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2022 Farmers Insurance Open outright betting selections

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The PGA Tour season ramps up this week as we head to historic Torrey Pines Golf Club for the 2022 Farmers Insurance Open.

I personally consider this event the true start of the PGA Tour season as it draws big names, a loaded prize pool, and a difficult test; something many golf fans have been craving.

Torrey Pines Golf Club (South) is a Par 72 measuring 7,569 yards. Golfers will play three rounds on the South Course and one round on the North Course.

The South Course is the far more difficult of the two and features Poa annua greens. The North Course is 7,258 yards and features Bentgrass greens.

The 2022 Farmers Insurance Open field is a full-field event comprised of 156 golfers. The field is very strong and will include Jon Rahm, Dustin Johnson, Xander Schauffele, Brooks Koepka, Justin Thomas, Bryson DeChambeau, and Tony Finau.

2022 Farmers Insurance Open Outright Bets

Bryson DeChambeau (+2200)(DraftKings)

When evaluating an odds board, there are a handful of golfers who I believe need to be bet on when they eclipse the +2000 threshold. DeChambeau is one of those golfers. With eight PGA Tour victories on his resume, there are very few golfers on Tour who carry the same amount of win equity as the mercurial 28-year-old. 

Despite two missed cuts in his only two starts at The Farmers Insurance Open, I still believe Torrey Pines is a good course fit for Bryson. It is a long and classical golf course, and he’s had plenty of success on similar tracks throughout his career. Growing up in California, Bryson has established himself as one of the best west coast poana putters on Tour, with four of his professional wins coming on the putting surface. He may not have the results at Torrey Pines, but he has had great recent success in California. He had some strong finishes at Riviera Country Club (5th in 2020, 15th in 2019) and finished 4th at the 2020 PGA Championship at TPC Harding Park (San Francisco). Not to be forgotten, DeChambeau was also involved at the 2021 U.S. Open at Torrey Pines before collapsing down the stretch. 

Bryson has the distance off of the tee and underrated short game and putting to tame Torrey Pines. 

Tony Finau (+2800) (Bet365):

Despite the mediocre performance last week, there is little doubt that Tony Finau plays his best golf during the PGA Tour’s California swing. In 2021, Finau finished 4th, 2nd, 2nd in at American Express, Farmers, and Genesis exemplifying his California prowess. At Torrey Pines specifically, the 32-year-old has arguably the most impressive course history of anyone in the field. In his past five starts at the event his finishes are: 4th, 6th, 13th, 6th, 2nd.

Finau would be the first to tell you that he expects better of himself at PGA West, but the start last week wasn’t all bad. Statistically, he played relatively well gaining 2.8 strokes on approach in two rounds. Torrey Pines is a better fit for Finau’s skill set. He can let it rip off the tee and take advantage of a long golf course that many other players in the field don’t have the firepower for.

There were questions in the past about whether or not Finau could actually win a golf tournament but his victory at The Northern Trust should put those whispers to rest. He is capable of getting it done and this is the spot on the schedule where a win is most likely.

Matthew Wolff (+6600) (Bet365):

When a golfer comes off of a missed cut in an event in which he was a popular player, oftentimes we see a “missed cut discount” the following week. I believe we are getting a good opportunity to buy low on Matthew Wolff this week. It’s no secret that the 22-year-old is extremely volatile, and with volatile players come missed cuts. However, I also believe there is a good deal of win equity in Wolff. He has proven in strong fields that he can compete with the best in the world and rise to the occasion. 

While missed cuts are often a sign of a golfer being in poor form, the same rules haven’t necessarily applied to Wolff throughout the early stages of his career. In 2019, the former Oklahoma State standout missed the cut at the Rocket Mortgage Classic and went on to earn his first PGA Tour victory the following week at the 3M Open. Similarly in 2020, Wolff missed the cut at the Travelers Championship, and responded the next week by coming in second place at the Rocket Mortgage Classic. 

Plenty of golfers show a run of good form before breaking through for a PGA Tour win, but Matthew Wolff isn’t one of them. 

Francesco Molinari (+10000) (Bet365):

Less than two years ago, Francesco Molinari was widely regarded as one of the best golfers on the planet. Since then, the Italian has been on a steep downward trajectory. Since his collapse on the back nine at Augusta, he has only four top ten’s on the PGA Tour. Perhaps not coincidentally, all four of those top ten’s have taken place in the state of California. 

Last season, Molinari had a brief span of a month when he was playing great golf akin to the Molinari of 2019. That stretch started at The American Express and ended at The Genesis. Three of the four events in that span ended with a top ten (8,10,8). After finishing in sixth place last week at The American Express, it would seem that history may be repeating itself. The 39-year-old finished in sixth place and looked exceptional doing it. He gained 4.7 strokes from tee to green in the two measured rounds at PGA West Stadium Course, including 2.2 on approach. 

If by chance, the elite version of Francesco Molinari is back, this is a very small price to pay for the opportunity to buy back in.

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  1. Pingback: 2022 Dubai Desert Classic betting selections: Thomas Pieters tipped to go back-to-back – GolfWRX

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TG2: Shooting Tiger Woods’ Clubs with Greg Moore, Legendary GolfWRX PGA Tour Photographer

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Greg Moore is the man who provides you with all the WITB photos from the PGA Tour on GolfWRX. He shares some stories about handling Tiger’s clubs and his relationship with Joe LaCava. He lets us in on who is the hardest to photograph and shooting prototype gear on Tour.

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Club Junkie: Building a Tiger 3-iron and the most comfortable golf shoes I have ever worn!

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Tiger’s new 3-iron is a P770 head with a Dynamic Gold Mid shaft! I have a P770 head laying around so I decided to build it up with a different shaft, but I was inspired by Tiger! Walk through a few clubs that are going into the bag this week for league. And finally review of what might be the most comfortable shoes in golf, The Asics Gel-Kayano Ace!

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The Wedge Guy: Do irons really need to go longer?

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At Edison Golf, we put high emphasis on getting the right lofts in our customers bags to deliver precision distance gapping where distance control matters most – in prime scoring range. Our proprietary WedgeFit® Scoring Range Analysis helps us get there, and one of the key questions we ask is the loft of your current 9-iron and pitching wedge.

Please understand I have been collecting this type of data from wedge-fitting profiles for over 20 years, and now have seen over 60,000 of these. What’s interesting is to watch the evolution of the answers to those two questions. Twenty years ago, for example, the 9-iron and PW lofts would typically be around 42-43 degrees and 46-47 degrees, respectively. By 2010, those lofts had migrated downward to 40-41 degrees for the 9-iron and 44-45 for the “P-club”. (I began to call it that, because it’s just not a true “wedge” at that low of a loft.)

But how far are the irons makers going to take that lunacy? I see WedgeFit profiles now with “P-clubs” as low as 42-43 degrees and 9-irons five degrees less than that – 37-38 degrees. The big companies are getting there by incorporating mid-iron technologies – i.e. fast faces, multi-material, ultra-low CG, etc. – into the clubs where precision distance control is imperative.

Fans, you just cannot get precision distance control with those technologies.

But the real problem is that golfers aren’t being told this is what’s happening, so they are still wanting to buy “gap wedges” of 50-52 degrees, and that is leaving a huge distance gap in prime scoring range for most golfers.

So, to get to the title of this post, “Do Irons Really Need To Go Longer?” let’s explore the truth for most golfers.

Your new set of irons features these technologies and the jacked-up lofts that go with them, so now your “P-club” flies 125-130 instead of the 115-120 it used to go (or whatever your personal numbers are). But your 50- to 52-degree gap wedge still goes 95-100, so you just lost a club in prime scoring range. How is that going to help your scores?

Please understand I’m not trying to talk anyone out of a new set of irons, but I strongly urge you to understand the lofts and lengths of those new irons and make sure the fitter or store lets you hit the 9-iron and “P-club” on the launch monitor, as well as the 7-iron demo. That way you can see what impact those irons are going to have on your prime scoring range gapping.

But here’s something that also needs to get your close attention. In many of the new big-brand line-ups, the companies also offer their “tour” or “pro” model . . . and they are usually at least two degrees weaker and ¼ to 3/8 inch shorter than the “game improvement” models you are considering.

But really, how much sense does that make? The tour player, who’s bigger and stronger than you, plays irons that are shorter and easier to control than the model they are selling you. Hmm.

It’s kind of like drivers actually. On Iron Byron, the 46” driver goes further than the 45, so that’s what the stores are full of. But tour bags are full of drivers shorter than that 46-inch “standard”. So, if the tour player only hits 55-60% of his fairways with a 45” driver, how many are you going to hit with a 46?

I’m just sayin…

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