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In this video, I compare the driver swing of Jason Day and Dustin Johnson, two of the longest and most accomplished golfers in the world. I did this analysis at the request of my readers, as well as to show that there are many, many ways to swing a golf club effectively, even at the world-class level.

For more about me and how I teach, visit www.dennisclarkgolf.com or go to my Facebook Page

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Dennis Clark is a PGA Master Professional. Clark has taught the game of golf for more than 30 years to golfers all across the country, and is recognized as one of the leading teachers in the country by all the major golf publications. He is also is a seven-time PGA award winner who has earned the following distinctions: -- Teacher of the Year, Philadelphia Section PGA -- Teacher of the Year, Golfers Journal -- Top Teacher in Pennsylvania, Golf Magazine -- Top Teacher in Mid Atlantic Region, Golf Digest -- Earned PGA Advanced Specialty certification in Teaching/Coaching Golf -- Achieved Master Professional Status (held by less than 2 percent of PGA members) -- PGA Merchandiser of the Year, Tri State Section PGA -- Golf Professional of the Year, Tri State Section PGA -- Presidents Plaque Award for Promotion and Growth of the Game of Golf -- Junior Golf Leader, Tri State section PGA -- Served on Tri State PGA Board of Directors Clark is also former Director of Golf and Instruction at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort. He now directs his own school, The Dennis Clark Golf Academy at the JW Marriott Marco Island in Naples, Fla.. He can be reached at dennisclarkgolf@gmail.com

17 Comments

17 Comments

  1. Dennis Clark

    Jul 1, 2016 at 1:09 pm

    and blessed genetics!

  2. Phil Underhill

    Jul 1, 2016 at 7:30 am

    It’s incredible how long DJ keeps the clubface square past impact, in fact it appears that the club is more open 12″ past the ball !!

    It makes sense that this should happen given how shut he is at the top, and in fact generally seems like a logical way to swing

    • dennis clark

      Jul 1, 2016 at 8:54 am

      I think it good if you’re in the super high speed athletic mode as is his case. Not sure that has sufficient power for most though.

      • Phil Underhill

        Jul 1, 2016 at 9:10 am

        see what you mean, his length is due to the fact he’s 6’5″, athletic and has about 110º shoulder turn. could be potentially longer but maybe less straight

        take away the height and shoulder turn and you’re at Zach Johnson clubhead speed, and he’s in better shape than most!

    • bc

      Jul 1, 2016 at 1:31 pm

      Well he has to shut at the top because he wants to come into it with the face closed to target so he can his his busting cut and hold it off like that

  3. Dennis Clark

    Jun 30, 2016 at 2:22 pm

    The thing that goes unnoticed about DJ is the amount RIGHT WRIST cup he gets (and keeps) as a result of that left wrist flexion.

  4. Dennis Clark

    Jun 30, 2016 at 9:10 am

    long, lanky, supple, strong etc. not a lifetime swing IMO…

    • Canadian Smizzle

      Jun 30, 2016 at 10:10 am

      Uh oh. I am certainly leaning towards the dj model a fair bit. And wow did i ever pick up club head speed. I was around 97 and my fastest swing is 122 on a flightscope. 118 average. I hooked it at first but i recently figured out how to move the ball both ways again. But it is real hard to move the ball less left and right swinging that fast. 97 mph i could shape both ways.

  5. Jim

    Jun 29, 2016 at 5:54 pm

    As said, both super athletes, chances are they both would be just as good had they had learned from someone other then who they did…..it is called talent, hand eye coordination if you will. To much time is spent trying to explains why these guys and gals on tour are so good…it is simple, they just are that good.

    • dennis clark

      Jun 29, 2016 at 6:21 pm

      True Jim..the point of the analysis is how there are many ways that the great athletes accomplish what they do. Very different techniques from two world class athletes!

  6. Bob Pegram

    Jun 29, 2016 at 2:43 pm

    As you point out, Dustin Johnson is very shut at the top due to his bowed left wrist. But his left wrist is not bowed at impact. My guess is that he is very loose jointed and that was a way when he was a kid to keep from leaving the face way open and hitting it dead right. That is an easy mistake to make for people who are loose jointed including loose wrists, especially a skinny kid.

    • Dennis Clark

      Jun 29, 2016 at 3:24 pm

      somebody was smart enough to leave him alone…thank goodness. Someone had tried to “fix” that club face, we may have never heard of DJ…

      • Edley

        Jun 29, 2016 at 5:42 pm

        We would have, but probably as an athlete in a different sport.

        • Steve

          Jun 29, 2016 at 6:56 pm

          Not likely

        • Brian

          Jul 1, 2016 at 8:43 am

          In which sport? He was a good HS basketball player but he’s “only” 6’4″. That’s on the smallish side in the NBA except for guards, and DJ wasn’t a guard. He might be an athletic freak by golf’s standards, but he’s quite pedestrian by even NCAA basketball standards.

      • beejaybee

        Jul 1, 2016 at 12:17 pm

        Credit to Allen Terrell – CCU Golf Coach

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Listen to the podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes!

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Golf finds a way to take a hold on you… whether you become entranced by the skill of the world’s best professionals, fall in love with the feeling and beauty of a well-executed shot, or simply enjoy getting outside and having fun — the game is addictive.

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Listen to this episode on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes.

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