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19th Hole

A history of the prize money at the Masters

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While we often cite the green jacket when we think of Augusta National and the Masters tournament, the prize money is certainly not to be sniffed at either.

In fact, over the past few years, the prize money has been growing and growing, and there is now only one major championship, which holds the accolade of possessing a larger prize purse than the year’s opening major.

How much does the winner of the Masters receive?

Dustin Johnson, Tiger Woods 2020 Masters

Dustin Johnson took home $2.07 million when he won the 2020 Masters

In 2020, Dustin Johnson’s victory at Augusta earned the 36-year-old a payday of $2,070,000. It was the second successive year where the winner received a winner’s check worth $2,070,000, after the total prize money at the event saw a $500,000 increase from 2018 to 2019 and 2020, meaning the total prize money available at the event in 2019 and 2020 was $11.5 million.

As of right now, it is unknown whether the prize money for the 2021 Masters will remain at $11.5 million or increase.

How does the prize money at the Masters compare to other majors?

Augusta National

The Masters currently has the second-highest payout of all the majors

The Masters may hold the accolade of being the most prestigious major these days, but it does trail the U.S. Open in prize money. 

The U.S. Open currently has a prize purse of $12.5 million, compared to the Masters’ pool of $11.5 million. In 2020, Bryson DeChambeau took home a winner’s check for $2.25 million after his victory at Winged Foot.

Total Prize Money: 2020 Majors

  • U.S. Open: $12.5 million
  • The Masters: $11.5 million
  • PGA Championship: $11 million
  • The Open (2019): $10.75

Winner’s Check: 2020 Majors

  • U.S. Open: $2.25 million
  • The Masters: $2.07 million
  • PGA Championship: $1.98 million
  • The Open (2019): $1.935

Masters winner payouts through the years

The winner’s check at the Masters has increased approx. 50 percent since 2013

The prize money at the Masters has increased dramatically over the years and even steadily in recent years. Compared to 2013, the total prize purse and the winner’s prize money have seen an increase of around 50 percent.

Check out the winner’s prize money from every Masters tournament below.

  • 1934: $1,500
  • 1935: $1,500
  • 1936: $1,500
  • 1937: $1,500
  • 1938: $1,500
  • 1939: $1,500
  • 1940: $1,500
  • 1941: $1,500
  • 1942: $1,500
  • 1943: No Masters (WWII)
  • 1944: No Masters (WWII)
  • 1945: No Masters (WWII)
  • 1946: $2,500
  • 1947: $2,500
  • 1948: $2,500
  • 1949: $2,750
  • 1950: $2,400
  • 1951: $3,000
  • 1952: $4,000
  • 1953: $4,000
  • 1954: $5,000
  • 1955: $5,000
  • 1956: $6,000
  • 1957: $8,750
  • 1958: $11,250
  • 1959: $15,000
  • 1960: $17,500
  • 1961: $20,000
  • 1962: $20,000
  • 1963: $20,000
  • 1964: $20,000
  • 1965: $20,000
  • 1966: $20,000
  • 1967: $20,000
  • 1968: $20,000
  • 1969: $20,000
  • 1970: $25,000
  • 1971: $25,000
  • 1972: $25,000
  • 1973: $30,000
  • 1974: $35,000
  • 1975: $40,000
  • 1976: $40,000
  • 1977: $40,000
  • 1978: $45,000
  • 1979: $50,000
  • 1980: $55,000
  • 1981: $60,000
  • 1982: $64,000
  • 1983: $90,000
  • 1984: $108,000
  • 1985: $126,000
  • 1986: $144,000
  • 1987: $162,000
  • 1988: $183,800
  • 1989: $200,000
  • 1990: $225,000
  • 1991: $243,000
  • 1992: $270,000
  • 1993: $306,000
  • 1994: $360,000
  • 1995: $396,000
  • 1996: $450,000
  • 1997: $486,000
  • 1998: $576,000
  • 1999: $720,000
  • 2000: $828,000
  • 2001: $1,008,000
  • 2002: $1,008,000
  • 2003: $1,080,000
  • 2004: $1,117,000
  • 2005: $1,260,000
  • 2006: $1,260,000
  • 2007: $1,305,000
  • 2008: $1,350,000
  • 2009: $1,350,000
  • 2010: $1,350,000
  • 2011: $1,440,000
  • 2012: $1,440,000
  • 2013: $1,440,000
  • 2014: $1,620,000
  • 2015: $1,800,000
  • 2016: $1,800,000
  • 2017: $1,980,000
  • 2018: $1,980,000
  • 2019: $2,070,000
  • 2020: $2,070,000

The top 10 earners in the history of the Masters

Tiger Woods has won the most money in the history of the Masters tournament

Tiger Woods, unsurprisingly, has won the most money in Masters tournament history, with his old foe turned friend Phil Mickelson sitting behind him in second place.

Dustin Johnson’s victory at the 2020 Masters sprung him up to fourth place in the top earner’s list at Augusta National, while Justin Rose and Lee Westwood are the two men who crack the top-10 list without ever having donned the green jacket.

  • 1. Tiger Woods: $9,556,069
  • 2. Phil Mickelson: $8,067,517
  • 3. Jordan Spieth: $4,594,828
  • 4. Dustin Johnson: $4,246,475
  • 5. Bubba Watson: $3,968,305
  • 6. Justin Rose: $3,738,015
  • 7. Adam Scott: $3,710,527
  • 8. Angel Cabrera: $3,527,257
  • 9. Lee Westwood: $3,450,930
  • 10. Sergio Garcia: $3,278,530

 

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Gianni is the Assistant Editor at GolfWRX. He can be contacted at [email protected] Follow him on Twitter @giannimosquito

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Paulo

    Jan 11, 2021 at 1:34 am

    Can you adjust the historical winnings for inflation ? Would give a more meaningful comparison

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19th Hole

Tiger Woods receives outpouring of support following car accident

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Following Tuesday’s accident which has left Tiger Woods currently recovering from major surgery, support and well wishes have been pouring in for the 15-time major champion.

Per a statement from Tiger’s official social media account, Woods suffered “comminuted open fractures” affecting both the upper and lower portions of his tibia and fibula in his right leg from the crash, as well as damage to the ankle bones and trauma to the muscle and soft-tissue of the leg.

The statement also communicates that Woods is “awake, responsive and recovering in a hospital room”.

In response to Tiger’s accident, a mammoth amount of support has rolled in from A-list stars, members of other sports and fellow tour pros for Woods. Here’s a look at some of the well wishes:

 

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19th Hole

Tony Finau’s short driver backswing – Would he be the longest on tour by a distance if he wanted? 

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In our forums, our members have been discussing the driver distance Tony Finau generates with his short backswing. WRXer ‘TIScape’ posted a photo of Finau on 18 at Riviera at the top of his backswing from Sunday (above) and says:

“It amazes me how far Tony hits driver with his short backswing. This is a still from a video of his drive at 18 on Sunday at Riviera. Captured at the very top of his backswing. It’s almost as if he’s laying up with driver, and he still averages 306 yards! The clubhead speed he generates with that short swing is astonishing.”

Back in July, Finau showcased his fully extended driver swing in a practice round. The result? 206mph ball speed and a ridiculous 383-yard carry.

Check out the video below.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Tony Finau (@tonyfinaugolf)

Our members have been discussing both his current driver swing and whether Finau could be comfortably the longest on tour if he wanted.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • chipa: “His swing is fun to watch. One thing I have noticed about a lot of big hitters is the forward hand position like Finau’s and then turning the left hand over immediately during the takeaway. DJ Johnson, John Daly, Mike Austin and quite a few long drivers use(d) this technique. I use it when I’m swinging my best and hope to have it mastered sometime soon. I have tried everything like the one piece takeaway, but I just can’t make it work and feel relaxed too.”
  • bscinstnct: “Man, if Tony could just get a little more confidence on Sunday with his putter. He’d basically be DJ. Just want to see him play his best a few times; he’d really light it up.”
  • mosesgolf: “TF said in an interview that he can easily attain 190plus ball speeds but won’t go there due to consistency and accuracy issues. Plus, it’s an avenue for injury to swing that hard.”
  • cardoustie: “Longest on tour if he wanted to be.”

Entire Thread: “Tony Finau’s short driver back swing – Would he be the longest on tour by a distance if he wanted?”

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19th Hole

This astonishing Tiger Woods stat sums up his greatness and perseverance since 2012

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There are countless achievements from Tiger Woods that will be talked about for years to come, and we can now add another to the list thanks to Brandel Chamblee.

The golf analyst took to Twitter on Monday, where he produced one of the most stunning Tiger Woods stats imagineable, which covers the tumultuous period of his career since 2012.

During this period, Woods reclaimed the number one ranking, endured 5 back surgeries, suffered from the chipping yips, an inability to practice, had a humiliating DUI and dropped to 1,199th in the Official World Golf Rankings before rising again.

Despite everything, as Chamblee posted on Monday, Woods has a better win % on Tour than the likes of Dustin Johnson and Brooks Koepka, with only Rory McIlroy having a marginally better win return since 2012.

There were some sceptics that the high win % was down to Tiger appearing so sparingly over the past few years. However, golf fans were quick to correctly point out that the 45-year-old continuously appears at the biggest events with the strongest fields, which makes the 11.7 win % over that period even more impressive.

Never, ever, write off Tiger.

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