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Don’t do this to your clubs at home! (Part 2)

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At GolfWRX it has always been our goal to help inform, educate, and empower golfers to learn more about their equipment, and in many cases, help them take ownership of the process to work on their own clubs. With just a few basic tools, it’s quite easy to do things like regrip, re-epoxy, or change paintfill, but there are still a lot of jobs that should be left to professionals with the proper tools—for both safety and for the sake of your gear.

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As we covered in part one of this series, there are some ways to customize the finish of your clubs at home, but you should leave stripping chrome up to the professionals. I know it may seem obvious, but based on the number of questions I get on a weekly basis about how to potentially strip chrome plating, I believe it was a great introductory topic.

CHROME PLATING — NORTHWEST CHROME

For part two, we’re going to get into something a little less complicated but still important.

Don’t pull a graphite shaft without the proper tools!

Graphite shaft technology has never been better, and that includes the materials and processes used to manufacture them. Although driver shafts can handle a lot of forces from the golf swing and the impact of the ball, the one thing they can’t handle is too much heat and twisting. Steel shafts, on the other hand, can take the heat and twisting, which is why they are the best place to start for beginner club builders, since all you need to pull a club head is a vice, rubber clamp, and torch.

If you are going to work on graphite-shafted clubs, the most important tool that any hobbyist club builder should have or have access to is a high-quality shaft puller. It’s a necessary tool for anyone who wants to do repairs and helps prevent damage to a shaft while pulling it.

Why a shaft puller is important

A shaft puller only applies linear pressure down the shaft towards the hosel of the club. The more linear pressure that can be applied to the clubhead, the less heat needs to be used to break down the epoxy. When done properly both the shaft and the head are reusable in the future.

And by the way, if you want to know how to pull a graphite shaft, check out my video below.

 

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Ryan Barath is part of the Digital Content Creation Team for GolfWRX. He hosts the "On Spec" Podcast on the GolfWRX Radio Network which focuses on discussing everything golf, including gear, technology, fitting, and course architecture. He is a club-fitter & master club builder with more than 17 years of experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour players. He is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf. He now works independently from his home shop and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, and share his passion for club building, course architecture and wedge grinding.

3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. joro

    May 22, 2020 at 7:23 pm

    I can’t tell you how many came in my shop with the tip like this from trying to take a Graphite shaft out with a torch and twisting it till they ruin it. Most of them do not want to pay the price for a new one so my correction would be to cut off the ruined part, reset it and put a Graphite extender in. Of course that affects the flex a bit, but not that much and of course I would explain it all before doing it. In a Wedge though I don’t think it is that bad because wedges are stiff anyway. If they do want a new one you can save the old and use it for another ruined club. The longer the better. I know some will criticize me but I worked with Several Graphite Companies and club companies and they say most of the shafts are not the same anyway. Callaway once told me all the shafts were basically stiff no mater what the label said. It is not that precise.

  2. Benny

    May 21, 2020 at 1:21 pm

    Well said and agree. I just about ruined a set of Steelfiber Player Spec shafts. Super rare and expensive.

    Completely ruined Recoil wedge shafts.

  3. stanley

    May 21, 2020 at 10:35 am

    love these series. I am trying to get into a little bit of club builing. thanks for the info.

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Equipment

Precision Pro Golf launches new R1 Smart Rangefinder

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Precision Pro Golf has launched its new R1 Smart Rangefinder, which is available for pre-order today at www.precisionprogolf.com.

Billed as the company’s most-advanced model to date, the R1 Smart Rangefinder features MYSLOPE technology, which is the first-ever personalized slope calculation that creates an adjusted distance specific to a player and their environment.

The patented MYSLOPE algorithm is designed to combine a player’s unique ball data (launch angle, ball speed, spin rate) with environmental variables (temperature, altitude, humidity, etc.) for ultimate accuracy over each shot.

The R1 ($319.99) does not require players to look at or use their phones during a round of golf. Instead, data is seamlessly relayed via Bluetooth from the Precision Pro Golf app (available for iOS and Android) to the unit, where all figures and measurements are displayed through the viewfinder.

Beyond providing actual and MYSLOPE adjusted distances, with a push of a button, the R1 will display yardages to the front, middle and back of the green, with the functions able to quickly disengage for USGA-conforming play via a toggle on the side of the rangefinder.

Speaking on the new addition, Clay Hood, CEO of Precision Pro Golf, said

“Just over seven years ago we started Precision Pro with the goal of bringing budget-friendly rangefinders to the masses; now we are helping golfers in new, innovative ways. The R1 Smart Rangefinder doesn’t just provide distances, it changes the definition of accuracy. It brings a level of insight the everyday golfer has never before had access to.”

As with Precision Pro Golf’s other rangefinders, clarity is achieved through the enhanced LCD display, which provides 6x magnification to help golfers always find their target. Additional features of the R1 rangefinder include:

  • Wind Assist – Lets the golfer know how wind might potentially impact the distance of each shot.
  • Find My Precision Pro – Notifies the golfer when their rangefinder is missing and reminds them to secure it when the round is over.
  • GPS Distances – Slope-adjusted distances to the front, center, and back of the green
  • Target Acquisition Technology – Makes it simple to lock on a target, even with shaky hands.
  • Pulse Vibration – Delivers a short burst to ensure players are shooting the flag and not at another target.
  • Magnetic Cart Grip – Easily sticks to the cart, clubs or any other metal object.

The new R1 Rangefinder costs $319.99 and is available for pre-order now through www.precisonprogolf.com.

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Sergio Garcia re-joins TaylorMade; 2021 PGA Championship WITB

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Two days before the year’s second major, Sergio Garcia has announced that he is re-joining TaylorMade four years after the Spaniard parted ways with the company.

Garcia left TaylorMade for Callaway in a partnership that lasted two years before becoming a free agent until this week.

The new multi-year agreement with TaylorMade will see the 41-year-old use the brand’s clubs, golf ball, staff bag and represent the company with a logo on the side of his hat.

On his social media accounts, Garcia announced the news by saying:

“Excited to re-join TaylorMade Golf. I’ve always been comfortable with their team, their approach to the game and their equipment, especially their TP5X golf ball. Happy to be back.”

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Sergio Garcia (@thesergiogarcia)

Though he is reportedly testing TaylorMade’s SIM2 Max driver and a new Spider Ex putter, Garcia will play the original SIM and a Scotty Cameron flat-stick at Kiawah Island.

Sergio Garcia 2021 PGA Championship WITB

Driver: TaylorMade SIM (9.0 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Black 7 X

3-wood: TaylorMade SIM Rocket 3 (14.5 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Black 7 X

5-wood: TaylorMade SIM (19 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Black 8 X

Irons: TaylorMade P750 (3-PW)
Shaft: Nippon NS Pro Modus 3 Tour 130 X

Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM8 (52), Vokey Wedge Works BV Proto 2020 (58-T)
Shafts: Nippon NS Pro Modus 3 Tour 130 X

Putter: Scotty Cameron Phantom X 11.5

Ball: TaylorMade 2021 TP5x (#85)

 

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Equipment

‘What club/loft do you use inside 100 yards?’ – GolfWRXers discuss

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In our forums, our members have been discussing their choice of club from 100 yards and in. WRXer ‘JCray33’ kicks off the thread, saying:

“I’ve usually used my 60 degree, which is my 100 yard on full swing but doing some research, I’ve heard 60 degree can be inconsistent on the half and 3/4 shots, and I’ve definitely found that to be true! So now I’m hitting my 56 degree (110-115 full) on everything inside of 100…what do y’all play for the feel, inside 100 yard shots??”

And our members have been discussing their strategy in the forums.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Chadwickog: “56 degree from 100 and in typically. All other clubs are full swing clubs unless it’s a specific situation.”
  • Shipwreck: “I practice hitting a variety of distances with each of my wedges. I feel comfortable hitting a variety of shots with each of my clubs based off of either going waist-high, shaft vertical, 3/4 swing and full. I can cover anything from 40 yards to 135 yards with this.”
  • lefthack: “PW from 100 yards to about 50. 52/8 or 56/12 based on lie. Really don’t full swing my wedges.”
  • KevCannon: “Have been using my 54 degree more often for partial swings inside 100yds. It would depend on conditions and pin placement if I need to use 58 degree.”

Entire Thread: “What club/loft do you use inside 100 yards?”

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