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In this video, I compare the driver swing of Jason Day and Dustin Johnson, two of the longest and most accomplished golfers in the world. I did this analysis at the request of my readers, as well as to show that there are many, many ways to swing a golf club effectively, even at the world-class level.

For more about me and how I teach, visit www.dennisclarkgolf.com or go to my Facebook Page

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Dennis Clark is a PGA Master Professional. Clark has taught the game of golf for more than 30 years to golfers all across the country, and is recognized as one of the leading teachers in the country by all the major golf publications. He is also is a seven-time PGA award winner who has earned the following distinctions: -- Teacher of the Year, Philadelphia Section PGA -- Teacher of the Year, Golfers Journal -- Top Teacher in Pennsylvania, Golf Magazine -- Top Teacher in Mid Atlantic Region, Golf Digest -- Earned PGA Advanced Specialty certification in Teaching/Coaching Golf -- Achieved Master Professional Status (held by less than 2 percent of PGA members) -- PGA Merchandiser of the Year, Tri State Section PGA -- Golf Professional of the Year, Tri State Section PGA -- Presidents Plaque Award for Promotion and Growth of the Game of Golf -- Junior Golf Leader, Tri State section PGA -- Served on Tri State PGA Board of Directors. Clark is also former Director of Golf and Instruction at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort. He now directs his own school, The Dennis Clark Golf Academy at the JW Marriott Marco Island in Naples, Fla.. He can be reached at dennisclarkgolf@gmail.com

17 Comments

17 Comments

  1. Dennis Clark

    Jul 1, 2016 at 1:09 pm

    and blessed genetics!

  2. Phil Underhill

    Jul 1, 2016 at 7:30 am

    It’s incredible how long DJ keeps the clubface square past impact, in fact it appears that the club is more open 12″ past the ball !!

    It makes sense that this should happen given how shut he is at the top, and in fact generally seems like a logical way to swing

    • dennis clark

      Jul 1, 2016 at 8:54 am

      I think it good if you’re in the super high speed athletic mode as is his case. Not sure that has sufficient power for most though.

      • Phil Underhill

        Jul 1, 2016 at 9:10 am

        see what you mean, his length is due to the fact he’s 6’5″, athletic and has about 110º shoulder turn. could be potentially longer but maybe less straight

        take away the height and shoulder turn and you’re at Zach Johnson clubhead speed, and he’s in better shape than most!

    • bc

      Jul 1, 2016 at 1:31 pm

      Well he has to shut at the top because he wants to come into it with the face closed to target so he can his his busting cut and hold it off like that

  3. Dennis Clark

    Jun 30, 2016 at 2:22 pm

    The thing that goes unnoticed about DJ is the amount RIGHT WRIST cup he gets (and keeps) as a result of that left wrist flexion.

  4. Dennis Clark

    Jun 30, 2016 at 9:10 am

    long, lanky, supple, strong etc. not a lifetime swing IMO…

    • Canadian Smizzle

      Jun 30, 2016 at 10:10 am

      Uh oh. I am certainly leaning towards the dj model a fair bit. And wow did i ever pick up club head speed. I was around 97 and my fastest swing is 122 on a flightscope. 118 average. I hooked it at first but i recently figured out how to move the ball both ways again. But it is real hard to move the ball less left and right swinging that fast. 97 mph i could shape both ways.

  5. Jim

    Jun 29, 2016 at 5:54 pm

    As said, both super athletes, chances are they both would be just as good had they had learned from someone other then who they did…..it is called talent, hand eye coordination if you will. To much time is spent trying to explains why these guys and gals on tour are so good…it is simple, they just are that good.

    • dennis clark

      Jun 29, 2016 at 6:21 pm

      True Jim..the point of the analysis is how there are many ways that the great athletes accomplish what they do. Very different techniques from two world class athletes!

  6. Bob Pegram

    Jun 29, 2016 at 2:43 pm

    As you point out, Dustin Johnson is very shut at the top due to his bowed left wrist. But his left wrist is not bowed at impact. My guess is that he is very loose jointed and that was a way when he was a kid to keep from leaving the face way open and hitting it dead right. That is an easy mistake to make for people who are loose jointed including loose wrists, especially a skinny kid.

    • Dennis Clark

      Jun 29, 2016 at 3:24 pm

      somebody was smart enough to leave him alone…thank goodness. Someone had tried to “fix” that club face, we may have never heard of DJ…

      • Edley

        Jun 29, 2016 at 5:42 pm

        We would have, but probably as an athlete in a different sport.

        • Steve

          Jun 29, 2016 at 6:56 pm

          Not likely

        • Brian

          Jul 1, 2016 at 8:43 am

          In which sport? He was a good HS basketball player but he’s “only” 6’4″. That’s on the smallish side in the NBA except for guards, and DJ wasn’t a guard. He might be an athletic freak by golf’s standards, but he’s quite pedestrian by even NCAA basketball standards.

      • beejaybee

        Jul 1, 2016 at 12:17 pm

        Credit to Allen Terrell – CCU Golf Coach

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Podcasts

Mondays Off: Bermuda vs. Bent grass, How to chip when into the grain

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How do you chip into the grain off of Bermuda grass without chunking the ball? Club pro Steve Westphal explains how to best handle the situation. Also, Westphal and Editor Andrew Tursky give advice on how to play in qualifiers or PAT (players assessment test) events, and they tell a few stories of their own.

Check out the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes!

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Opinion & Analysis

Women’s college golfers (and juniors) are getting significantly better, here are the stats

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Here’s the deal: If you are talking about women’s golf these days, especially at the elite level, you are talking about superstars! These girls are crazy good, and I wanted to take an opportunity to highlight some of the data to help better inform everyone.

Let’s start with a couple key highlights from the first couple of weeks of the 2018-19 season

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In 2018, Missouri women’s golf was likely the last team into the regional championship. To earn this right the team needed to average 295; scoring a decade earlier which would have likely made them a contender for being among the elite 10-15 teams in D1 golf! The fact is, in a little over a decade, the game has changed not a little, but a lot. Players from the past would have no chance to compete with today’s teams.

Why? Girls are simply stronger, better coached and more focused on golf. According to Joey Wuertemburger, a teaching professional with 100-plus college players

“The bar is getting raised every day, I’m seeing the next generation of women getting more athletic, which helps with the speed component but also with the ability to make changes quicker in their individual coaching programs.”

One example of the power of women’s golf is Emily Tubert. Emily, a former USGA champion, college golf standout at Arkansas and LPGA player recently hit it 322 yards in a nationally televised event. Emily is not even a complete outlier, look at club head speed data with driver collected by Trackman from the 2018-19 rosters at University of Arkansas

  • Player A: 108 mph
  • Player B: 106 mph
  • Player C: 101 mph
  • Player D: 97 mph
  • Player E: 96 mph
  • Player F: 93 mph
  • Player G: 90 mph

Arkansas is not an outlier either. Troy women’s coach Randy Keck notes two players on his team with club head speeds of 103-ish with the driver and a team average in the upper 90s. This means that players are hitting the ball on average at least 225 in the air. When playing courses of 6,200 yards, this gives them lots of opportunities to have short irons and attack short par 5s.

At the end of last year, according to GolfStat, four women’s teams (Alabama, UCLA, Arkansas, and Duke) had adjusted scoring averages under par, with the University of Alabama leading with 70.93. According to Mic Potter, head women’s coach at the University of Alabama, “Through eleven tournaments in 2017-18, our team was 111 under par. Thirty years ago, if a school averaged 300, or roughly 12 over per round, they were winning tournaments. In 2018 they are more likely to finish last. Student-Athletes are entering college more physically fit, with better technique, and more prepared to play at the highest level. This is reflected in their ability to score.”

The transformation of women’s golf can be seen throughout D1, as well as into other levels. One amazing example is the University of Indianapolis, the 2018 D2 women’s national champions and likely among the best D2 teams ever. According to Golfstat, for the 2017-18 season the adjusted score for the team was 73.45 which helped them win 11 times. Likewise, the women at Savannah College of Art had an amazing year in NAIA women’s golf with an adjusted scoring differential of 75.32.

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Women’s golf is on an excellent trajectory, which includes so much more depth, competition, and superior athletes who are driven to make their mark on the sport. Over the next five to seven years, it will be interesting to see these players develop in their quest to become the best players in the world — I cannot wait to see what happens!

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Equipment

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