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Blade vs cavity back style wedges – GolfWRXers discuss

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In our forums, our members have been discussing wedge style preferences. WRXer ‘Jjfcpa’ is curious to see what style is used by the majority of members and why, and WRXers have been sharing their thoughts on both types.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • cwik: “I play blade wedges personally. I don’t see any benefit from CB style wedges around the green or on partial wedge shots. I guess they could provide some help on full swing mis-hits, but I’ve never seen an improvement in overall scores when playing CB’s throughout the bag. The addition of CB wedges is unlikely to produce any scoring benefits for me over time as well.”
  • aaronpoling: “I played SM7’s, then went to MD 4’s, and have settled on CBX 2’s. I play G25’s so going with a CB wedge made sense to me. Both the SM7’s and MD 4’s were great feeling, but I needed something more forgiving, and while they don’t feel as great as the other, they are good!”
  • cactusgolf: “I can shank, thin, or fat any wedge. I’m just that good. I’ve played both CB wedges (CBX-type) and now my Callaway MD3s since they came out. I really haven’t noticed a noticeable benefit to playing one over the other as long as the bounce is right for the type of course and how I deliver the club to the ball.”
  • texas_tom: “I was just looking into this. I settled on a 50 degree GW CBX2 for pitch shots and bump and run and heavy grass. I have Vokey 54/58 for the “finesse” Lob and high soft shots. Of course, I blade the crap out of most of those, so I use my cbx more and more. I think the CBX has a higher swingweight? It definitely feels like it, I don’t feel as flippy with it.”

Entire Thread: “Blade vs cavity back style wedges”

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Gianni is the Assistant Editor at GolfWRX. He can be contacted at [email protected] Follow him on Twitter @giannimosquito

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Drkviol801

    Jul 20, 2021 at 7:34 am

    The Ping wedges remain the most underrated , hydropearl finish makes ball spin unlike any other.

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Whats in the Bag

Viktor Hovland’s winning WITB: 2021 Hero World Challenge

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  • Viktor Hovland what’s in the bag accurate as of the Hero World Challenge. 

Driver: Ping G425 LST (9 degrees @8.4)
Shaft: Fujikura Speeder TR 661 TX (45.5 inches, tipped 1/2 inch)

3-wood: TaylorMade SIM (15 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei Blue AV Raw 85 TX

7-wood: Ping G425 Max
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI 8 X

(Photo c/o SMS_on_Tour)

Irons: Ping i210 (4-PW) [Hovland is no longer playing the 3-iron pictured in the photo]
Shafts: KBS Tour V 120 X (4-PW)

Wedges: Ping Glide Forged Pro (50-SS, 56-SS), Titleist Vokey Design SM8 WedgeWorks (60)
Shafts: KBS Tour V 130 X

Putter: Ping PLD DS 72

Ball: Titleist Pro V1

Grips: Golf Pride MCC

 

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Whats in the Bag

Sam Burns WITB 2021 (December)

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sam burns witb 2021
  • Sam Burns what’s in the bag accurate as of the Sanderson Farms Championship. 

Driver: Callaway Epic Speed (10.5 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Blue 7 TX

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Fairway wood: Callaway Mavrik Sub Zero (17 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Black 8 X

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Hybrid: Callaway Apex UW (21 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Blue 8 X

 

 

 

Irons:Callaway Apex TCB (4-PW)
Shafts: Project X Rifle 6.5

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Wedges: Callaway Jaws MD5 (50-10S, 56-10S @55, 60-12X)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold S400 Tour Issue

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IMG_8194.jpegPutter: Odyssey O-Works Black 7S
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Ball: Callaway Chrome Soft X

Grips: Golf Pride MCC

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Equipment

A guide to buying junior golf equipment

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Junior golf equipment has come a long way in the past ten years. Gone are the days of used adult clubs that were cut down for juniors. It is fine to get a 2, or 3-year-old child started with some simple plastic clubs, but as kids get older, they need a set of golf clubs that are made with their body in mind.

Today there are several manufacturers making clubs specifically for juniors. Even with all these different types of clubs to choose from, there still are a few important things to consider when buying junior clubs. Length is the first consideration. The key is to find a set of clubs that is the right length for the junior golfer but also a set that the junior can grow with. Remember that it is all right for the junior to choke or grip down on the club. You just don’t want them to move their hands down the grip too much.

The basic rule is this: if the junior is choking down more than 1.5 to 2 inches, he or she is choking down too much. If they choke down more than 2 inches, the club is too long, and they may form habits that may be difficult to change. A set of clubs where the junior only has to grip down an inch allows them to make a normal swing at the ball and probably get two seasons out of the clubs.

Try not to let your junior play with a driver that is too long. At some point, they’re going to try and play with an adult driver before they’re ready. A driver that is too long can lead to timing problems and coming into the ball at a flat angle which makes it hard to hit the ball on the center of the face.

The next consideration is shaft flex. The main problem with the old cut-down set of golf clubs is the stiffness of the shafts. When you take 4 to 5 inches of length off a golf club, you make the shaft extremely stiff. This is the reason that junior golfers can’t hit the ball high with a cut-down set of clubs. One benefit of new junior sets is that the manufacturers are making shafts that are the right flex for a kid’s swing speed.

Using lightweight steel and graphite has made junior golf clubs more playable. The shafts of junior clubs today are so flexible that you can bend them with your hands. So check and make sure that your child’s set of clubs has a nice flexible shaft. Does your child need to be professionally fit for clubs? The general rule is that until they are 60 inches tall, they’ll be fine with a set of junior clubs from a good manufacturer.

After they reach 5 feet, experienced junior players really benefit from having each club fit for their game. The weight of the golf club is also very important to junior golfers. If the club is overly heavy, the child will struggle to take the club to the top of the backswing. The struggle to get the club back causes manipulation of the swing that will result in inconsistent shots.

A lighter club will help the junior get the club in the correct position at the top and lead to an easily repeatable swing. Just like with shaft flex, most club companies make junior clubs with lighter heads and shafts. So before you buy, just make sure you check the weight of the club and make sure it fits your junior’s age.

The size of the grip is also important. Grip size for kids is a new thought in the last few years. In the past, clubs were cut down, and any grip that fit the shaft was put on. The problem of oversized grips is the same for kids as adults. If the grip feels like a baseball bat, it’s going to change the swing mechanics.

Look for junior grips on their new set of clubs. If you’re changing grips, ask for junior grips with a core of 0.50. These thinner grips will make a difference in your kid’s game. There are now golf balls made for juniors. Here is the general rule for kids and golf balls. Most juniors swing speed is less than 80 MPH, so they can’t handle a lot of the balls on the market.

US Kids Golf makes two balls for juniors. One for kids with a swing speed less than 70 MPH and another for swing speeds around 90 MPH. These balls offer a softer core and more spin to keep the ball in the air and results in more distance. Other than US Kids, a ladies ball will help a lot of juniors that don’t produce a lot of speed.

Lastly, how many clubs does my kid need? Most experts agree that if a child starts at an early age, 4 or 5 years old, they need two clubs to start… a putter and a pitching wedge. Why a wedge instead of a driver? Because the length of the pitching wedge is short and it’s easy to get in the air. Longer clubs are obviously harder to get airborne and can lead to frustration.

As the junior progresses, add a 7 iron, then a hybrid, and then a 3-wood or driver. Those 5 clubs will get him/her through the first couple of years of golf. Once the junior has enough swing speed to make a noticeable difference in distance between irons, then they need 10 or 12 clubs in the bag. As a general rule, this usually happens around 10 years old for experienced juniors.

As adults, we realize how tough golf can be and how much the right equipment can help our games. By keeping these considerations in mind when buying junior golf equipment, you can help your junior play better golf, and more importantly, have more fun on the golf course.

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