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Ping introduces new face material with its G400 Fairways, Hybrids and Crossover

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With its new G400 Fairway Woods, Hybrids and Crosscover, Ping has introduced an all-new face material that helps golfers ensure all the distance gaps are filled between their driver and longest iron. The new club faces are made from maraging steel, which is stronger and more flexible than the 455 carpenter steel that was used in the G line. The material change is said to make the clubs higher-launching, longer-flying and more forgiving across the board.

Ping is also offering more options than ever to help golfers get the right fit. The company is adding a 9-wood to the lineup, as well as 22-degree SFT fairway wood. In addition, Ping’s popular Stretch 3 and Crossover have undergone changes to enhance their strengths. The company has also found a way to reduce the common miss to the left with its lower-lofted hybrids. See how the changes have improved each of Ping’s new offerings below.

G400 Fairway Woods

With the new maraging steel face inserts in the G400 fairway woods, Ping is boasting some serious improvements over the G line. Let’s talk some numbers.

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Since the new face material is lighter, Ping was able to save 6 grams from the face — that weight was distributed into the copper-colored, high-density weight on the back of the sole. According to Ping, the face is 28 percent thinner, 18 percent lighter and produces 30 percent more flex at impact. As such, Ping says these fairway woods have a 5 percent higher MOI (moment of inertia, a measure of forgiveness) and 2 mph more ball speed to create a higher maximum height. This all equals 7 yards more carry than the G fairway woods, according to Ping’s testing.

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When purchasing fairway woods, however, golfers must think about the intended purpose of the club they’re buying. Do they want an alternative option off the tee, or a club to use from the turf to hold greens.

Ping’s G400 Stretch 3 fairway wood is like “a driver off the tee,” the company says. Compared to the pervious model, the club has been given an even deeper face and larger club head to produce the ultimate distance. Engineers have increased MOI by moving center of gravity (CG) deeper in the club head, which will also make it more forgiving.

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Ping has also introduced a new 9 wood (25 degrees), as well as a new 7 wood (22 degrees) with Straight Flight Technology (SFT) to help golfers hit the ball higher, and through SFT, reduce the likelihood of a slice.

A look at Ping's new SFT fairway wood from address

A look at Ping’s new SFT fairway wood from address

Ping’s G400 fairway woods will sell for $287.50 per club.

G400 Hybrids

The major concern with hybrids for a majority of better golfers is they can produce a hook. To offset this issue, Ping has made the lower-lofted hybrids in the G400 line more fade-biased by moving CG toward the toe. This will reduce the leftward miss, if not eliminate it, for many golfers who struggle with this problem. The higher-lofted hybrids, however, do not have this toe-ward CG, and therefore will remain easy to turn over. Ping reasoned that higher-lofted hybrids are most likely to be in the bags of higher-handicap golfers, who are likely to need help fixing a slice.

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Like the G400 fairway woods, the G400 hybrids also have maraging steel face inserts. Specifically in the hybrids, Ping says the new material makes the face 11 percent thinner, 10 percent lighter and produces 35 percent more flex at impact. This leads to 2 mph more ball speed, a steeper trajectorym and therefore more stopping power, ultimately leading to 5 yards more carry in comparison to the G hybrids with the same lofts.

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Compared to the G, the G400 hybrids also have a longer hosel that allows them to be lie-angle adjusted +/- 2 degrees, which improves fitting options. The G400’s new shafts are 0.370 inches in diameter instead of 0.355 inches in diameter.

Hybrid options include 2 (17 degrees), 3 (19 degrees), 4 (22 degrees), 5 (26 degrees) and 6 (30 degrees). They will sell for $247.50 per club.

G400 Crossover: “This is definitely not a driving iron”

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While some golfers may have seen the original G Crossover as a driving iron, Ping is fighting that label with the new design of the G400 Crossover. Through structural changes and its more flexible maraging steel face inserts, the G400 Crossover is higher-launching and higher-spinning than the original to better hold greens from the turf. According to Ping’s testing, golfers will see 20 percent higher launch and 500 rpm more spin.

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The tungsten weight that was in the toe-side of the sole in the G Crossover has also been moved farther toward toe, and it actually wraps around the contour of the toe. The placement of the high-density weight will help to center CG and ultimately produce a straighter flight than its G predecessor. The sole also has a bit more camber so that the club glides through the turf without digging; Ping says it’s comparable to the sole of a hybrid, rather than an iron. For an even more iron-like look, Ping has “slimmed down” the profile by an eighth-of-an-inch, and it has thinned out the top rail as well.

You may also notice a different finish compared to the original design. Unlike the Black PVD finish of the G Crossover, the G400 iron head is finished with Ping’s HydroPearl finish that helps repel water. This allows the face to better grip the golf ball in damp conditions, producing more consistency.

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Available lofts for the Ping G400 Crossover include 3 (19 degrees), 4 (22 degrees) and 5 (25 degrees). They will sell for $247.50 per club.

Related

Discussion: See what GolfWRX members are saying about Ping’s G400 fairways, hybrids and Crossover

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He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

7 Comments

7 Comments

  1. Lou Cesarek

    Jul 17, 2017 at 8:21 pm

    Mizuno MX 700 Woods used the same technology
    At least 10 years ago.
    New. ?

  2. MrPoopoo

    Jul 15, 2017 at 5:00 am

    Looks like the Orlimar Trip-Metals are going to get a little boost in value on flea-bay.

  3. SKip

    Jul 11, 2017 at 5:19 pm

    I have Orlimar Trimetals from the 90’s that have Maraging Steel faces. Nothing new here. A lot of JDM clubs have been using maraging steel even way before that.

  4. Dweebly

    Jul 11, 2017 at 12:47 pm

    Everyone knows that’s all the fantastic new materials are just big standard run of the mill stuff don’t they? My favourite is still the gss Scotty Cameron. How he got people to pay over the odds for bargain basement stainless is marketing genius!

  5. Dave R

    Jul 10, 2017 at 11:41 pm

    Good looking clubs . Good for ping finally.

  6. I

    Jul 10, 2017 at 11:56 am

    The photos shows the 9 wood with 23.5, not 25?????

  7. Duke Nookem

    Jul 10, 2017 at 9:29 am

    Ping continues to make great improvements to its lineup. It lacks the over the top marketing like the other big companies but it’s not needed here. Product speaks for itself. Rumor has it there is an even lighter alloy in the works. 5-10% thinner….

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Whats in the Bag

Presidents Cup WITBs: U.S. Team

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Tiger Woods

Driver: TaylorMade M5 (9 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana D+ White 60 TX

3-wood: TaylorMade M5 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana D+ White 70 TX

5-wood: TaylorMade M3 (19 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana D+ White 80 TX

Irons: TaylorMade P7TW (3-PW)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: TaylorMade MG 2 “Tiger MT Grind” (56-12, 60-10 degrees)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Putter: Scotty Cameron Newport 2 GSS
Grip: Ping PP58 Blackout

Golf Ball: Bridgestone Tour B XS

Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet Cord

Patrick Reed

Driver: Ping G400 LST (9 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Black 70X

3-wood: Nike VR Pro LTD (15 degrees)
Shaft: Aldila Rogue Silver 125 80TX

Irons: Mizuno MP-18 (3), GrindWorks Patrick Reed “Proto” (4-PW)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: Artisan (50, 60), Titleist Vokey Design SM5 55
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Putter: Scotty Cameron “Captain America” Proto
Putter Grip: Iomic

Golf Ball: Titleist Pro V1

Grips: Golf Pride MCC

Xander Schauffele

Driver: Callaway Prototype Sub Zero (9 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD BB 7X

3-wood: Callaway Rogue Sub Zero (15 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI 8X

5-wood: Callaway Rogue Sub Zero (18 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI Black 8X

Irons: Callaway Apex Pro “Raw” (4-PW)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: Callaway Jaws MD5 “Raw” (52), Titleist Vokey Design SM6 (56), Titleist Vokey Design BV Proto (60)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Putter: Odyssey Stroke Lab Double Bend hosel

  • 540 weight
  • 15g weights
  • 34 3/8

Putter grip: SS Traxion 2.0 Tour (40g counter)

Golf Ball: Callaway Chrome Soft X

Grips: Golf Pride Z Cord Mid Size

Justin Thomas

Driver: Titleist TS3 (9.5 degrees, B1 setting)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana ZF 60 TX (44 7/8″)

3-wood: Titleist TS3 (15 degrees, A1 setting)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Blue 80 TX

5-wood: Titleist 915 Fd (18 Degrees)
Fujikura Motore Speeder VC  9.2 Tour Spec X

Irons: Titleist T100 (4), Titleist 620 MB (5-9)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design Raw SM7 (46-10 @47.5), Titleist Vokey Design Raw SM7 (52-12 @52.5), Titleist Vokey Design Raw SM7 (56-14 @57), Titleist Vokey Design Raw SM7 60T (@60.5)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold X100 Tour Issue (46), True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400 (52-60)
Length: Std Lie 64.5
Grip: TVC 60RD USD
Swing weight:  D3

Putter: Scotty Cameron X5

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

Webb Simpson

Driver: Titleist TS3 (10.5 degrees, A1 setting, Draw CG)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei Blue AV 65 TX (45.25″)

3-wood: Titleist TS2 (15 degrees, A1 setting)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Blue 70 TX

5-wood: Titleist 915 Fd (18 degrees, B1 setting)
Shaft: UST Mamiya VTS 86 TX

Hybrid 1: Titleist 913 Hd (21 degrees) B2 setting
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI 105 X

Hybrid 2: Titleist 913 HD (23.5 degrees) C3 setting
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Irons: Titleist 620MB (5-PW)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold X100

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design Raw SM7 (54-14), Titleist Vokey Design Raw SM5 (60-06K)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Ball: Titleist Pro V1

Patrick Cantlay

Driver: Titleist TS3 (10.5 degrees, C1 Setting/Draw CG)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana BF 60 TX

3-wood: Titleist 915F (15 degrees, B1 setting)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana BF 70 TX

Hybrid: Titleist 816 H2 (21 degrees, B1 setting)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei Blue 90 TX

Irons: Titleist T100 (4-9)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold 120X

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design SM7 Raw (46-10, 54-10, 56-08, 62-08)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold S300

Length: Std
Loft: 53, 57, 61
Lie: 63 on all
Grip: TV 58RD USD
Swt: D3, D2, D1, C9

Putter: Scotty Cameron

Ball: Titleist Pro V1X

Tony Finau

Driver: Ping G410 (9 degrees @8) Flat setting
Shaft: Accra TZ6 Proto M5 75 (Tip 1”)
D5, 44.75 Inches

3-wood: Ping G400 (14.5 degrees @14.25)
Shaft: Accra Tour Z 4100 (Tip 1.5”)
D3. 42 Inches

Irons

3-iron: Ping iBlade (20 degrees)
Shaft: Nippon Modus 3 120TX
D3

4-PW: Ping Blueprint
Shaft: Nippon Modus 3 120TX
D3

Wedges: Ping Glide 3.0 (50/SS @51), Titleist Vokey SM7 (56/10S, 60/08M)
Shaft: Nippon Modus 3 125TX

Putter: Piretti Elite “Custom”

Ball: Titleist Pro V1

Matt Kuchar

Driver: Bridgestone Tour B JGR (9.5 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Atmos Tour Spec 6S

3-wood: TaylorMade M6 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Speeder Evolution 757 X

Hybrids: Bridgestone Tour B XD-H (18 degrees), Ping Anser (20)
Shafts: Fujikura Motore Speeder TS 8.8 X flex

Irons: Bridgestone J15CB (5-PW)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold 105 S300 (soft stepped)

Wedges: Bridgestone J40 Forged (52 bent to 51 degrees); Cleveland RTX-4 (58 bent to 57 degrees), TaylorMade HighToe (64 bent to 63 degrees)
Shafts: KBS Tour 120 S

Putter: Bettinardi DASS KM-1 Arm Lock (soft carbon steel, 400 grams, 2.5 degrees loft)

Grip: Lamkin Arm Lock

Ball: Bridgestone Tour B X

Grips: Iomic X-Grip

Gary Woodland

Driver: Ping G410 Plus (9 degrees @8)
Shaft: Accra RPG Tour Z M5

3-wood: Titleist TS2
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI 100X

Utility: Wilson Staff (18 degrees)
Shaft: KBS C-Taper 130X

Irons: Wilson Staff Forged Blade 4-PW
Shaft: KBS C-Taper 130X

Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM7 (52/12F @53, 58/10/S), TaylorMade Hi-Toe (64)
Shafts: KBS Hi-Rev 2.0 125S

Putter: Scotty Cameron Newport

Ball: Bridgestone BX

Grips: Golf Pride BCT MidSize

Bryson DeChambeau

Driver: Cobra SpeedZone (9 degrees @7)
Shaft: LA Golf Shafts Tour B.A.D VD3 75TX

3-wood: Cobra King LTD (12.3 degrees)
Shaft: LA Golf Shafts Tour B.A.D 3VD1 75TX

5-wood: Cobra F8+ (17.5 degrees)
Shaft: LA Golf Shafts Tour B.A.D VD1 85-TX

Irons: Cobra King Utility (4, 5), Cobra King Forged (6-PW)
Shafts: LA Golf Shafts B.A.D Prototype Rebar

Wedges: Cobra King Tour Raw (50, 56, 60)
Shafts: LA Golf Shafts B.A.D Prototype Rebar

Putter: Sik C-Series

Ball: Bridgestone Tour B XS

Grips: Jumbo Max

Rickie Fowler

Driver: Cobra SpeedZone (10.5 degrees set at 9.5)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Black 70X 43 inches

3-4 wood: Cobra King F8+ (14.5 degrees)
Shaft: Aldila Synergy 70 X 42 inches

Utility: Cobra F9 Speedback (4, 20 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD IZ Proto

Irons: Cobra “RF Proto” Forged (4-PW)
Shafts: KBS C-Taper 125 S+

Wedges: Cobra King V-Grind Prototypes (52-10B, 54-10F bent to 56, 60F)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Putter: Scotty Cameron Circle T Newport 2 Proto
Grip: Standard Scotty Cameron Pistol

Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet Align “Rickie Custom”

Golf ball: 2019 TaylorMade TP5x (No. 15) Pix USA

Dustin Johnson

Driver: TaylorMade M5 (10.5 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Speeder 661 X Tour Spec 2.0

3-wood: TaylorMade M5 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Black 6.5 X

Irons: TaylorMade P790 (3-iron), TaylorMade P730 DJ Proto (4-PW)
Shafts: Project X HZRDUS Black 6.5 X (P790), True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: TaylorMade MG2 Black (52, 60 degrees), TaylorMade MG Hi-Toe (64 degrees)
Shafts: KBS Tour 120S

Putter: TaylorMade Spider Tour Black
Grip: SuperStroke Pistol GT 1.0

Ball: 2019 TaylorMade TP5x (No. 1) PIX “USA”

Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet

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Forum Thread of the Day: “Best players/cavity back irons with a thin top line?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from That’s two thus far Shooter who is on the hunt for players or even game improvement irons which “do the best job of mimicking blades with the sleek top line, minimal to no offset, and best feel possible out of a hollow or cavity construction”. Our members share their thoughts.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • bodhi555: “If I was after a player’s CB first one is be trying was the 620 CB, was checking out a set a couple of weeks ago and they look remarkably blade-like at address. More offset than I liked in the long irons, but a very attractive looking club.”
  • Valtiel: “If you’re willing to go older/used, the Bridgestone J40 CBs have one of the thinnest top lines I have seen on a CB. They are also legendarily soft feeling.”
  • leftylama: “Two cheap options would be Nike Vapor Pro Combo (hard to find a good set now though) or the Wilson FG V6.”
  • BogeyB54: “JPX 919 forged look great behind the ball, so do the HMBs.”
  • gibbyfan: “Miura 1007, if you are looking. Longer heal to toe than the MB. Thinner sole than the modern Miura irons. Head shape not as large as the 57s, possibly less offset.”

Entire Thread: “Best players/cavity back irons with a thin top line?”

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Forum Thread of the Day: “Optimal bag setup for a high handicapper?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from rkillian who has opened up a discussion on the optimal bag setup for high handicappers. Here’s a look at rkillian’s current set-up: 

“Driver 9 degree head turned up to 2 to 11 degrees. I get my most consistent ball flight and distance from this setting. The 9 gave me the best numbers that day in the store but up 2 degrees works much better for me on the course – Total average is about 270 set like this”

“HL 3 Wood at 16.5 Degrees – total average is 235 off the tee, but I have hit some into the 250s. But I can’t hit it off the deck whatsoever. I get lucky sometimes when I try and hit it off a mat at the range but never off actual turf.

3 Hybrid 19 degrees – a well-struck shot will go nearly that same distance as my 3 wood maybe 220. But a well-struck shot with this club is the anomaly here.

4 Hybrid 22 degrees – I can hit this club pretty consistently 200 yards plus if I don’t chunk it and up to 220 total or more on the right hole from a tee.

5i-PW at 45 Degrees – I don’t hit my 5 iron consistently, but I am “ok” with my irons. My 8 iron is my 150-yard club when well struck.

Gw at 52 – This almost never gets used. It is about a 110-yard full swing, and I have found that I am never really at that yardage.

Sw at 56 – about 90-95 yards on a full swing but it can balloon on my and fall short. I am finding I don’t use it on full swings often though. Pretty much use it 80 yards and in.

and of course the 3-putt machine.”

Our members have been sharing their thoughts in our forums, with a range of interesting ideas suggested.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • jvincent: “You don’t talk about how long the various clubs are or what shafts are in them, so this is somewhat a guess based on what you have said above. Definitely drop the 3W in favour of a 4W or 5W. Since it looks like the driver is working for you, try to get the same model of shaft, but in a heavier version. Make sure that the length of the fairway wood you end up with is no longer than 42.5″. I’d recommend 42″. You don’t say if the current hybrids are the same brand or not, but if not, try to get a 3 that matches your 4. Again, shaft weight and length are important. A long hybrid that you can’t hit aren’t any good to you. I’d keep the 5i. I would add back the 52* wedge. At your skill level, not having to manufacture a partial swing is going to be better in the long run. Again, if it doesn’t match your irons at least try to get the same shaft weight and make sure it is the correct length.”
  • ChipNRun: “Two main observations: FW Shaft. Your 3W/HL may have a common problem with TaylorMade FWs: the shaft is too long. The 3W/HL has the same shaft length as a 3W, not a 4W. If you trimmed shaft back to 42.5″, this might help get you the better control of a 4W. (assuming swing weight does not get too light – you could have fitter tip-weight it if it feels too feathery.) Work with a fitter to see if a shorter shaft might help. Lessons!! Since you shoot about 96, you need to tweak your golf swing before you tweak your bag mix. Get a swing tune-up lesson, and see if the pro can figure out adjustments you can make to hit the ball better. A lesson or two can take you farther in a month than you can get on your own in a full season. It appears you are stuck in the mud: find a pro who can help pull you out. Then, practice what the pro tells you – and play some holes if weather permits – before your next lesson.”
  • mkuether: “Very interesting topic! Like many others who have already posted, I think we have a lot in common. My distances are very similar to yours, and your scores are similar to where I was about ten years ago. I also struggled with my longer irons, hybrids, and especially fairway woods. The good news is that I was able to find a set that worked for me and improve significantly. I am sure you can do the same. First, the #1 thing that has helped me has been to simply get clubs I was comfortable with. It took me a while to find a hybrid that really suited me, but once I did, it made a huge difference in my confidence. I ended up dropping my 5-wood entirely because I was just never confident with it, but a 19-degree hybrid was much better (for me). I also stopped trying to hit a 3-wood off the deck (I was terrible at it) and reserved it for the occasional shot off the tee where I felt driver was too much. My 3-wood doesn’t get a lot of use since in my case I’m simply more confident with my 460cc driver, and I can usually throttle back and hit that shorter when needed. Anyway, I’m not sure why I’m so much more confident with my hybrids now (who knows, maybe they just suit my eye), but the confidence really helps. I also avoid playing clubs with longer than average shafts (e.g. my driver is 44.5″) and I find that really helps my confidence and consistency. If you’re already having trouble with fairway woods, longer shafts are only going to make it worse. I would also try and learn to hit your shorter irons as distance clubs on full swings, that has helped me a lot too. Knowing that I have a consistent, full-swing shot that I can hit a consistent distance (or pretty close) down to about 80 yards has definitely helped my scores. You seem to play an incredibly short course for your overall distance so I can’t imagine that you’re getting that much use out of your longer clubs anyway. Just curious, do you enjoy playing a course that short? I find it more fun to play a slightly longer course where I have a variety of shorts in the greens, seems like you would be hitting driver/wedge on every hole unless you’re teeing off with shorter clubs on purpose. In any case, a golfer of your skill level (or mine) is going to be missing the green on most approaches with a wood or hybrid, so it probably makes more sense to work on optimizing the bottom half of your bag since you’ll need to get up and down a lot. Anyway, good luck improving. I’m sure a little experimentation with different clubs will go a long way towards feeling more confident and playing better.”
  • CapnSwagga: “I don’t write much here I’m not a writer its easy to have something profound to say but to be able to eloquently write it I have not these skills, but I’ll try to make my point, I myself played the same game constantly trapped in trying to figure out what equipment was for me. A close friend and golf professional helped me tremendously after a few rounds, and it wasn’t any advice on my swing or what my equipment should be it was simply: stop. Stop thinking, stop worrying, stop analyzing (although it is very important to analyze post swing). We get a wrapped up in the idea of what’s supposed to be right or work or what we see on TV and in reality the one simple principle “hit the ball” gets shrouded over. People will go on and on who makes the best clubs or ball or what shaft is going to work the best for you, but any golfer could pick up any piece of crap and knock it out there…off grass, turf, mats, tees or even a strippers **** it’s the confidence to do what is required without any additional thought. I don’t disagree with suggestions others made above and gapping your bag is also very vital, so I’m sorry if my comment goes slightly off your topic I think having a solid practice regime and dedication are truly the tools to become better at golf. Thanks for the read.”

Entire Thread: “Optimal bag set-up for a high handicapper?”

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