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19th Hole

A history of the prize money at the Masters

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While we often cite the green jacket when we think of Augusta National and the Masters tournament, the prize money is certainly not to be sniffed at either.

In fact, over the past few years, the prize money has been growing and growing, and there is now only one major championship, which holds the accolade of possessing a larger prize purse than the year’s opening major.

How much does the winner of the Masters receive?

Dustin Johnson, Tiger Woods 2020 Masters

Dustin Johnson took home $2.07 million when he won the 2020 Masters

In 2020, Dustin Johnson’s victory at Augusta earned the 36-year-old a payday of $2,070,000. It was the second successive year where the winner received a winner’s check worth $2,070,000, after the total prize money at the event saw a $500,000 increase from 2018 to 2019 and 2020, meaning the total prize money available at the event in 2019 and 2020 was $11.5 million.

As of right now, it is unknown whether the prize money for the 2021 Masters will remain at $11.5 million or increase.

How does the prize money at the Masters compare to other majors?

Augusta National

The Masters currently has the second-highest payout of all the majors

The Masters may hold the accolade of being the most prestigious major these days, but it does trail the U.S. Open in prize money. 

The U.S. Open currently has a prize purse of $12.5 million, compared to the Masters’ pool of $11.5 million. In 2020, Bryson DeChambeau took home a winner’s check for $2.25 million after his victory at Winged Foot.

Total Prize Money: 2020 Majors

  • U.S. Open: $12.5 million
  • The Masters: $11.5 million
  • PGA Championship: $11 million
  • The Open (2019): $10.75

Winner’s Check: 2020 Majors

  • U.S. Open: $2.25 million
  • The Masters: $2.07 million
  • PGA Championship: $1.98 million
  • The Open (2019): $1.935

Masters winner payouts through the years

The winner’s check at the Masters has increased approx. 50 percent since 2013

The prize money at the Masters has increased dramatically over the years and even steadily in recent years. Compared to 2013, the total prize purse and the winner’s prize money have seen an increase of around 50 percent.

Check out the winner’s prize money from every Masters tournament below.

  • 1934: $1,500
  • 1935: $1,500
  • 1936: $1,500
  • 1937: $1,500
  • 1938: $1,500
  • 1939: $1,500
  • 1940: $1,500
  • 1941: $1,500
  • 1942: $1,500
  • 1943: No Masters (WWII)
  • 1944: No Masters (WWII)
  • 1945: No Masters (WWII)
  • 1946: $2,500
  • 1947: $2,500
  • 1948: $2,500
  • 1949: $2,750
  • 1950: $2,400
  • 1951: $3,000
  • 1952: $4,000
  • 1953: $4,000
  • 1954: $5,000
  • 1955: $5,000
  • 1956: $6,000
  • 1957: $8,750
  • 1958: $11,250
  • 1959: $15,000
  • 1960: $17,500
  • 1961: $20,000
  • 1962: $20,000
  • 1963: $20,000
  • 1964: $20,000
  • 1965: $20,000
  • 1966: $20,000
  • 1967: $20,000
  • 1968: $20,000
  • 1969: $20,000
  • 1970: $25,000
  • 1971: $25,000
  • 1972: $25,000
  • 1973: $30,000
  • 1974: $35,000
  • 1975: $40,000
  • 1976: $40,000
  • 1977: $40,000
  • 1978: $45,000
  • 1979: $50,000
  • 1980: $55,000
  • 1981: $60,000
  • 1982: $64,000
  • 1983: $90,000
  • 1984: $108,000
  • 1985: $126,000
  • 1986: $144,000
  • 1987: $162,000
  • 1988: $183,800
  • 1989: $200,000
  • 1990: $225,000
  • 1991: $243,000
  • 1992: $270,000
  • 1993: $306,000
  • 1994: $360,000
  • 1995: $396,000
  • 1996: $450,000
  • 1997: $486,000
  • 1998: $576,000
  • 1999: $720,000
  • 2000: $828,000
  • 2001: $1,008,000
  • 2002: $1,008,000
  • 2003: $1,080,000
  • 2004: $1,117,000
  • 2005: $1,260,000
  • 2006: $1,260,000
  • 2007: $1,305,000
  • 2008: $1,350,000
  • 2009: $1,350,000
  • 2010: $1,350,000
  • 2011: $1,440,000
  • 2012: $1,440,000
  • 2013: $1,440,000
  • 2014: $1,620,000
  • 2015: $1,800,000
  • 2016: $1,800,000
  • 2017: $1,980,000
  • 2018: $1,980,000
  • 2019: $2,070,000
  • 2020: $2,070,000

The top 10 earners in the history of the Masters

Tiger Woods has won the most money in the history of the Masters tournament

Tiger Woods, unsurprisingly, has won the most money in Masters tournament history, with his old foe turned friend Phil Mickelson sitting behind him in second place.

Dustin Johnson’s victory at the 2020 Masters sprung him up to fourth place in the top earner’s list at Augusta National, while Justin Rose and Lee Westwood are the two men who crack the top-10 list without ever having donned the green jacket.

  • 1. Tiger Woods: $9,556,069
  • 2. Phil Mickelson: $8,067,517
  • 3. Jordan Spieth: $4,594,828
  • 4. Dustin Johnson: $4,246,475
  • 5. Bubba Watson: $3,968,305
  • 6. Justin Rose: $3,738,015
  • 7. Adam Scott: $3,710,527
  • 8. Angel Cabrera: $3,527,257
  • 9. Lee Westwood: $3,450,930
  • 10. Sergio Garcia: $3,278,530

 

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Gianni is the Assistant Editor at GolfWRX. He can be contacted at [email protected] Follow him on Twitter @giannimosquito

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Paulo

    Jan 11, 2021 at 1:34 am

    Can you adjust the historical winnings for inflation ? Would give a more meaningful comparison

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19th Hole

‘Angry Golfers’ – Pro golfers visit anger management in hilarious Euro tour video

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The European Tour has produced many memorable pieces of content over the past couple of years – but they have just outdone themselves with their latest video: ‘Angry Golfers’.

Filmed in Abu Dhabi, the video stars Tommy Fleetwood who hosts a group therapy session for some golfers looking to lose their temper on the course: Matt Wallace, Ian Poulter, Henrik Stenson, Eddie Pepperell, and of course, Tyrrell Hatton.

Check out the funny video below.

Here’s what some of our members have been saying about the video in our forums:

  • Matty01984: “More amazing work from the European Tour social media team!”
  • Frankensteins Monster: “Bloody brilliant.”
  • gators78: “Whatever this strategic partnership/alliance/cuddle buddy deal is between the PGA Tour and the Euro Tour, the PGAT should launch their entire social media staff and use the Euro Tours. Their stuff is just miles better.”

We can only hope we don’t have too long to wait for more great stuff from the Euro Tour content committee!

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19th Hole

The DailyWRX: 1/22/2021

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Old news, but this SUCKS!

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Golf Digest (@golfdigest)

The truth hurts…

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by PGA Memes (@pgamemes)

These are so satisfying…….

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by European Tour (@europeantour)

BC’s hot take………

Samesies…

DM @johnny_wunder

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19th Hole

Tiger’s alarming decrease in clubhead speed before his 5th back surgery

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Tiger Woods’ close friend Notah Begay talked to Golf Channel this week and shared some insightful information on the pain Tiger felt prior to his latest back surgery and just how much the issue was hurting his performance.

Per Begay, one of the first things Tiger was quick to notice at the PNC Championship back in December was the alarming rate in which his clubhead speed had dropped.

Woods had a PGA Tour-best clubhead speed of 129.2 mph in March 2018, but last month that clubhead speed had sunk to 113mph due to the pain he was feeling.

“I had a chance to visit with him and catch up over at the PNC Championship, but one of the things he did bring up was that he noticed that his clubhead speed was creeping down around 113 (mph), and, I’ve known this guy since he was 9 years old, and he might have been over 113 back then. I don’t think he’s ever crept this low.”  

The analyst also revealed that Woods had “some concern” about having a 5th back surgery, and described the “radiating” pain which forced Tiger to go under the knife yet again:

“I talked to him just recently, within the last hour, and he mentioned that there was radiating pain back down the back part of his leg. Anybody that’s ever had disc problems like myself can realize and understand that’s just a very uncomfortable place to be in. 

Any way you can alleviate the pain, in this particular case, through this procedure, is the way to go, especially if you want to try and pursue elite-level performance.”

For his comeback, Begay told viewers that Woods is back hitting balls already and will have Augusta in mind for his return. As for a blueprint for Tiger to add to his 82 PGA Tour wins, Begay believes hot putting weeks will be key.

“He’s fine. I mean, I literally 15 minutes ago exchanged texts with him, and he was hitting golf balls. It’s not like he’s laying in the bed watching reruns of Friends. He’s gotten the pain alleviated. I promise he wasn’t trying to rip his driver out there, but he’s going to let it come back, he’s going to let it heal and we all know that he’s got the event in April circled.

There’s a lot of torque, a lot of stress, and I think he’s just going to have to play a little bit more of a consistent type of tee-to-green game and then just wait for when the putter starts to warm up like we know it can.”

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