Connect with us

Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: Lessons from Tin Cup

Published

on

I hope you all had an enjoyable Memorial Day weekend and took time to give solemn thanks to those true American heroes who gave all for our freedom over the many years past. We are all so very blessed to live in this great country, and the protectors of those freedoms are the most honored and blessed that have walked among us. We all owe them an unfathomable debt of gratitude.

I finished the weekend with my umpteenth watching of the classic golf movie, “Tin Cup.” I’m sure you all know it well.
So, just for fun, I thought I would extricate from that dramatic human tragedy/comedy some real lessons that we all might learn from this tale of Roy McAvoy, Texas driving range pro who achieves immortality of sorts by contending in his first U.S. Open and making the most mystical 12 on the final hole, which cost him the victory but secured his place in U.S. Open history. Or did it?

So here are my favorite takeaways from “Tin Cup”

  1. The value of true friendships. Throughout the movie, Roy’s friends are behind him, beside him and with him, not the least of which is his best friend and caddy, Romeo. When all the world seems against you, it is your true friends who support you and hold you up, giving you strength and resolve to fight through your “demons”, whether that be a case of the shanks, like Roy faced, or any other challenging times in your life. We should all frequently stop and thank our truest friends and supporters for being there for us.
  2. There’s always a way to succeed. When Roy loses it at the regional qualifier and breaks all his clubs – except for his trusty 7-iron – he finds a way to get it home with only that one club. Of course, I would never recommend that drastic a measure, but the point is that when the chips are down – whether on the golf course or in life – it is wise to fall back on that old adage, “dance with who brung you”. When faced with difficulty, find an “old reliable” to fall back on. On the golf course it might mean going to your 3-wood on a bad driving day, or hitting bump and runs when your wedge play is sketchy. But in life, that might mean your spouse, a best friend, parent or sibling. There’s always a way.
  3. It’s all about the challenge…and having fun. A particularly funny scene is when Roy chooses to hit a bank shot off the portable toilet, rather than take a safe shot chipping out to the fairway. None of us are playing for the U.S. Open, so why not let go once in a while and try something crazy — just for FUN!
  4. Go for it! Roy came to the final hole with a chance to win the U.S. Open, but he chose to pursue his own even higher challenge – reaching the final green in two shots to set a U.S. Open scoring record. You all remember that final scene, where he dunks ball after ball into the pond fronting the green, before coming to the last ball in his bag. And with that one, he holes out for the most spectacular 12 in U.S. Open history.

Of course, this movie is all complete fiction, and we who know this game realize that the odds against something like that ever happening are astronomically high. But the movie is great fun, not serious at all, and completely entertaining.
And isn’t that what golf is supposed to be? FUN! And entertaining. And challenging. Aand rewarding, by the flashes of brilliance we all get to experience — BUT ONLY IF WE “GO FOR IT!”

Your Reaction?
  • 88
  • LEGIT10
  • WOW12
  • LOL5
  • IDHT3
  • FLOP5
  • OB2
  • SHANK19

Terry Koehler is a fourth generation Texan, a native of a small South Texas town and a graduate of Texas A&M University. He has had a most interesting 40-year career in the golf industry. He has created five start-up companies, ranging from advertising agencies to golf equipment companies. You might remember Reid Lockhart, EIDOLON, SCOR, or his leadership of the reintroduction of Ben Hogan to the golf equipment industry in 2014. For almost 25 years, his wedge designs have stimulated other companies to slightly raise the CG and improve wedge performance. He has just announced the formation of Edison Golf Company and the new Edison Forged wedges, which have been robotically proven to significantly raise the bar for wedge performance. Terry serves as Chairman and Director of Innovation for Edison Golf, which can be seen at www.EdisonWedges.com. Terry has been a prolific equipment designer of over 100 putters and several irons, but many know Koehler as simply “The Wedge Guy”, as he authored over 700 articles on his blog by that name from 2003-2010.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Club Junkie

Club Junkie: Cobra King Tech hybrid and Baddazz Driver Shaft Review

Published

on

Cobra’s new King Tech hybrid is a great option for just about any player. The adjustable hosel and weights should make this a great club for slicers or players who fight the hook. Baddazz shafts is a new company that is offering aftermarket performance for smaller budgets. The 70x is mid/low launch and very consistent.

 

 

Your Reaction?
  • 3
  • LEGIT1
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: Learning from the (LPGA) pros

Published

on

I’ve written recently about how you can learn from watching the pro game on TV on weekends, but that the lessons are mostly about the importance of the short game. It’s just a fact that these best male players in the world are simply magical around and on the greens, and they have to be to shoot those scores. Tour stats prove that they really do not take these golf courses apart from tee to green if given a tough track.

But apart from that, I believe it’s pretty difficult for the typical recreational golfer – especially those in their 50s or older – to learn much about the golf swing from these finely-tuned athletes who go at it as hard as they do.

As a complete contrast to the men’s professional game, I hope many of you tuned in to watch the amazing play of the LPGA stars at this past weekend’s Women’s PGA Championship. Particularly impressive was the play of both Lizette Salas and Nelly Korda as they distanced themselves from the field the last two days. They went pretty much head-to-head and shot-to-shot until Miss Korda eagled two par 5s to pull away on Sunday with spectacular shotmaking.

What was most impressive to me — and a great contrast to the show the guys on PGA Tour present each week — was the absolute precision of these ladies’ shotmaking with every club through the bag. Overall, their misses tend to be much smaller than the men’s, and their best shots are every bit as good. If you watched, you witnessed drive after drive in the fairway, approach after approach on the green, and many shots – not only with wedges – that just covered the hole. These ladies are really THAT good, trust me.

I’ve always believed that most of us guys can learn a lot more from watching the ladies than the men. They swing with precision and grace, perfect timing and sequencing, in order to get the most out of their physical size and strength, which is a fraction of the typical PGA professional. Lizette Salas, for example was averaging about 230-235 off the tee, usually leaving her 20-30 yards or more behind Korda, but she continually put her hybrid and mid-iron approaches on the green. And she obviously hit a bunch of them close, as she finished 16 under par on a challenging Atlanta Athletic Club course that has also hosted the men on the PGA Tour.

I’m sure Lizette Salas’ distances through her bag are much closer to most of ours than even the shortest hitters on the PGA Tour. And that just proves that precision shotmaking can still allow you to score any golf course. Of course, these ladies also show us time and again that their short games and putting are not inferior to the men at all.

One of the other things that struck me about watching the ladies play the game is how often the cameras catch so many of them smiling – even after shots or holes when the outcome is not to their liking. In other words, they appear to be having fun. And isn’t that what golf is supposed to be about?

An interesting side story to this LPGA major was the fact that PGA Tour player Bubba Watson had reached out to Nelly Korda to encourage her to keep golf in perspective, even offering to be her mental coach. Bubba’s struggles with the mental side of golf are well-documented, and it was super-generous and kind for him to offer to help. Even when you play the game for a living, Bubba extolled, golf still IS NOT LIFE. It’s not nearly as important as faith and family, Bubba coached. And what happens on the course does not determine WHO you are, or your REAL WORTH as a person.

That’s a lesson we can all take to heart.

Yes, I think we all can learn from watching golf on TV, but please don’t discount the quality of talent and skill on the LPGA Tour — these ladies put on a helluva show.

Your Reaction?
  • 163
  • LEGIT18
  • WOW8
  • LOL1
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB0
  • SHANK3

Continue Reading

Golf's Perfect Imperfections

Golf’s Perfect Imperfections: When the competition level raises around you…opportunity knocks!

Published

on

In this episode, we analyze the two types of swingers in golf which are hitters and swingers. We also reflect how good competitors learn to raise their performance when they are in the presence of someone who exemplifies excellence in the practice or their execution.

Your Reaction?
  • 0
  • LEGIT1
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

WITB

Facebook

Trending