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A few thoughts on spectator-less golf tournaments

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I hate to admit it, but I have to be honest. Golf is not a great sport to watch live.

I’m glad I got that off my chest.

The PGA Tour, and other professional tours do the absolute best they can. But here’s the difficulty

  • The players are really spread out. Unless you are a “find a spot and park” kinda fan, trying to watch your favorite player for 18 holes can be tough. It’s a LOT of walking, especially when you consider all of the stopping and crossing back and forth you have to do. They get to walk down the fairways, you do not. Unlike when you show up to an arena with a ticket and know exactly where the action is happening, you can’t get that in golf unless you are around the 18th on Sunday. For casual observers, it’s often hard to “get into the action.”
  • It can be hard to find a place to actually see shots. Unless it’s a TPC, or a course designed with events in mind with stadium mounding, you don’t usually see much—this is why so many people employ the lets park here mentality…but do you really want to watch approach shots all day?
  • It’s often a full-day commitment. When you go to almost any other sporting event, you at least know there is going to be a time limit set for the game (let’s excluded baseball with this one). Golf doesn’t have that, and when you consider being out in the elements all day vs. inside an air-conditioned stadium arena, it once again can make it tough for a lot of fans.

This doesn’t mean I don’t love going to tour events, I actually LOVE it, and obviously, so do a lot of other people, but I have a very different approach than a lot of fans. I generally hit the range and practice area and watch pros go through their routines—its endlessly fascinating, and you never get to see that stuff on TV. I like to follow lesser-known players on the course, which means I actually do get to see a lot of shots since it’s not crowded—not to sound like a golf hipster, but following a marquee group is just not my style. Plus, since I, like many of you reading this, am a golf nut, it means I get to hang out with a bunch of like-minded people on a golf course? What could be better than that?

But the initial question still remains, what if there were no fans on the course for tour event? We got to see some of that this past Thursday at Liberty National when, because of weather, fans were delayed and the pros went out without them. It was quite the sight to see, no roars, no “get in the holes” just golfers on a course. It was like we got to peek inside what it would really be like to just watch these golfers play—or how you experience it every time you tee it up. I know I have never had 200 people watching me miss a fairway in long rough, only to have it found in 30 seconds thanks to a search party. Most golfers will never play with a forecaddie, but as pros, they have essentially hundreds of people to help.

By the way, if you have ever wondered what it would be like to watch pros play with no (or at least very few fans) check out a Monday qualifier, or a U.S. Open Sectional—very skilled golfers, up close, with no ropes. It’s a vastly different vibe than what you would see lining the fairways of a tour event. It’s just golfers trying to post their best scores which for serious golf nutters can be a real thrill.

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Ryan Barath is part of the Digital Content Creation Team for GolfWRX. He hosts the "On Spec" Podcast on the GolfWRX Radio Network which focuses on discussing everything golf, including gear, technology, fitting, and course architecture. He is a club-fitter & master club builder with more than 17 years of experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour players. He is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf. He now works independently from his home shop and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, and share his passion for club building, course architecture and wedge grinding.

5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Mike

    Aug 11, 2019 at 9:59 am

    Couldn’t agree more. I’ve had everything from a VIP Major ticket to a standard day pass. I think of ‘live’ golf the way I do gong to the ballpark…go w/ friends, eat, drink, shoot the BS & watch when something exciting is going on. Otherwise, you’re going to stand in the hot sun to watch 2 guys each hit a shot. Then, you’ll wait 12 more minutes for the next 2 guys to do the same thing. That w/b the same pattern for the next 6 hours. I record every golf event (to avoid the endless commercials) except for the Majors (where there are far fewer commercials). Much more enjoyable in the comfort of my home!

    I can give kudos the the LPGA, they really encourage much more fan contact at their events.

  2. Caroline

    Aug 9, 2019 at 11:29 pm

    For anyone into how the pro’s do it this is the only way to really see it done right…just last year I was on a short 390 yard par four and 3,4, irons were hit off the tee a lot maybe 85% after 3 days of watching the pros hit that 240, 260 yard iron shot I came away with one thing for sure “What fore ward shaft lean?

  3. Speedy

    Aug 9, 2019 at 8:38 pm

    Relax, enjoy the tournament. Follow who you like, when you like. Meet people. Enjoy life. Don’t worry about missing golf shots.

  4. TR1PTIK

    Aug 9, 2019 at 1:28 pm

    Went to the 2018 PGA Championship in St. Louis. I don’t think I’ll ever go watch a tournament live again unless I’m fortunate enough to go to the Masters. Like you said, it requires a lot walking and hiking and potentially missing out on some spectacular golf (if you choose to follow a dud for instance). Parking it in one spot is also a poor choice IMO because as you also mentioned, who wants to see the same shot over and over? Golf is much more enjoyable when played or when watching on TV – where you can see a variety of shots from a variety of players while sitting at home.

  5. Acemandrake

    Aug 9, 2019 at 11:52 am

    Follow the first group of the day.

    You’ll beat the crowds, see the entire course, watch good players manage their rounds and be out of there by noon.

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Club Junkie

Club Junkie: Srixon ZX and TaylorMade SIM2 Max fairways and My top 3 drivers!

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Masters hangover week is here! I have had the new Srixon ZX fairway out on the course and it is underrated as you would imagine. Reshafted the SIM2 Max 3w and it has been super consistent and comfortable. Talking about the top 3 drivers I have been hitting this year.

 

 

 

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Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: The importance of a pre-shot routine

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I believe one of the big differences between good amateurs and those who are not-so-good—and between the top professionals and those that can’t quite “get there”—lies in the consistency of their pre-shot routine. I read an interesting account on this subject after the final round of the 1990 Masters when Nick Faldo passed a collapsing Greg Norman. I know that was 30 years ago, but the lesson is just as relevant today.

This particular analyst timed the pre-shot routines of both players during the first three rounds and found that on the final day that Norman got quicker and quicker through his round, while Faldo maintained his same, methodical approach to every shot, not varying by more than a second or so. I think that is pretty insightful stuff.

Anytime you watch professional golf—or the better players at your club—you’ll see precision and consistency in the way they approach all of their shots. There is a lesson there for all of us—so, here are my ideas of how the pre-shot routine should work.

The first thing is to get a good feel for the shot, and by that, I mean a very clear picture in your mind of how it will fly, land, and roll. It is certainly realistic to have a different routine for full shots, chips and pitches, and putts, as they are all very different challenges. As you get closer to the hole, your focus needs to be more on the feel of the shot than the mechanics of the swing, in my opinion.

On any shot, I believe the best starting point is from behind the ball, seeing in your “mind’s eye” the film clip of the shot you are about to hit. See the flight path it will take, and on greenside shots, just how it will roll out. As you do this, you might waggle the club back and forth to get a feel of the club in your hands and take as many practice swings as it takes to “feel” the swing that will produce that visualized shot path for you.

Your actual pre-shot routine can start when you see that shot clearly and begin your approach the ball to set up. From that “trigger point,” you should work hard to do the exact same things, at the exact same pace, each and every time.

This is something that you can and should work on at the range. When you are out there “banging balls,” don’t just practice your swing, but how you approach each shot.

So, guys and ladies, there’s my $.02 on the pre shot routine. What do you have to add?

 

 

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Opinion & Analysis

Ways to Win: Hideki Matsuyama from Low Am to low man at the Masters

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They say the Masters does not start until the back nine on Sunday, but by that time, this year’s iteration was all but wrapped up. Hideki Matsuyama stepped onto the 10th tee with a five-stroke lead and the volatile back nine in front of him. The Augusta pines would be void of roars, though, as Matsuyama’s pursuers near the top of the leaderboard struggled to mount a significant charge. The closest challenger was a late-charging Xander Schauffele, who made four straight birdies to get to within two of the lead heading to the 16th tee. His hopes were then quickly dashed when he dunked his tee shot in the water and eventually made a triple-bogey. Augusta National Golf Club played difficult this spring. Contrary to the record-setting November version, the greens were more brown and firm than typical and required precision. Luckily for Matsuyama, precision has made him one of the elite golfers in the world. He earned this green jacket. He just happened to earn it on Saturday where his 65 was three strokes better than the next-best round. Using V1 Game to analyze his Strokes Gained performance shows Matsuyama gained 6.7 strokes on the average PGA Tour field on Saturday and 4.2 of those were from his iron game.

Matsuyama has always been a premier ball striker and, if anything, poor putting has held him back from winning more. Augusta National is no place for a balky putter and Matsuyama has made some significant strides in that category. While he did not gain strokes on the field in putting this week, he managed to get to average and, with his elite ballstriking, that was enough. Augusta National’s lightning-quick, undulated greens reward a properly-struck shot and punish even the slightest mishit. Matsuyama made 96 feet of putts Saturday (the PGA TOUR average is around 70 feet), including birdie putts of five, 19, 10, four and 10 feet. He also made a six-foot eagle putt on 15. You don’t have to be an elite putter when you have opportunities that close. Good for Matsuyama, because while he filled it up on Saturday, for the week, his putting was sub-standard.

V1 Game breaks down putting performance by distance from the hole, where we can see that Matsuyama lost strokes to the field in all but four distance buckets. He gave significant strokes back to the field from 4-6 feet, 11-15 ft, and 31-50 feet. Matsuyama had four 3-putts on the week, including one on Saturday and one Sunday. That’s progressing in the right direction, but still with room for improvement for the 29-year-old Matsuyama.

If you are going to win the Masters, it always starts with the par 5s and Matsuyama took advantage, playing them in 11-under for the week. He played the par 3s in +1 and the par 4s in even par for the week. Clearly, the par 5s were vital to him being able to get to the required -10 to win the tournament by just a single stroke. Augusta National has arguably the finest set of par fives in golf, each of them scorable and each of them dangerous. With V1 Game’s Hole History, Hideki played the 13th the best at -4 and the 8th the next-best at -3. Hideki made three eagles on the par 5s and averaged 4.3 strokes on the par 5s. That even includes the near-disaster on 15 on Sunday. Matsuyama was consistently in play off the tee and able to challenge the greens with his approach shots throughout the week.

All of the above added up to a healthy lead and afforded Matsuyama some cushion coming down the stretch, cushion that he needed as he got closer to earning his first green jacket. The golf tournament could have turned out significantly differently if young Will Zalatoris could have found a way to play better around Amen Corner, but instead Matsuyama was able to stumble a bit down the stretch and still maintain a two-stroke cushion until the final putt was holed. The Strokes Gained Heatmap from V1 Game for his final round scorecard shows exactly which part of his game became unsteady. Matsuyama overshot the 15th green into the lake and made bogey (Approach). Then three-putted the 16th green and missed a short putt on 18 (putting), knowing bogey was enough to win the golf tournament.

Still, a well-earned victory for Matsuyama. He struck the ball better than anyone else this week and did enough to claim the victory. Augusta National showed its teeth with firmer, faster greens and challenged the field to be precise. Matsuyama has made a career out of being precise. The same strength that brought Hideki Low Amateur honors more than 10 years ago brought him the green jacket as low man in the 2021 Masters.

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