is great. The only caveat with an external point of view (whether instructor or video) is that one still has to internalize the swing and any tweaks – thinking that if one physical part of your swing is off and all one has to do is make the direct change is a recipe for a fools errand – and the endless going in circles. What may be required to change the location of an arm in the swing may have nothing to do with the arms. Hence the reason for drills – to encourage change in a better direction without trying to force it immediately via thoughts.

  6. CB

    Jul 25, 2017 at 9:28 am

    Excellent piece. This is why I enjoy visiting the instructor that I see. He takes what i bring to the table and incorporates ideas/mechanics/thoughts to make what I have better. His whole goal was to get me to the best impact position that my middle age amateur ability could. With his guidance, I went from a bogey golfer to shooting in the 70s with ease (with a personal best of 74). I see him once or twice a year for checkups.

    • acemandrake

      Jul 25, 2017 at 12:26 pm

      Your experience confirms what I believe works best for learning this game. I’m a combination of formal instruction and self-learning while still young and able to practice a lot.

      If asked, I tell anyone to find an instructor they like, work with them, and ignore all other golf swing info from other sources (web, Golf Channel, golf magazines).

      “Happy with ball flight & a swing that repeats” may be all that most golfers need.

      BTW, nice playing, CB!

  7. AceW7Iron

    Jul 25, 2017 at 7:50 am

    It surely comes down to each individual and finding a swing that fits their body and abilities. The internet can certainly hurt some seekers but it can also help some tremendously. I recently started slumping (9 hc) after weeks of really good ball striking. I didnt feel like I changed a thing but all of the sudden I could only pull hook a ball…period. After about 4 rounds I was so frustrated it seemed taking 3 weeks off and quitting was the best thing I could do. Then I started searching for videos on how to hit a fade…No, I didn’t really find the magic bullet there in plain sight but hidden among all the hours of youtube video I found a gem called the “Coat Hanger Drill”. I figured what did I have to lose by going to the closet and swinging a few times in the living room with a coat hanger. Turns out the sensation was immediately different than the way I was swinging and I knew I had to stay more connected with the club handle & my wrist. My 1st drive after that was really a slice…my eyes lit up…I can tame a slice. My next drive split the fairway and my approach shot covered the pin. I was back and all because I had a great tool at my fingertips that I didnt have to leave my home to use.

    • dennis clark

      Jul 25, 2017 at 9:09 am

      No doubt it can be a huge help, I like to think some of the things I’ve written have helped folks but the secret is knowing which tip to employ. Thx

      • dapadre

        Jul 26, 2017 at 7:39 am

        Yes you have most certainly sir. Your look on golf is so insightful and I always look forward to your write ups. I actually print some out for later references. My favorite was where you spoke about how your grip has to match your swing dynamics, GOLDEN!

    • dapadre

      Jul 25, 2017 at 9:16 am

      Totally agree. Hence Im just love that Speith is doing so well, why? If we never heard of him and saw his swing, I can guarantee you that there would be comments on how bad it was ( ie his chicken wing and that crazy grip where the v’s dont even align) but it works for him. As its been said its all about the impact. Look at greats like Nicklaus on the backswing his club is actually vertical. I read a book recently that changed my whole look on golf, The L.A.W.S. of the Golfswing by Mike Adams. In short he states and I agree totally, that since we are all different builds and flexibility etc, its impossible to try and teach ONE way to swing. Since reading the book ive dropped strokes and my impact is more solid then ever. Im a club longer and my carry distances on my drives have gone up 20 yards. Since I have stopped fighting my natural swing and have adopted that which suits my body, ive only seen progress.

      • dennis clark

        Jul 25, 2017 at 9:27 am

        Yes if we put a wig on Jordan and some baggy jeans, everyone would be finding fault. IMPACT!

        • Double Mocha Man

          Jul 25, 2017 at 10:05 am

          … and take away his shiny Titleist clubs… and remove his caddy. Those are givaways. 🙂

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Instruction

The Big Shift: How to master pressure and the golf transition using prior sports training

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If you’re an #AverageJoeGolfer, work a day job, and don’t spend countless hours practicing, you might be interested in knowing that sports you played growing up, and even beer league softball skills, can be used to help you play better golf. We’re sure you’ve heard hockey players tend to hit the ball a mile, make the “best golfers”, while pitchers and quarterbacks have solid games, but baseball/softball hitters struggle with consistency. Did you know that a killer tennis backhand might help your golf game if you play from the opposite side? Dancers are way ahead of other athletes making a switch to golf because they understand that centeredness creates power and consistency much more efficiently than shifting all around, unnecessary swaying, or “happy feet.”

Lurking beneath fat shots, worm burners, and occasional shanks, are skillsets and motions you can pull from the old memory bank to apply on the golf course. Yes, you heard us right; your high school letterman jacket can finally be put to good use and help you improve your move. You just need to understand some simple adjustments different sports athletes need to make to be successful golfers.

In golf, shifting from your trailside into your lead side is what we’ll call the TRANSITION. Old School teachers refer to this motion, or shift, as “Foot Work”, New-Fangled-Techno-Jargon-Packed-Instruction uses “Ground Pressure/Force” to refer to the same concept. Don’t worry about the nomenclature; just know, as many GolfWRXers already do, that you must get your weight to your lead side if you want any chance at making solid and consistent contact. TRANSITION might be THE toughest motion in golf to master.

The good news for you is that TRANSITION happens in all other sports but in slightly different ways, depending on the sport. Golfers can more quickly learn TRANSITION, and speed up their swing learning process by understanding how prior sport experience can be applied to the golf swing.

[The basics of a solid golf move are; 1) you should have a SETUP that is centered and balanced, 2) you move your weight/pressure into your trail side during the TAKEAWAY and BACKSWING, 3) TRANSITION moves your weight/pressure back into your lead side, and 4) you FINISH with the club smashing the ball down the fairway. Okay, it’s not quite as easy as I make it sound, but hopefully our discussion today can relieve some stress when it comes time for you to start training your game.]

Baseball/Softball Hitters

Hitting coaches don’t like their hitters playing golf during the season, that’s a fact. The TRANSITIONS are too different, and if they play too much golf, they can lose the ability to hit off-speed pitches because their swing can become too upright. Golf requires an orbital hand path (around an angled plane) with an upright-stacked finish, while hitting requires batters to have a straight-line (more horizontal) hand path and to “stay back or on top of” the ball.

Now we apologize for the lack of intricate knowledge and terminology around hitting a baseball, we only played up through high school. What we know for sure is that guys/gals who have played a lot of ball growing up, and who aren’t pitchers struggle with golf’s TRANSITION. Hitters tend to hang back and do a poor job of transferring weight properly. When they get the timing right, they can make contact, but consistency is a struggle with fat shots and scooping being the biggest issues that come to mind.

So how can you use your star baseball/softball hitting skills with some adjustments for golf? Load, Stride, Swing is what all-good hitters do, in that order. Hitters’ issues revolve around the Stride, when it comes to golf. They just don’t get into their lead sides fast enough. As a golfer, hitters can still take the same approach, with one big adjustment; move more pressure to your lead side during your stride, AND move it sooner. We’ve had plenty of ‘a ha’ moments when we put Hitters on balance boards or have them repeat step drills hundreds of times; “oh, that’s what I need to do”…BINGO…Pound Town, Baby!

Softball/Baseball Pitchers, Quarterbacks, & Kickers

There’s a reason that kickers, pitchers, and quarterbacks are constantly ranked as the top athlete golfers and it’s not because they have a ton of downtime between starts and play a lot of golf. Their ‘day jobs’ throwing/kicking motions have a much greater impact on how they approach sending a golf ball down the fairway. It’s apparent that each of these sports TRAINS and INGRAINS golf’s TRANSITION motion very well. They tend to load properly into their trailside while staying centered (TAKEAWAY/BACKSWING), and they transfer pressure into their lead side, thus creating effortless speed and power. Now there are nuances for how to make adjustments for golf, but the feeling of a pitching or kicking motion is a great training move for golf.

If this was your sport growing up, how can you improve your consistency? Work on staying centered and minimizing “happy feet” because golf is not a sport where you want to move too much or get past your lead side.


Dance

My wife was captain of her high school dance team, has practiced ballet since she was in junior high, and is our resident expert on Ground Pressure forces relating to dance. She has such a firm grasp on these forces that she is able to transfer her prior sports skill to play golf once or twice a year and still hit the ball past me and shoot in the low 100s; what can I say, she has a good coach. More importantly, she understands that staying centered and a proper TRANSITION, just like in Dance, are requirements that create stability, speed, and consistent motions for golf. Christo Garcia is a great example of a Ballerina turned scratch golfer who uses the movement of a plié (below left) to power his Hogan-esque golf move. There is no possible way Misty Copeland would be able to powerfully propel herself into the air without a proper TRANSITION (right).

Being centered is critical to consistently hitting the golf ball. So, in the same way that dancers stay centered and shift their weight/pressure to propel themselves through the air, they can stay on the ground and instead create a golf swing. Dancers tend to struggle with the timing of the hands and arms in the golf swing. We train them a little differently by training their timing just like a dance routine; 1 and 2 and 3 and…. Dancers learn small motions independently and stack each micro-movement on top of one another, with proper timing, to create a dance move (golf swing) more like musicians learn, but that article is for another time.

Hockey

Hockey is a great example of the golf TRANSITION because it mimics golf’s motions almost perfectly. Even a subtlety like the direction in which the feet apply pressure is the same in Hockey as in Golf, but that’s getting in the weeds a bit. Hockey players load up on their trailside, and then perform the TRANSITION well; they shift into their lead sides and then rotate into the puck with the puck getting in the way of the stick…this is the golf swing, just on skates and ice…my ankles hurt just writing that.

If you played hockey growing up, you have the skillsets for a proper golf TRANSITION, and you’ll improve much faster if you spend your time training a full FINISH which involves staying centered and balanced.

Now we didn’t get into nuances of each and every sport, but we tried to cover most popular athletic motions we thought you might have experience in in the following table. The key for your Big Shift, is using what you’ve already learned in other sports and understanding how you might need to change existing and known motions to adapt them to golf. If you played another sport, and are struggling, it doesn’t mean you need to give up golf because your motion is flawed…you just need to know how to train aspects of your golf move a little differently than someone who comes from a different sport might.

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Clement: Effortless power for senior golfers

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Are you struggling with range of motion? Want more EFFORTLESS POWER? We are truly the experts at this having taught these methods for 25 plus years, while others were teaching resistance, breaking everyone’s backs and screwing up their minds with endless positions to hit and defects to fix. Welcome home to Wisdom in Golf!

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Clement: How to turbo charge your swing

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The shift in golf instruction continues and Wisdom in Golf and GolfWRX are right out there blazing a trail of fantastic content and techniques to get you to feel the most blissful, rhythmic golf shots you can strike! This here is the humdinger that keeps on giving and is now used by a plethora of tour players who are benefitting greatly and moving up the world rankings because of it.

The new trend (ours is about 25 years young) is the antithesis of the “be careful, don’t move too much, don’t make a mistake” approach we have endured for the last 30 years plus. Time to break free of the shackles that hold you back and experience the greatness that is already right there inside that gorgeous human machine you have that is so far from being defective! Enjoy!

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