Connect with us

Opinion & Analysis

Things you can’t really appreciate about The Masters unless you’ve been there

Published

on

First-time visitors to the Masters are struck by a couple things. Those of you who have been there know what I’m referring to, and I welcome some of your own observations as well. Those of you who watch on TV, however, would be quite surprised at a few things.

  • As beautiful as the golf course looks on TV, it is even more beautiful when you’re there. A former nursery, with flowering shrubs everywhere (each hole is named after the plants that were cultivated on that part of the property), one simply cannot exaggerate the natural beauty of Augusta National. I say natural because that is what is so unique about the place. Many golf courses have trees and flowers, but somehow they appear… uh, contrived. Upon gazing out over Augusta, one is struck by the setting which, as Bobby Jones once said, “Had been there forever just waiting for someone to lay a golf course on it.”
  • Another thing that cannot be fully appreciated is the size and, for lack of a better word, the “hilliness” of the 365 acres. The slopes at Augusta National are so severe that it is difficult to imagine the number of uneven lies the players face during the week. The clubhouse sits some 150 feet above the 12th green, and when you’re there, the severity of those hills is palpable. If a 6-foot man stood in front of the 14th green, the back of the green would likely be above his head.
  •  Augusta National is an absolute clinic in turf grass management. Its teeing grounds are easily a 9 on the stimpmeter, and would be considered good putting surfaces on many courses! On my very first visit many years ago, I was mesmerized watching the committee select and cut hole locations for the day’s play. There was a group of perhaps 3-4 members rolling putts, while another 3-4 of them watched. And then suddenly one of them said, “STOP! RIGHT THERE!” Notice that on any given year, when the weather permits, the hole locations are not more than 1-2 feet from where they always have been on that particular day every year.
  • The fairway mowing simply has to be seen live to believe it. It’s as coordinated as a Navy Blue Angel’s air show.
  • The green complexes, and the approach shots into them, are unique in every sense of the word. When you watch the broadcast, look at how open the greens are. They are out there all alone, surrounded by nothing. It’s a links-style feature to an inland property — no trees, no bushes and very little rough anywhere near any of the greens.
  • One cannot help being struck by the civility of the tournament. And it’s not in a forced kind of way. It, too, seems so utterly natural (yeah, there’s that word again). It’s like babies know not to cry and dogs know not to bark. For that reason, there’s actually very little marshalling needed. Everyone enjoys the event because, well, that’s just what you do at the Masters.
  • The hospitality tents, famous for the pimento and cheese sandwiches and cheap draft beers, are actually quiet. And with some 30,000 patrons on the grounds, no one waits in line. How do they manage this when every other sporting event in the world struggles with it? The service attendants take such pride in what they’re doing.
  • Amen Corner has to be the most private place in all of tournament golf for the players. After leaving the No. 11 tee, golfers are playing all by themselves for the next hour or so.
  •  The pitch shots the players face into Nos. 13 and 15 would scare the living daylights out of the average golfer. It’s like pitching off a green that’s sloped seriously downhill. A 15-handicap might drop a bucket of balls there and not get one on either of those greens. I often think that’s why so many guys guys go for those greens in two; they dread that pitch.
  • If you go to the Masters one year, and go back the next year, you would NEVER know if they moved a tee or a green, which they do often. Every change looks like the green, tee or fairway, whatever was moved, has always been there. There’s not even a trace of the previous year’s placement. It is truly remarkable.
  • The famous “roars” you hear so much about are underplayed, if anything. They are even louder than you hear on TV, and when they stop there’s all of a sudden funereal silence.

If you haven’t been to the Masters and if you ever get an invite, stop all plans (quit your job if you must) and DO NOT pass up the opportunity. I’m lucky enough to have been to many of the best places in sports, but there’s nothing quite like a week at Augusta. Maybe I’m a little partial, and that’s OK, too.

Your Reaction?
  • 151
  • LEGIT14
  • WOW8
  • LOL2
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK7

Dennis Clark is a PGA Master Professional. Clark has taught the game of golf for more than 30 years to golfers all across the country, and is recognized as one of the leading teachers in the country by all the major golf publications. He is also is a seven-time PGA award winner who has earned the following distinctions: -- Teacher of the Year, Philadelphia Section PGA -- Teacher of the Year, Golfers Journal -- Top Teacher in Pennsylvania, Golf Magazine -- Top Teacher in Mid Atlantic Region, Golf Digest -- Earned PGA Advanced Specialty certification in Teaching/Coaching Golf -- Achieved Master Professional Status (held by less than 2 percent of PGA members) -- PGA Merchandiser of the Year, Tri State Section PGA -- Golf Professional of the Year, Tri State Section PGA -- Presidents Plaque Award for Promotion and Growth of the Game of Golf -- Junior Golf Leader, Tri State section PGA -- Served on Tri State PGA Board of Directors. Clark is also former Director of Golf and Instruction at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort. He now directs his own school, The Dennis Clark Golf Academy at the JW Marriott Marco Island in Naples, Fla.. He can be reached at dennisclarkgolf@gmail.com

12 Comments

12 Comments

  1. B Hock

    Apr 8, 2016 at 8:00 pm

    Spot on!

  2. Double Mocha Man

    Apr 7, 2016 at 10:56 am

    Google a map of Augusta National, put it in earth mode, and pull out to notice the course right next to it… that’s Augusta Golf Club. In fact, one of their holes parallels Amen Corner on the more famous course. But mostly, notice the incredible differences in courses from an aerial view!

    • Dennis clark

      Apr 7, 2016 at 3:42 pm

      Augusta Country Club, there’s talk of Augusta National buying that place to increase their acreage.

  3. Deano

    Apr 6, 2016 at 6:58 pm

    I went in 2005 to a practice round, and brought my stepdad who was visiting from up North. Get this – we got the tickets off of eBay for like $75/ea. I thought I was going to get ripped off but lo and behold, they were legit. Pretty cool. I searched all day for a weed and I finally found one near a drain by the 13th fairway. Place is pretty immaculate. My biggest ‘ah ha’ moment was how close some of the holes are to each other. On TV they look like every hole is isolated but not so. Was also amazed at the elevation change from 9 fairway to 9 green (made me feel even worse for Norman in ’96). You look out to the right of 9 at the bottom of the fairway, and you could probably fit a full carnival in the green space. I don’t know what they use that real estate for but it’s pretty expansive.

    Side note – practice rounds are the way to go to PGA tourneys. The players are so much more relaxed and conversational when they aren’t playing for their livelihood. Whether it’s Augusta (DiMarco taunting the Georgia fans with his Gator calls) or East Lake (noticing Ernie’s pro-am team is trailing by like 10, and hearing him say ‘we’ve got ’em rrright where we want ’em!), to spending 5 mins 1:1 with Fred Funk as tells you why 17 at Sawgrass is way tougher than the 230 yder at East Lake, it’s just a different experience. I highly recommend it.

  4. Big Bri

    Apr 6, 2016 at 2:30 pm

    This was a great read. I have been lucky enough to win the lottery for practice round tickets a couple times. It is absolutely fantastic, and something EVERY golfer, regardless of skill level, would thoroughly enjoy. I disagree about the comment that it’s not for the common man. They keep ticket prices and food and beverage prices well below what other similar sporting events charge, and they don’t charge for parking. I enter the lottery every year, and every year anxiously await whether or not I win! This article was spot on!

    • Dennis Clark

      Apr 6, 2016 at 2:57 pm

      I agree, especially on practice rounds. The public does have some access and prices are CHEAP. The tickets for the event itself are spoken for pretty much for life! As a PGA member, I can go anytime but I CANNOT bring a family member or anyone but a fellow PGA buddy. Glad you enjoyed the observations and enjoy the event.

    • MarkB A

      Apr 6, 2016 at 8:37 pm

      +1 About the free parking and relatively low cost food and drink prices. They treat the patrons better than most sports venues.

      I appreciate that the patrons are well behaved and do not act like idiots.

      I know the place is totally pristine but is the water in the lakes and creeks stagnant? The only thing I sort of don’t like about Augusta is the lakes look like little fake ponds.

  5. birdy

    Apr 6, 2016 at 11:40 am

    unless you’re lucky enough to be one of the few chosen ones who win the lottery, the masters isn’t for the common man. ticket prices for single day going in the thousands. the masters loves to pretend they are a tournament for the average golf fan, when in reality its a tournament for only those with large wallets.

    • Bart

      Apr 6, 2016 at 12:04 pm

      Where on Earth did you get the impression the Masters pretends it’s for the average golf fan? Everything about the event screams exclusivity.

    • Dennis Clark

      Apr 6, 2016 at 2:03 pm

      Birds, nothing common about Augusta… It is exclusive, exclusive(er) and exclusive(est). no doubt; i was only commenting about the grounds and the event. Thx

    • Dennis Clark

      Apr 6, 2016 at 2:09 pm

      Meant to write Birdy…sorry

  6. Jordan G

    Apr 6, 2016 at 10:27 am

    Great article! i was there for the practice round on monday and all of these are completely true!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Podcasts

The Gear Dive: Golf prodigy Cole Hammer talks equipment, not turning pro, committing to Texas

Published

on

Cole Hammer, who once qualified for the 2015 U.S. Open at 15 years old, joins The Gear Dive Podcast with Johnny Wunder to discuss equipment, being a Freshman at the University of Texas, committing for 4 years, not turning pro and his crazy big summer including a win at the 2018 Western Amateur.

Check out the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes!

Your Reaction?
  • 19
  • LEGIT8
  • WOW9
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB1
  • SHANK4

Continue Reading

Podcasts

TG2: GolfWRX Forum Member “Warrick” explains his love for Mizuno irons

Published

on

GolfWRX forum celebrity “Warrick” explains what he loves so much about Mizuno irons, where he got his name from, how he became a gear head, what’s in his bag currently, his all-time favorite golf course and more. Also, GolfWRX equipment expert Brian Knudson talks about playing Oakland Hills Country Club in Michigan for the first time.

Checkout the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes!

Your Reaction?
  • 10
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK4

Continue Reading

Opinion & Analysis

Golfholics Course Review: Spyglass Hill Golf Course

Published

on

In this new course review series, Marko and Mike from Golfholics provide their takes on the golf courses they’ve played around the world. The first episode starts with the famed, yet often overlooked Spyglass Hill. Enjoy the video below, and don’t forget to check out more videos from Golfholics on their YouTube page!

Your Reaction?
  • 85
  • LEGIT16
  • WOW7
  • LOL1
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB0
  • SHANK2

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Facebook

Trending