Connect with us

19th Hole

Michael Jordan convinced PGA Tour pro to reject LIV Golf

Published

on

Rumors abound that more PGA Tour players are going to jump ship to the LIV Golf Series after the US Open, including reports claiming that Abraham Ancer is 100% gone to the Saudi-backed tour, but Harold Varner III will not be one of them.

The New York Post reported on Saturday that, in an email received on June 10, Varner’s agent confirmed their charge would not be leaving the PGA Tour.

Varner’s agent, Preston Lyon, wrote, “He is a PGA Tour player and constantly working towards being one of the best golfers in the world. It is our full intention to make a run at the FedEx Cup championship in August.”

According to the Sports Business Journal, Varner reached the decision after a conversation with basketball superstar Michael Jordan, with whom he has struck up a “business relationship”, wearing the Jordan logo on his apparel. However, the relationship has “extended to a friendship as well.”

The 31-year-old, winner of the Saudi International in February, sought advice from a few but name checked Jordan as, “I’m sure he’s had decisions like this long before I was even born.”

Currently inside the world’s top-50, Varner has access to all the majors and, having spoken frankly with PGA Tour commissioner Jay Monahan, concluded that, “I’m obviously not going. I’ve spoken with Jay. I’ve spoken with a lot of people I look up to and it just wasn’t worth it to me for what it was worth.”

Whilst strong chit-chat suggests the likes of Rickie Fowler and Viktor Hovland are still in the frame for an approach, the Norwegian told his home newspaper that he has no plans to join LIV, whilst 33-year-old Fowler was clear that he would like to see the two tours “co-exist” and that there has been a lot of false accusations.

Those accusations slowed down over the weekend of the US Open but are expected to continue apace as we approach the Travelers Championship this weekend.

More from the 19th Hole

Your Reaction?
  • 88
  • LEGIT8
  • WOW8
  • LOL6
  • IDHT5
  • FLOP1
  • OB3
  • SHANK11

7 Comments

7 Comments

  1. Rob

    Jun 21, 2022 at 10:29 am

    Manohan jumped the shark when he removed tournaments from Trump owned courses.

    Didn’t that pea-brain understand some players might not appreciate being used as political pawns?

    • Thomas Woodward

      Jul 5, 2022 at 7:10 pm

      SO TRUE!! Btw, Varner hasn’t done much on the PGA Tour so his stock is kinda low at this moment and there are BIGGER fish to land on the LIV Golf Tour that currently has 20 Major wins playing in that 48 man filed. Will the filed grow? ABSOLUTELY, and will more major winners sign UP? YOU BETCHA!

  2. David Shipley

    Jun 21, 2022 at 9:41 am

    Any sensible human without generational $ would take it if offered. Those being critical either have generational wealth or stand to gain (or lose) based on players living. IMO it’s a PR nightmare for the tour and Manohan (sp?) overplayed his hand and the tour he’s paid 30+million to run and protect is at risk as it should be. If they aren’t careful they run real risk of losing the 501 (tax free) status.

  3. Get Real

    Jun 20, 2022 at 12:53 pm

    WTF?! HVIII, you needed convincing that this was a bad idea? Seriously? C’mon man!

    • Livininparadise

      Jun 20, 2022 at 11:29 pm

      Are you saying that turning down millions in guaranteed money is a bad idea? HVIII doesn’t look like he will be winning anytime soon. Why not take the money?

      • Mike

        Aug 29, 2022 at 11:43 pm

        Agree. But I bet MJ sweetened the pot enough to make him stay. Would look bad also if the tour’s only other African-American golfer jumped ship.

  4. Pingback: ‘Hard to root for Sergio, the man’ – Pro delivers damning verdict on Garcia and other LIV stars – GolfWRX

Leave a Reply

Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

19th Hole

‘What’s going on?’ – Justin Thomas left frustrated with two officials over ruling at Hero

Published

on

During Thursday’s first round of the Hero World Challenge, Justin Thomas called for a rules official and subsequently, a second opinion, on the par-5 9th at Albany Golf Club.

The players were playing lift-clean-and-place, and Thomas’ ball came to rest about 5o yards short of the green in an area where it was difficult to identify if the ball was sitting in the fairway or the rough. The ball had gathered some mud, so if the rules official had decided that his ball was in fact in the rough, he would have to hit a pretty difficult shot given the condition on his golf ball.

“Basically, what’s going on?” Thomas asked the official.

The official told Thomas that the change of color in the grass was indicative of the change of fairway to rough, and therefore he would have to hit his ball as it lied. Thomas argued that the grass was cut to the same length in both spots, therefore the color didn’t matter.

“But you see, what I’m saying, this is also beat down from the carts, but look at how much longer this is than this,” he said before walking over to the thicker grass. “Like see, this is the same height [where his ball was and the apparent fairway.] I totally see it’s down grain and it’s a totally different color, but … the change of the length of grass is just what kind of confused me.”

After relief was denied by the official, “JT” called for a second opinion. While waiting for another official to show up, Thomas was heard saying to his caddie Jim “Bones” Mackay, ““It’s the same exact length, this is not rough.”

When the second rules official came over, he said: “I can see the cutline right here,” and pointed to the different shades of grass that the other official mentioned.

Thomas accepted the decision.

Interestingly, announcer Paul Azinger shared his opinion that the second rules official almost never will disagree with the first rules official’s ruling.

“That second opinion almost never works,” Azinger said to Dan Hicks during the broadcast.

“Really?” Hicks asked.

“Never,” Azinger said. “Very rarely will an official go against another official.”

More from the 19th Hole

Your Reaction?
  • 0
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK1

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Data shows how much more difficult green become as the day progresses

Published

on

For many a golf bettor, betting on the first round leader of any tournament revolves around the early starters.

Even a cursory look at this week’s Australian Open shows the morning wave averaging 1.73 shots better than the afternoon players, resulting in 18 early starters finishing in the top-10 by the end of the day, including current leader David Micheluzzi.

However, over on the South African Open, the roles are reversed, with current leader Thirston Lawrence taking up one of 15 places on the front page of leaderboard for the late starters, who shot around half-a-shot less than the morning groups.

Naturally, there are many factors – wind, temperature, dew, grass-types and, potentially, overall quality of the groupings, but these are variables that can change from day to day.

Step in Lou Stagner, data lead of Arccos Golf and all-round numbers guru.

Stagner does not deal in emotion or factors that cannot be measured. It’s facts, figures and that’s your lot!

He will tell you that from the fairway, 80-yards from the pin, professionals simply don’t get as close as many believe:

On Wednesday, the man who once built a Lego model of Augusta #12, tweeted a table showing the variance in putts made by PGA Tour members under morning and afternoon conditions.

Taking stats over 17 years, the table shows an advantage to the early starters, not by much, but enough to consider.

There are plenty of places to take the stats, with a few respondents asking for a table on grass types through the day – Bent v Bermuda v POA – and that will probably turn up on Stanger’s twitter feed soon.

Of course, on a Sunday, later starters have the pressure of trying to win a tournament, which is why we tend to see flashy rounds from those a few off the pace on Payday, but it is enough to consider when trying to get that illusive three-figure first (or second) round leader.

Either way, two-time major champion, and regular tweeter Justin Thomas, decided this was his chance to get in an early excuse when he’s off late in the day.

Make of what you will. Perhaps the stats will one day include how many of these are for par saves against birdie putts, or is that too much?

Either way, Stagner continues to bombard us with stats that delight and entertain, and that can be no bad thing. Unless you are a buddy of Lou’s…

More from the 19th Hole

Your Reaction?
  • 1
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK1

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Cam Smith fumes at ‘pretty s****y’ opening round at Australian Open

Published

on

After an incredible week at the Fortinet Australian PGA Championship, Cameron Smith is off to a rough start at the Australian Open. The Champion Golfer of the Year struggled to hit fairways all day long and finished his round at +1 which is eight shots back of first-round leader David Micheluzzi (-7).

Smith, who received a massive ovation from the crowd, was extremely displeased, calling his play “pretty shitty” as he went from his post-round press conference to the practice range. The 29-year-old also said it was “as bad as I’ve played in a long time”.

“I don’t think it was a mixed bag, I think it was all rubbish to be honest,”

“Maybe some delayed tiredness, maybe. I did feel a little bit foggy out there at times, but it’s not really an excuse, it’s my job to do all that stuff.”

Despite the uninspiring round, the world number three still feels as if he can get back into the event and contend.

“It’s not like I don’t know how to play golf, it was just a bit of a bad day.”

“I’ve just got a few things to clean up, I think. Like I said last week [at the Australian PGA Championship], I felt as though the golf got better every day.”

The Aussie is incredible at recovery shots and finding his way out of trouble. But if he wants to be the first player to win the Australian PGA and Australian Open in the same season since 2011, he needs to start putting the ball in the fairway.

More from the 19th Hole

Your Reaction?
  • 3
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL1
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

WITB

Facebook

Trending