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The golf club market can be a confusing place for consumers, no matter their skill level. The latest and greatest products that are designed by modern manufacturers are usually the best performing options when properly fit to your swing. The only problem is, new clubs are also typically the most expensive options.

In a sport that’s already quite expensive, is making the investment on new clubs always worth the high price tags?

Here at GolfWRX.com, we believe that whether you’re buying expensive new equipment or more affordable used options, you should get a proper club fitting from an expert fitter. Factors such as club length, loft, lie angle, overall design, weight settings, shaft flex, shaft weight and even grip size can all make a drastic impact on how the club feels and performs to the individual golfer. It’s not easy trying to figure out all of that by yourself, so working with an expert is imperative.

Now, when it comes to deciding on buying old versus new clubs, the conversation becomes a little more personalized to your specific budget and performance needs.

When you look at the clubs that are being used on the PGA Tour, most professional golfers opt to use the newest equipment possible, or they have clubs that are customized and prototyped to their exact liking.

That’s not always the case, however. Sometimes, PGA Tour players use golf clubs that were released several years ago, and they are still available on the current market for a more affordable price. Although the clubs are older designs, some Tour players still find benefits because the designs have managed to withstand the test of time.

I call these clubs the “Modern Classics.”

The benefit for consumers when it comes to these Modern Classics is that they’re currently available on the market for a fraction of the cost of new equipment, but they’re still viable options to use – even on the PGA Tour.

For our new 8-part club testing series in partnership with 2nd Swing Golf, I chose 8 classic golf clubs that are still used on the professional level, and each club can still be found online at 2nd Swing Golf’s website, or at 2nd Swing Golf retail outlets. Although these used clubs can be found at other third-party retail sites, as well, we chose to conduct this testing at 2nd Swing because, in my personal opinion, they have one of the largest selections of used equipment on the market, and they certify the quality of each club that they sell.

Also, the 2nd Swing store in Scottsdale has over 15 fitting bays that are equipped with launch monitors, and they have a team of expert club fitters to help analyze the numbers.

The first club that I chose to test in this 8-part video series was a TaylorMade Tour Preferred MC 4-iron that was first released to the public in 2011. As we’ve discussed at length at GolfWRX.com, PGA Tour player Daniel Berger still uses a set of TaylorMade TP MC 2011 irons.

For this specific test, I pitted a used TaylorMade TP MC 2011 4-iron (22 degrees) against my current gamer 4-iron (24 degrees) from my set of golf clubs; each club was shafted with an extra stiff steel shaft. I hit 5 shots with each club, using a high-end tour golf ball. We deleted any outliers, and then we analyzed the numbers with the help of 2nd Swing expert fitter Cliff Walzak, who’s a well-respected and longtime club fitter in the industry.

In the video at the top of the page, we break down the entire test, the launch monitor numbers, and then I assign a value rating to the club. Just a heads up, not every club tested in the series will score such a high rating, but we happened to start off with an especially top-tier Modern Classic.

If you’re interested in testing/purchasing the TaylorMade TP MC 2011 irons for yourself, they’re currently available on 2nd Swing’s website for $84.99 for an individual iron, or $339.99 for an entire set.

What other 7 clubs do you think I chose for this Modern Classics video series?

*Credit to Saeyae for the video production.

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He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

10 Comments

10 Comments

  1. Nadia Comaneci

    Jan 18, 2023 at 5:28 pm

    Good video, but what is nine-point-four?

  2. Danon

    Jan 17, 2023 at 2:16 pm

    Original Callaway Apex Pro irons should be on this list in my opinion. They’ve certainly withstood the test of time with some pros still gaming the longer irons from that 2013/14 release.

  3. Joey Horn

    Jan 17, 2023 at 1:29 pm

    Am I missing the comparison data? All I see is numbers for the 2011 TM TP MCs. What are we comparing this too?

  4. Mark

    Jan 17, 2023 at 12:54 am

    Forgive me for being blunt, but unless you are testing clubs with matching specifications (SW, grip make and size, shaft make and flex, loft, etc.), nothing of value will be learnt here.

    This type of test is best suited for mainstream golf publications catering to the uneducated. The GolfWRX readership is not well served by this.

    • wrx staff lol

      Jan 21, 2023 at 5:49 pm

      Haven’t you seen that is basically what wrx is from their staff… They can be torched quite easily by a good amount of people on here…

  5. Tom K

    Jan 16, 2023 at 6:25 pm

    Didn’t want to sit through the video. How did the old irons tack up?

  6. Branson Reynolds

    Jan 16, 2023 at 6:10 pm

    From the looks the drivers are GBB, g400, ‘16M2, fairways are rocketballz, nike vr, taylormade burner, with an Adams idea pro hybrid

  7. ac

    Jan 16, 2023 at 1:02 pm

    Testing the Taylormade R1 vs. Stealth 2 would be great as well.
    The others I would love to see are player distance product, since there is the “tec” involved. Something like P790 vs. Mizuno H5?

  8. Eastpointe

    Jan 16, 2023 at 11:56 am

    Gotta test the Stensons. Both the 3wd and shovels

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Equipment

VRST Golf unveils new clothing line for 2023

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This week, a new golf clothing line was announced by VRST Golf.

The brand launched in 2021 and is a men’s apparel line that brings style and versatility to both the athlete and everyday man, where pieces can be worn for training to casually getting around town.

With the Golf season right around the corner, their first-ever golf collection brings modern style that can be worn on-course and off. You can find all of the available items here: VRST

VRST Golf offers versatile and trendy golf tops, bottoms, and layering pieces. The line provides styling options for the versatile golfer with gear that goes beyond the course. The collection is now available online and at select DICK’S Sporting Goods and Golf Galaxy locations and will be expanding to over 180 store locations by end of February.

Check out VRST’s launch video here:

 

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Equipment

Odyssey Tri-Hot 5K lineup now includes mallets

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What you need to know: In January 2022, in the name of creating a blades with the MOI of mallets and forward CG, Odyssey threw everything at the wall with the Tri-Hot 5K family of blade putters: stainless steel, tungsten, 6061 aircraft grade aluminum. A year later, the company is bringing the same technology package to mallets with the Rossie and Seven models. The Tri-Hot 5K lineup now stands at seven putters (four with multiple necks).

2023 Odyssey Tri-Hot putters: Features and technology

Engineers applied the “Tri-Hot formula” utilized in blade putters in 2022 to move CG forward and raise MOI for a more forgiving mallet design — and a 5,000 IZZ inertia level (hence “5K”). Golfers will see improved speed and spin control, as well as consistency on off-center hits, according to the company, resulting in golf balls that finish closer to the hole when sub-optimally struck.

Stainless steel front: Odyssey touts the side-spin reducing capabilities of the 303 stainless steel hosel and face area for off-center putts. Tighter dispersion and putts that a more likely to go in results. Acting in a complementary fashion, the rear of the mallets are milled for tighter shape and weight tolerances that allows the CG to remain forward.

Tungsten front weights: Up to 120 grams of tungsten is positioned behind the face in the heel and toe sections of the putter heads. The resulting forward CG improves roll and increases inertia.

Interchangeable front weights: Available in 5, 10, 15 and 20 grams to dial in head weight and performance.

White Hot insert: 2023 Tri-Hot 5K putters add the iconic two-part urethane White Hot insert, which was originally developed using the same material as Callaway’s Rule 35 golf ball. White Hot, with its “firm but soft” properties has been a long-time favorite of Callaway staffers and recreational golfers. According to Callaway, “They’ve been asking for us to bring these technologies back and we’ve listened.” Can’t argue with that.

Stroke Lab shaft: The newest generation of Callaway’s multi-material Stroke Lab shaft features a shortened steel section and reduced weight (seven grams). Additionally it is stiffer. All of this leads to more stability and consistency.

Additional model details

Full lineup details — and who they’re for — including 2022 releases, via Callaway. 

One: A classically shaped heel toe weighted putter with a crank neck hosel creating moderate toe hang making it suitable for strokes that have moderate arc and face rotation

Two: A classically shaped heel toe weighted putter with a crank neck hosel creating moderate toe hang making it suitable for strokes that have moderate arc and face rotation. Less rounded than the One.

Three: A classically shaped heel toe weighted putter with a flow neck hosel yielding more toe hang making it suitable for strokes with more aggressive swing arc and face rotation

Double Wide (CH, CB): CH: A wide blade with a crank neck hosel yielding moderate toe hang making it suitable for strokes with moderate swing arc and face rotation. CS: Face-balanced center shafted wide blade making it suitable for strokes with minimal swing arc and face rotation

Triple Wide (DB, CS): DB: A face-balanced double bend wide blade making it suitable for strokes with minimal swing arc and face rotation. CS: A face-balanced center shafted wide blade making it suitable for strokes with minimal swing arc and face rotation.

Rossie: (DB, S): DB: A face-balanced double bend mallet suitable for strokes with minimal arc and face rotation. S: A mallet with a short slant hosel, suitable for strokes with arc and face rotation.

Seven (DB, S, CH): DB: A face-balanced double bend mallet suitable for strokes with minimal arc and face rotation. S:  mallet with a short slant hosel, suitable for strokes with arc and face rotation. CH: a mallet with a crank hosel, suitable for strokes with moderate arc and face rotation.

Pricing and availability

At retail: March 2, 2022

Price: $399.99

Standard grip: Odyssey Tri-Hot 5K Pistol

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Equipment

Best players irons of 2023 – GolfWRXers discuss

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In our forums, our members have been discussing the best ‘Players’ irons of 2023. WRXer ‘odshot68’ kicks off the thread saying, “Looking to get a new set of players irons this spring and wondering what you guys like. Distance control is very important; I’m not a fan of irons with hotspots,” and our members have been selecting their favorites from recent releases in our forum.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • noodle3872: “Titleist T100/T100S should be in the conversation.”
  • sadclevelandsports: “I love my T100s, but recently tried the new Cobra CBs, and they are just as high quality.”
  • edwelly: “I have been fortunate enough to have several nice sets of irons. A couple of Maura sets and, most recently, the Bridgestone J40s. Today I took out my new Srixon ZX5/ZX7s, and they are phenomenal irons. I cannot recommend those enough. “
  • KevCannon: “T100 should be on the shortlist to try.”

Entire Thread: “Best Players irons of 2023 – GolfWRXers discuss”

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