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19th Hole

Director of Golf Courses at Winged Foot predicts SCARY winning score for 2020 U.S. Open

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Players have had a reprieve in recent years at the U.S. Open, with five of the last six winners all finishing the tournament under par. However, this week’s host course Winged Foot is famed for its immense difficulty, and golf fans are expecting far higher scores than seen at the last few editions of the tournament.

How much higher the scores will be remains to be seen, but according to the Director of Golf Courses at Winged Foot, Steve Rabideau, the answer is significantly higher.

Speaking to The Journal News, Rabideau has a specific number in mind for this week’s winner, and that’s a frightening 8-over par.

“Plus-8. Plus-8. Plus 8. … That would cap a very difficult summer. And my guys know that’s what I’ve been thinking.”

If 8-over is the winning score at the 2020 U.S. Open, then that would result in the highest winning score at this event since 1963 and would eclipse ‘The Massacre at Winged Foot’ back in 1974 by one stroke.

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Gianni is the Assistant Editor at GolfWRX. He can be contacted at [email protected] Follow him on Twitter @giannimosquito

4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. James

    Sep 14, 2020 at 12:03 pm

    Majors should not be fun. Looking forward to the overpaid entertainers whining.

  2. Speedy

    Sep 14, 2020 at 11:31 am

    Sounds like wrestling promo. Under-par will win.

  3. Michaele

    Sep 14, 2020 at 9:38 am

    After growing up on Quaker Ridge and Winged Foot a few decades ago, I am going to enjoy watching them struggle and look just like the rest of us. I guarantee you they will. Love to see the best humbled by the game. The young guys need this kind of experience to become real champions.

    A.W. Tillinghast was a genius, maybe the GOAT of course design – Winged Foot, Baltustrol, Quaker Ridge, Bethpage Black, Ridgewood – were the best of his incredible portfolio. It’s over 80 years since his last course and almost 100 years since those masterpieces were done. There are other geniuses out there – C.B. McDonald, Seth Raynor, Ross, Mackenzie, Dye for example – but I do not believe anyone in the history of course design has accomplished what Tillginhast did.

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19th Hole

Ian Poulter on how the Europeans have embraced Ryder Cup underdog mentality

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Ahead of next week’s 43rd Ryder Cup matches, Ian Poulter hopped on SiriusXM PGA Tour Radio with Michael Breed to discuss the European team’s chances.

When Breed asked the 12-time European Tour winner about the team’s underdog mentality, Poulter chuckled,

“You know that’s our advantage, I guess, in a way, right? That we have delivered when perhaps we shouldn’t have delivered. And that is the magical question that gets asked all the time. That’s what has the American press scratching their head. That’s what has the American team scratching their heads at times, right? On paper, on paper, on paper, on paper, the U.S. team should have delivered. It’s for us to enjoy and for the American team to figure out, right?”

It’s hard to knock Poulter’s confidence. The European side has won four out of the last five, seven of the last nine, and nine of the last 12 Ryder Cups. Poulter is a six-time Ryder Cup veteran, and the European team is 4-2 when he plays. He holds a lifetime 14-6-2 record, and he has yet to record a loss in Sunday singles.

Nothing about Ian Poulter’s statistical profile jumps out “on paper.” In fact, out of the 24 players competing at Whistling Straits next week, Poulter ranks 21st in data golf’s true strokes gained metric over the last year. With that being said, the U.S. team always has the advantage “on paper,” and that appears to be just the way the Europeans like it.

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19th Hole

Kevin Na: Should have paired me with Bryson at Ryder Cup

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Kevin Na is in action at the PGA Tour’s 2021-22 season opener in Napa this week, fresh off the disappointment of not receiving a Ryder Cup Captain’s pick he felt he might get.

Following an opening round of 3 under par, the American told Golfweek’s Adam Schupak about receiving the bad news from Steve Stricker and explained how he’d have been an ideal partner for Bryson DeChambeau.

“If I had Bryson DeChambeau as my partner hitting driver, I’d be stuffing wedge in there or short irons. I’m a good putter, a good chipper.

“I mean, so all these years you’re telling me that the U.S. team has been struggling because they had lack of length? No, if anything it has been putting, guys able to make putts under the gun. But it’s over.”

Na has been one of the best wedge players and putters consistently over the past few years, and his argument that he could have capitalized on Bryson’s monstrous drives in foursomes action – a format the American side have always struggled with – certainly has plenty of merit.

The 38-year-old looked to have made himself hard not to pick after East Lake, where he had tied the lowest score after four rounds but revealed to Schupak that he felt Stricker had his mind made up before the event.

“It didn’t matter what happened at the Tour Championship. (Stricker) already had his mind set. That’s my personal opinion. I think it would have been great if I played for the team. I think I could have really brought some good energy and I could’ve really contributed and disappointing that I won’t get the chance to do that.”

Safe to say, Na isn’t too pleased with the decision, but he’s ready to work even harder to make the next U.S. team

“It’s a captain’s call. I respect his decision. Do I disagree? Yeah, I disagree. I just have to play better.”

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19th Hole

Phil Mickelson shares theory for Europe’s Ryder Cup success

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For the first time in over 25 years, Phil Mickelson will not be competing for the United States Ryder Cup team. He will, however, be in the team room as an assistant captain to Steve Stricker.

No one is more experienced in the Ryder Cup than the six-time major champion, who holds the record for most appearances with 12. With that being said, the United States only holds a 3-9 record in those last 12 matches.

On the debut episode of 5 Clubs with Gary Williams, Mickelson shared his theory for why the European team has been so dominant. When asked if he had a theory why Team Europe was so much more successful, Mickelson responded with a laugh, “Yes I do.”

The reigning PGA Championship winner elaborated, “I see the way they support each other, and I see the way that they have this foundation of support amongst each other to lift each other up. I see them walking side-by-side in the fairways and with a vision of solidarity, if you will. I see them helping each other get the best out of each other.”

That description falls in stark contrast to the countless instances of drama and chemistry issues surrounding the U.S. side. With that being said, Mickelson does believe the U.S. side is improving in that respect.

Referring to the European’s strategy and team effort, the 45-time PGA Tour winner stated, “I see the U.S. starting to do that. We’ve been doing that, and I think we’re going to start to play some of our best golf in the coming years, I really do.”

The 43rd edition of the Ryder Cup kicks off on Friday, September 24th at Whistling Straits in Haven, Wisconsin.

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