Until they sold out of stores, Costco’s Kirkland Signature Golf Balls had the most buzz of any golf ball maybe ever, and they had GolfWRX members going CRAZY. It’s easy to see why; the 4-piece urethane golf balls were selling for only $30 per two dozen, roughly one third of the price of comparable products on the market.

It appears that a new “Kirkland Signature Performance One” golf ball has popped up on the USGA conforming list, updated on March 1.

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Based on information presented by the USGA, there are two Kirkland Signature models on the list — “Performance One” and “Tour Performance” — manufactured by SM Global LLC based in Seoul, Korea. The original Kirkland Signature golf balls were stamped “Tour Performance,” but a new “Performance One” is now on the list. According to the USGA conforming list, the Performance One will have a 4-layer construction and 360 dimples just like the original Costco ball.

KirklandGolfBalls

So, does this mean the Kirkland Signature golf balls will be back in stores? And how much will they sell for? What exactly is different about the new balls? For now, the future is uncertain, but this could be a good sign for fans of the Costco golf balls.

See what GolfWRX members are saying about Kirkland Signature Golf Balls.

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53 COMMENTS

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  1. The company that made balls for Taylormade in South Korea may have been replaced by a company in Taiwan…could not find any thing on the web about this..if so that South Korea company is free to make as many balls as Costco can sell?????

  2. I’m confused, the new replacement ball has been tested by the USGA and is on the Conforming List but is exactly the same as the one they previously sold. Was that ball on the Conforming List and if yes, why would an exact ball need to be tested? Oh it’s just a name change, then if that’s correct why aren’t they on the shelves? Sorry I’m always a skeptic.

  3. My club fitter gave me a Ksig to try. I haven’t even messed with it. I’ll eventually check it out when the season is in full swing, but I don’t get all the hype. I’ll still order 5 dozen Vice Pros or Pro +s at the beginning of every season. Not enough incentive for me to bother with Costco or the possible variability of the Ksig. Think about it. If they are in fact overruns of another product and they don’t have their own engineers and such to ensure quality and consistency – who’s to say the ball you played last month will be the same as the ball you play next month?

    • Because it’s a urethane ball that costs $1.25 a piece. I’m a budget golfer with a bazillion handicap who plays 12 year old irons acquired second hand and am a Costco member so I’m exactly the person who will line up to buy this. At that price, and at my level of skill, I’m willing to roll the dice on consistency between balls. My consistency in squaring the club face at impact is a much bigger issue than the quality of the ball I hit.

      • So at your skill level and consistency, why do you feel the need to hit a urethane ball? Why not just buy the Wilson Fly for $5/15?

        Just playing the devil’s advocate here. No offense. I just think the type of players that truly need that level of playability should also be thinking in terms of consistency and quality. With plenty of other players in the market and so many unknowns (currently) about the development of Ksisgs, why all the fanfare? I absolutely agree that the Titleist premium needs to die and other OEMs seem to recognize that (new Z-Stars @ $39.99/dz and similar pricing from Callaway).

      • I’m with TR1PTIK on this one. If you’re a high handicapper (I can relate, I shoot over 100) then a four-layer urethane ball is a novelty and you really could be playing with used balls. If hitting consistently is your biggest problem, the quality differences between a Noodle, Velocity, Chrome, RocketBallz, Pro V1 and a used ball will be indecipherable. The only difference I can tell between a Velocity and a Noodle or Nike is that my wallet gets lighter when I hit a Titleist into the bush.

  4. I’ll bet these new balls are completely different, but Costco is trying to capitalize on the original demand. The first run were balls manufactured with Taylormade cores that TM had left over and unloaded to Costco (like selling scraps). When they were gone…..they were gone. I highly doubt this new version is constructed with the same components.

    • Probably not. Costco has a tendency to market a single product that goes after the market leader, rather than having four versions. Kirkland isn’t known for its variety within the brand.

  5. Most urethane covered balls are made by big OEM’s in America by American workers. These balls are made in Korea. If you buy these balls, but complain about jobs being lost overseas, you are a HYPOCRITE.

    • Super happy that you play clubs that were 100% manufactured in N/A, wear shoes that were made here, use gloves that were also made here, clothing, sunglasses, electronic devices, etc… I mean, I wouldn’t want to call you a hypoc…

  6. I doubt the price will change much. Think like a retailer. They have these products called advertisement loss leaders. Laymen’s term. Gets people in the door, to spend more money. Costco found out people were buying more than a couple dozen balls. Costco is one of the best at getting people to spend money.

  7. People are talking about which overruns these will be not understanding where golf balls are made, how golf balls are made, and the background of the golf balls history.. This isn’t history class so I won’t get into all that business, but for those that think there is that big of a difference in a golf ball…… Welcome to never never land

  8. My guess is that Taylor Made felt “Tour Performance” was too close to “Tour Preferred” so they had to relabel it. Hopefully the ball itself is the same

  9. I have a feeling they are going to sell the comparable ball for a lot more and then the ball that is the same price as the old one will be a two piece distance ball. I hope I am wrong, I would like to try them if I stop in while they have them.

    • I’ll bet you’re right. Rather than just jacking the price up to where it should be on the Tour Performance ball they probably just had the manufacturer stamp Performance One on it so they can sell it for more by calling it a newer and better ball.

    • Maybe you did not see the chart at the bottom. Both balls appear to be 4 Piece. I am not sure what the “SC” means for the Tour Performance ball. Soft Compression maybe?

      • SC means Solid Core.

        They aren’t going to jack up the price. They’ll make them membership only and use it to sell memberships. They do this with a lot of products. Sell them at cost and make no profit but use them as leaders to sell memberships.

        • …So far, they seem to be pretty smart with their other offerings. They aren’t losing money on these, and they made the entry at a time when the “regular” golf market was generally depressed….Dick’s eliminating the PGA pros & shrinking the sqft in golf, Nike quit…I doubt they’re looking to jump in much beyond this and risk mission creep….just like when NIKE SWORE TO US – absolutely swore they’d “never end up like Top Flite”. “We’re just going to have these two premium balls (DD & TW) one mid-price and one soft”… keep it simple and they’ll do fine.

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