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Spotted: True Temper Dynamic Gold AMT shafts

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True Temper’s Dynamic Gold AMT shafts are designed with what the company is calling “ascending mass technology,” creating a set of iron shafts that gets progressively heavier as golfers move from their long irons to wedges.

The 3-iron shaft is the lightest in the set, and each subsequent shaft gets three grams heavier as the set progresses. That results in wedge shafts that weigh between 125 and 130 grams, depending on flex, which is the standard weight of True Temper’s most popular Dynamic Gold iron shafts: R300, S300 and X100.

[quote_box_center]What we found, particularly in the longer irons, is that they launched a little higher just by virtue of the increased speed [from lighter weight],” said Chad Hall, True Temper’s Vice President of Global Sales. “That’s true for most players. From a wedge perspective, you’re talking about the same exact performance.” [/quote_box_center]

The AMT shafts use the company’s variable wall technology (VWT), which allows engineers to manipulate the wall thicknesses throughout the entirety of a shaft to reach the desired weight. They still maintain what Hall called the “Dynamic Gold DNA,” however, meaning that they offer a very similar balance point and trajectory as the original models.

Hall expects the new shafts to be popular with better golfers, including tour players, as well as golfers who felt the Dynamic Gold shafts were too heavy for them to be effective in their long and mid irons.

The Dynamic Gold AMT is a tour-only product at this point with no immediate plans for release. Golfers should expect to see them in stores in 2016, Hall said.

Click here to see what GolfWRX Members are saying about the shafts in our forum.

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12 Comments

12 Comments

  1. kev

    Jun 23, 2016 at 2:51 am

    i just think they have too many S200 and dynalite shafts they need to get rid of.

  2. Jericho

    Mar 23, 2015 at 11:34 am

    What’s the difference in these and the “DG PRO” ..”Progressive” ..starts at 125g in the wedge and drops 3 grams per club to the 3 iron at around 100ish..kick point gets progressively lower from wedge to long iron .. Or is the white label Tour issue also descends in weight but maintains the same kick ??

    • Steve Barry

      Mar 31, 2015 at 11:59 am

      The DG Pro is really like the flighted PX shafts, where as the weight is pretty close, but the flight is not. These don’t mention anything about flight, but the assumption is it would be similar as a lighter shaft in the longer irons may produce higher shots.

      If they put the PRO and AMT in a room together with some Barry White, you might have the ultimate shaft; progressive weighting getting heavier for the shorter clubs and having higher launching long irons with more piercing short irons.

  3. jj

    Feb 24, 2015 at 1:10 am

    Its a tour shaft only…… so why should we give a flying F!

  4. gocanucksfan123

    Feb 23, 2015 at 3:00 am

    So basically this is the same idea as the Ping AWT shafts from a couple years back

  5. FTWPhil

    Feb 20, 2015 at 12:45 pm

    So would I be correct on assuming these are parallel tip?

    • gunmetal

      Feb 22, 2015 at 1:02 pm

      No, they would be tapered so as to fit OEM iron heads

  6. Mats "PUMP 2" Bergsten

    Feb 18, 2015 at 9:56 am

    I rather go and get MOI fitted by a professinal club maker/fitter. But who am I to judge!? Golf and feeling is highly individual, TT DG AMT might be a great success…. 🙂

  7. M

    Feb 18, 2015 at 2:19 am

    It basically pretends to be an MOI-matched built set of irons.

  8. Jericho

    Feb 17, 2015 at 11:50 pm

    Like Black Gold ?

  9. Ryan rymail00

    Feb 17, 2015 at 8:44 pm

    So am I wrong in thinking that these are a kinda flighted lighter DG, like an ascending weighted Tour Concept?

  10. Kim

    Feb 17, 2015 at 7:03 pm

    This shaft sounds like a comeback of the True Temper Tri-Gold shaft from the 1990’s. That shaft had ascending weight and progressive bend point. It was a very good shaft but never really caught on.

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Puma Golf teams up with Ernie Els in support of Autism Awareness Month

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Puma X Els Autism

April is National Autism Awareness Month, and Puma Golf has teamed up with ambassador Ernie Els in support of the Els for Autism Foundation.

Throughout April, Puma will donate a portion of every individual sale of the brand’s Ignite Pwradapt Caged shoes with the proceeds going towards the Els for Autism Foundation.

Puma X Els Autism

Every pair of Caged shoes sold this month will include a blue Els for Autism shoe bag and puzzle piece ribbon lapel pin – with the color blue and the puzzle pieces representing Autism Awareness.

Puma X Els Autism

The Els for Autism Foundation helps deliver and facilitate programs designed to serve individuals with autism spectrum disorder. You can purchase the shoes here.

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What GolfWRXers are saying about “Boutique brands vs Major OEMs”

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In our forums, our members have been discussing both boutique brands and major OEMs and why the former “trail the OEMs in drivers and woods”. WRXer ‘gr8 flopshot’, who plays a bag full of boutique clubs bar woods, poses the question and it’s got our members talking in our forum.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • DaRiz: “Irons, wedges, and putters don’t change much, and for all the technology OEMs try to pack in there, it’s more about how they look and feel. So boutique can fit in nicely here. Drivers/FW, on the other hand, definitely benefit from the millions of dollars in R&D, and it is probably really hard to compete. You can argue that COR is maxed out, but the tiny changes in launch conditions, spin rates, and forgiveness add up.”
  • MattM97: “One reason why I and most other lefties don’t go boutique is options. At least with OEM’s for drivers and most woods we get the most of what is released, some versions and loft we don’t get but better than nothing. I’m not against boutique; I love my putters, I love the look of a lot of wedges, I would absolutely love a set of Japanese forged CB irons one day. Just woods I’ll stick to OEM options.”
  • sniper: “The Wishon 560’s I had built years ago were as good (or better) as anything I’ve had. My current set of MP-18SC’s and Wishon’s are the best feeling irons I’ve played. Both came from a club builder and not built by the OEM. Obviously on the Wishon’s.”
  • RogerInNewZealand: “Genuinely good point. It’s like why we buy JDM, Yonex Ezone 420…and the famed J33 Bridgestone driver from long ago! T.E.E is another one..always a surprise there. With your wood/driver if your sorted that’s fine! You don’t have to bag an exotic club to hit fairways.”

Entire Thread: “Boutique brands vs Major OEMs”

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What GolfWRXers are saying about simulators

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@trackmangolf

In our forums, WRXer ‘luvofgolf’ has kicked off a discussion on simulators wanting to know if purchasing one would improve his overall game. Our members discuss their views on simulators with the majority believing they are most beneficial as a supplement to lessons.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • pgetzen: “Agree with all of the comments regarding lessons. Although I have a Skytrak with a video set up, it’s really a big luxury. I use it basically as a virtual driving range for the days when I want to hit balls, and it might be too cold or raining. So it’s useful to me to keep my swing in sync, but I work on my swing separately.”
  • Higgs66: “Being able to hit balls any time indoors, at home and have fun doing it.. go for it. Will it make you a better golfer, it could but don’t always trust the feedback. There are so many dynamics to the game.. rhythm + tempo = power. They also can double as a home theater.”
  • 2down: “You’d be playing indoors, but you would be playing. I’m not doing that right now. But will it help your game? Yea. Repetition is a good thing. But be careful, I tried one a year ago at a course near me. First swing with the driver I hit the frame they had us in. Kept going but modified my swing to not hit that bar at the top. Screwed me up for a bit. So wow, you’ll get to play, and repetition is good but ensure your space is adequate for your swing.”
  • sfong33: “Agree with most posts here, anything good that works well indoors starts at the Skytrak. As others have stated, even if you were to obtain a simulator improvement will be based mainly on how well you can self diagnose in the absence of lessons. Lessons by themselves are no guarantee either; you have to find an instructor that can diagnose well and can get you to do what he/she wants (assuming they are correct in the initial diagnosis phase).”

Entire Thread: “Is a simulator worth it?”

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