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The 10 Best Shots In FedEx Cup History

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As the FedEx Cup playoffs head toward their annual climax, let’s have some fun and take a look at some of the most amazing shots in FedEx Cup history. Get your popcorn ready!

10. Phil Mickelson – 2013 Deutsche Bank Championship

This was not his best day or his best tournament (he finished 14 shots back of winner Henrik Stenson), but only Phil can do stuff like this.  It’s basically witchcraft.

9. John Senden – 2009 Deutsche Bank Championship

If you jar a 3-iron for double eagle carrying a hazard from 250 yards out, that deserves to be remembered. Because albatross.

8. Matt Kuchar – 2010 The Barclays

Now we’re getting to the clutch shots.  Kuch had just fired a 66 to get into a playoff with Martin Laird and then comes up with this gem with everything on the line. He would tap in to win the tournament and go on to finish second in the FedEx Cup standings to Jim Furyk that year.

7. Dustin Johnson – 2017 Northern Trust

I’m going to argue that DJ’s much-ballyhooed monster of a drive in a playoff vs. Jordan Spieth is worthy of the No. 7 spot on this list. Fast forward to the 13:05 mark and try to keep your jaw from hitting the floor. To commit to that shot in that situation is something most of us will never be able to truly get our heads around.

6. Jordan Spieth – 2015 Tour Championship

Fast forward to the 1:51 mark for Jordan’s huge putt on the 11th hole of the final round.  Jordan started the day one shot ahead of Stenson. At this point, he was two shots ahead of Henrik, but he was coming off a bogey. Stenson had about a 6-foot putt and Jordan had a 45 footer, so it appeared as though things might be getting interesting. Then Spieth rises up and drains an amazing birdie putt. Watching him drop some of the most improbable putts is becoming as routine as Phil’s previously mentioned flop shot magic. This one capped off a year the likes of which we may never witness again.

5. Brandt Snedeker – 2012 Tour Championship

Sneds started this day tied for the lead with future gold-medal winner Justin Rose. He played a great round that put Justin on the ropes, and then he virtually sealed the tournament and FedEx Cup trophies simultaneously with this chip in on the 17th hole.

4. Henrik Stenson – 2013 Deutsche Bank Championship

Henrik had a very good year up to this point in 2013. He finished second at the Open, third at the PGA Championship, and second at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational. At this point, it turned from a good year to a great year as he holed out from a greenside bunker on the 17th hole to win this tournament and vault into first place in the FedEx Cup standings. He would go on to win the Tour Championship and seal the FedEx Cup that year.

3. Jim Furyk – 2013 BMW Championship.

Though technically not one single shot, a 59 is wildly impressive. Jim Furyk (also the proud owner of a 58) hit every fairway, missed only one green, and holed one out for eagle on the 15th hole (his 6th). Going out in 28 meant he could even withstand a three-putt bogey on the 5th hole (his 14th) en route to an insanely low number. Especially on a cold, windy day outside Chicago.

2. Rory McIlroy – 2016 Tour Championship

In a wild year where the FedEx Cup was up for grabs until nearly the very last putt dropped, Rory found himself three shots back with three to play in the final round at East Lake. He delivered a massive hole out for eagle on the 16th hole to surge upward at precisely the right time. Rory would dispose of Ryan Moore and Kevin Chappell in a playoff to win the Tour Championship and swipe the FedEx Cup away from Dustin Johnson, resulting in a pay day north of $11.5 million.

1. Bill Haas – 2011 Tour Championship

Haas was in a playoff with Hunter Mahan with both the Tour Championship and FedEx Cup titles on the line. He was completely on the ropes when he pulled off this shot from the water hazard to save par and extend the playoff, which he went on to win. What else is there to say? Onions!

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Peter Schmitt is an avid golfer trying to get better every day, the definition of which changes relatively frequently. He believes that first and foremost, golf should be an enjoyable experience. Always. Peter is a former Marine and a full-time mechanical engineer (outside of the golf industry). He lives in Lexington, KY with his wife and two young kids. "What other people may find in poetry or art museums, I find in the flight of a good drive." -Arnold Palmer

9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. xjohnx

    Sep 11, 2017 at 8:53 am

    I’m sure no one watched football yesterday either.

  2. Radim Pavlicek

    Sep 11, 2017 at 2:55 am

    Rory should have been Nr.1

  3. Radim Pavlicek

    Sep 11, 2017 at 2:54 am

    Still thing Rory should be Nr.1

  4. Rex

    Sep 10, 2017 at 9:08 pm

    Kucher has always judged those 15 hop 7 irons so well. Probably the best 13-17 hop 7 iron punch shot players in the business

  5. Ida

    Sep 10, 2017 at 1:19 am

    Today, Sunday, September 10th, thousands of people will be drowned by the storm surge in Florida. Meanwhile, we slobber over golf clubs and golf swings. Sad.

    • acemandrake

      Sep 10, 2017 at 9:13 am

      Honor the dead, help the survivors, celebrate life

    • Golfandpuff

      Sep 10, 2017 at 10:54 am

      First of all, why are you even here trolling about? Seriously, this article did not diminish in any way what is going on in FL. Second, there was more than enough time for those thousands you estimate to get out…run from death and save themselves.

      W/O a doubt Haas played shot of a lifetime…could give any short game guru a bucket of balls and they would not do better.

    • LITM

      Sep 10, 2017 at 4:02 pm

      It’s nobody I know so I don’t care

    • Fk

      Sep 11, 2017 at 1:45 am

      Yeah, and tomorrow will be 9/11, so whatchu gonna do then? You’re a facking kant

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Club Junkie

Club Junkie: Personal golf workshop – What you need to start gripping clubs

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You can set up your own golf workshop for regripping for about $100. I go over what you need, starting off with space and a workbench. Then I break down the simple tools, around $100, that it takes to grip and regrip your own clubs. Pretty simple and a great way to get into golf club building and tinkering!

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Golf's Perfect Imperfections

Golf’s Perfect Imperfections: Here is the name of our teaching method…

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You have to listen to this to find out!

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Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: A shot to a spot

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Over the past few years, golf has entered the statistical era, with the help of ShotLink, launch monitors, and “strokes gained.” As more and more data is analyzed, much is being written about which parts of the game are most important to scoring and winning out on tour.

It started out with “strokes gained-putting” as maybe the best indicator, but of late, we are reading more and more about ‘strokes gained-shotmaking’, which is the measure of a golfer’s ability to keep it in play and hit greens in regulation.
However, the statistics on strokes gained on tour are very different from the game most recreational golfers play. Realize that “out there”, all these guys are extraordinarily skilled in every aspect of the game, so what separates the winner from the “also-rans” in any given week drills down to a very few specific things. That is a far cry from the game you play week in and week out.

So, what about your game?

From my observation, for almost any recreational golfer, hitting 2-3 more greens per round does two things for you. 1) It gives you that many more birdie tries, and you’ll just have to make some of them. And 2) it takes that much heat off your scrambling. For the average golfer, a missed green leads to a bogey or worse more often than not. Very few recreational golfers can come close to an up-and-down percentage of anywhere near 50%, and most are around 20% at best. Think about that.

So, here’s one way to look at how you might be able to hit more greens in regulation. On the PGA Tour, greens-in-regulation percentage drops by almost half on shots from the rough over shots from the fairway. If that doesn’t hammer home the importance of hitting fairways, I don’t know what will.

Growing up in the era of persimmon drivers – which I’m sure many of you completely missed – the driver was for positioning the ball in the right part of the fairway for an approach shot, not for just blasting as far “that way” as possible. The top players of the era hit their drives to particular spots that allowed for the best approach to the green, and they didn’t let it “all out” all that often.

In his 1949 book “Power Golf” Ben Hogan, listed his ‘regular’ distance with a driver as 265, but his ‘maximum’ as 300. Who keeps 35 yards in reserve for only those times when you really need it?

So, here’s a little experiment for you the next time you can get out for a “practice nine” in the afternoon or early morning.

Each time you hit a drive in the rough, walk it out to the fairway and then back 10 to 15 yards. My bet is that you’ll find that the hole plays a bit easier, even though you have a longer club in your hands for your approach shot.

Then think about how much better you might score if you thought of each drive as a comfortably controlled shot to a spot, rather than just “hit it that way as far as I can.”

Just something to change the game a bit and keep it interesting.

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