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Why you should consider playing Club Golf in college

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In 2003, college golf changed for the better when the Southeastern Club Golf Association started. The organization sought to provide college students in the southeast an opportunity to participate in organized, competitive golf. The Southeastern Club Golf Association grew to become the National Collegiate Club Golf Association (NCCGA) and is the governing body for club golf nationally. Today, fifteen years later, the NCCGA is a doing amazing things under the umbrella of Nextgengolf. Golf entrepreneurs and Nextgengolf founders Kris Hart, Matt Weinberger, and Mahesh Murthy were the guys behind making this happen. The NCCGA had 30 teams in 2009, and is now represented by 350+ programs including a wide spectrum of universities from Stanford, to the University of Florida, to Black Hills State University. With participation in the 10,000s, Nextgengolf is positioning itself to play a bigger role in the college and junior development scene.

Of the roughly 220,000 high school varsity boys and girls golfers, only about 17,000 will go on to play collegiate varsity golf. “Less than 8 percent of high school golfers will play any level of varsity golf in college,” Kris Hart, CEO of Nextgengolf, explained when describing the vast, pivotal industry segment.    

Club Golf teams play a fall and spring season with over 60 tournaments being offered in the spring of 2018. These tournament allow both individuals, as well as teams, to compete on a regional and national scale. No matter the size of your college or skill level of your game, every college-aged golfer has a place to play and compete. Tournament entry fees are $95 on average per player for a two-day, weekend event at quality course. There are additional membership dues of $400 per team or $60 per individual as well. Teams are comprised of 8 players, with the top 5 scores from each team counting to form a team score.

Of the fall 2017 tournaments, 44 percent of them had an individual winner with a score under par. The lowest winning 36-hole score of the fall was by Ben Harden with a two-round total of 134 (10-under par). The average winning score in the fall of 2017 was 748 for 36 holes, counting 5 players per round. This means that the average score of a player on a winning team was 74.8. The average 5th place team score was 820 (averaging 82 for counting scores).  

For junior golfers and their families, Nextgengolf provides an amazing opportunity to combine academics with competitive golf without having to worry about the recruitment process! Mason Wicks from Illinois State said “Club Golf is the perfect opportunity to play competitive golf in college without having the same time commitment as varsity golf. Through club golf you will meet lifelong friends and enjoy competing against many cool people all across the country.”

Club Golf has really carved out a segment quite complimentary to NCAA varsity golf. Varsity golf will always be the top destination for the top-ranked golfers, but many high school students are beginning to see the benefits of choosing a university for academics, on-campus experience, and club golf as opposed to subjecting themselves to varsity scholarship opportunities at schools they may not otherwise choose to attend.

“We have seen many varsity golfers transfer to bigger schools,” said Matt Weinberger, COO of Nextgengolf. “Ben Harden, the fall 2017 top ranked player, transferred from New Mexico State to Arizona State since he wanted to experience a larger school and was tired of each day being varsity practices and workouts, made a conscious choice that club golf was better suited for him.”

Each year, Club Golf continues to grow and the scores are dropping lower and lower. It wouldn’t be a surprise if we eventually see an elite player who used Club Golf as a path in their long-term development. College coaches are also starting to notice the strength of the players on club teams. Casey Luban of Michigan state said, “”I truly believe that club golf is a wonderful opportunity for players to continue to share their passion for the game and competitive golf outside of the Intercollegiate Athletics environment. I have always believed that in order for the game to continue to grow moving forward, we need to keep as many opportunities as possible out there for those who want to compete. Additionally, our game fosters and promotes relationships that can last a lifetime. I am a huge believer in club golf and I have been impressed by the accomplishments of these fine players.”

When deciding on where to go to college, club golf should be at the forefront versus an afterthought. The NCCGA provides a valuable service allowing anyone at any school to play college golf.

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Brendan is the owner of Golf Placement Services, a boutique business which aims to apply his background in golf and higher education to help educate players, their families and coaches about the process! Website - www.golfplacementservices.com Insta - golf.placement.sevices Twitter @BMRGolf

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Billable Hours

    Feb 15, 2018 at 9:54 am

    Unless you’re winning AJGA or other high level junior events, consider not playing college golf or using golf to get you into school with better academics regardless of whether it’s D1, D2, or D3. Top-tier college golf is a major commitment, and unless you have family money you should focus on academics as opposed to your scoring average.

    It’s difficult to tell this to a kid, but they are most likely not good enough to be on tour and should focus on their careers after golf.

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Club Junkie

Club Junkie: Srixon ZX and TaylorMade SIM2 Max fairways and My top 3 drivers!

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Masters hangover week is here! I have had the new Srixon ZX fairway out on the course and it is underrated as you would imagine. Reshafted the SIM2 Max 3w and it has been super consistent and comfortable. Talking about the top 3 drivers I have been hitting this year.

 

 

 

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Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: The importance of a pre-shot routine

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I believe one of the big differences between good amateurs and those who are not-so-good—and between the top professionals and those that can’t quite “get there”—lies in the consistency of their pre-shot routine. I read an interesting account on this subject after the final round of the 1990 Masters when Nick Faldo passed a collapsing Greg Norman. I know that was 30 years ago, but the lesson is just as relevant today.

This particular analyst timed the pre-shot routines of both players during the first three rounds and found that on the final day that Norman got quicker and quicker through his round, while Faldo maintained his same, methodical approach to every shot, not varying by more than a second or so. I think that is pretty insightful stuff.

Anytime you watch professional golf—or the better players at your club—you’ll see precision and consistency in the way they approach all of their shots. There is a lesson there for all of us—so, here are my ideas of how the pre-shot routine should work.

The first thing is to get a good feel for the shot, and by that, I mean a very clear picture in your mind of how it will fly, land, and roll. It is certainly realistic to have a different routine for full shots, chips and pitches, and putts, as they are all very different challenges. As you get closer to the hole, your focus needs to be more on the feel of the shot than the mechanics of the swing, in my opinion.

On any shot, I believe the best starting point is from behind the ball, seeing in your “mind’s eye” the film clip of the shot you are about to hit. See the flight path it will take, and on greenside shots, just how it will roll out. As you do this, you might waggle the club back and forth to get a feel of the club in your hands and take as many practice swings as it takes to “feel” the swing that will produce that visualized shot path for you.

Your actual pre-shot routine can start when you see that shot clearly and begin your approach the ball to set up. From that “trigger point,” you should work hard to do the exact same things, at the exact same pace, each and every time.

This is something that you can and should work on at the range. When you are out there “banging balls,” don’t just practice your swing, but how you approach each shot.

So, guys and ladies, there’s my $.02 on the pre shot routine. What do you have to add?

 

 

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Opinion & Analysis

Ways to Win: Hideki Matsuyama from Low Am to low man at the Masters

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They say the Masters does not start until the back nine on Sunday, but by that time, this year’s iteration was all but wrapped up. Hideki Matsuyama stepped onto the 10th tee with a five-stroke lead and the volatile back nine in front of him. The Augusta pines would be void of roars, though, as Matsuyama’s pursuers near the top of the leaderboard struggled to mount a significant charge. The closest challenger was a late-charging Xander Schauffele, who made four straight birdies to get to within two of the lead heading to the 16th tee. His hopes were then quickly dashed when he dunked his tee shot in the water and eventually made a triple-bogey. Augusta National Golf Club played difficult this spring. Contrary to the record-setting November version, the greens were more brown and firm than typical and required precision. Luckily for Matsuyama, precision has made him one of the elite golfers in the world. He earned this green jacket. He just happened to earn it on Saturday where his 65 was three strokes better than the next-best round. Using V1 Game to analyze his Strokes Gained performance shows Matsuyama gained 6.7 strokes on the average PGA Tour field on Saturday and 4.2 of those were from his iron game.

Matsuyama has always been a premier ball striker and, if anything, poor putting has held him back from winning more. Augusta National is no place for a balky putter and Matsuyama has made some significant strides in that category. While he did not gain strokes on the field in putting this week, he managed to get to average and, with his elite ballstriking, that was enough. Augusta National’s lightning-quick, undulated greens reward a properly-struck shot and punish even the slightest mishit. Matsuyama made 96 feet of putts Saturday (the PGA TOUR average is around 70 feet), including birdie putts of five, 19, 10, four and 10 feet. He also made a six-foot eagle putt on 15. You don’t have to be an elite putter when you have opportunities that close. Good for Matsuyama, because while he filled it up on Saturday, for the week, his putting was sub-standard.

V1 Game breaks down putting performance by distance from the hole, where we can see that Matsuyama lost strokes to the field in all but four distance buckets. He gave significant strokes back to the field from 4-6 feet, 11-15 ft, and 31-50 feet. Matsuyama had four 3-putts on the week, including one on Saturday and one Sunday. That’s progressing in the right direction, but still with room for improvement for the 29-year-old Matsuyama.

If you are going to win the Masters, it always starts with the par 5s and Matsuyama took advantage, playing them in 11-under for the week. He played the par 3s in +1 and the par 4s in even par for the week. Clearly, the par 5s were vital to him being able to get to the required -10 to win the tournament by just a single stroke. Augusta National has arguably the finest set of par fives in golf, each of them scorable and each of them dangerous. With V1 Game’s Hole History, Hideki played the 13th the best at -4 and the 8th the next-best at -3. Hideki made three eagles on the par 5s and averaged 4.3 strokes on the par 5s. That even includes the near-disaster on 15 on Sunday. Matsuyama was consistently in play off the tee and able to challenge the greens with his approach shots throughout the week.

All of the above added up to a healthy lead and afforded Matsuyama some cushion coming down the stretch, cushion that he needed as he got closer to earning his first green jacket. The golf tournament could have turned out significantly differently if young Will Zalatoris could have found a way to play better around Amen Corner, but instead Matsuyama was able to stumble a bit down the stretch and still maintain a two-stroke cushion until the final putt was holed. The Strokes Gained Heatmap from V1 Game for his final round scorecard shows exactly which part of his game became unsteady. Matsuyama overshot the 15th green into the lake and made bogey (Approach). Then three-putted the 16th green and missed a short putt on 18 (putting), knowing bogey was enough to win the golf tournament.

Still, a well-earned victory for Matsuyama. He struck the ball better than anyone else this week and did enough to claim the victory. Augusta National showed its teeth with firmer, faster greens and challenged the field to be precise. Matsuyama has made a career out of being precise. The same strength that brought Hideki Low Amateur honors more than 10 years ago brought him the green jacket as low man in the 2021 Masters.

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