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Cleveland CBX wedges, for golfers who play cavity-back irons

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Next time you’re at a golf course, take a look in the bag of a fellow golfer. Chances are you’ll see a set of lightweight, cavity-back irons. These are called game-improvement irons in the industry, and according to Cleveland 84 percent of golfers use them. Then look at that same golfer’s wedges. Undoubtedly, you’ll find blade wedges that are heavy and unforgiving. Why do average golfers give up forgiveness on their wedges when they deem forgiveness necessary in their irons?

Solving this conundrum is the crux of Cleveland’s new CBX wedges, which are designed to mesh better with a set of cavity-back irons than other wedges on the market, or at least better than Cleveland wedges in the past.

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To accomplish this, Cleveland’s CBX wedges have a cavity-back design that utilizes perimeter weighting. Seventy-six grams of mass was removed middle of the wedges and spread to their outer edges, according to Cleveland. For golfers, that leads to greater forgiveness on shots impacted off-center, thus reducing the effect of mishits.

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Cleveland also touts “feel-balanced technology” with its CBX wedges, which pushes center of gravity (CG) toward the toe in order to balance in the club heads versus their predecessors. In order to do this, Cleveland has a wider sole and topline on the toe section of the club, as well as a redesigned hosel that removes weight from the heel. Overall, CG has shifted 3 grams more toeward — or more toward the center — than its previous wedge.

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In recent years, wedge makers have emphasized the importance of sole grinds in relation to turf interaction and shotmaking alike. In the CBX wedges, there is front-to-back V-Grind, as well as a heel-to-toe V-Grind (the heel portion of the sole is thinner than toe portion of the sole). The “dual” V-Grind is said to help the club glide better through the turf and prevent digging, as well as provide more versatility. In other words, it allows golfers to adjust the face and lie angle more easily to play different shots.

Screen Shot 2017-07-27 at 4.40.50 PM

As the wedges flow from gap wedge to sand wedge to lob wedge, the shapes and weights also change (see in the graphic above, provided by Cleveland). You’ll notice the lower-lofted CBX wedges have a smaller shape (they also weigh a bit less), mimicking the look and feel of short irons. The higher-lofted wedges are bigger in size and weigh slightly more, which makes them feel more like a traditional wedge. Cleveland says this progressive design will better mesh with the cavity-back or game-improvement irons that most golfers use.

18943550b6576939cea5630b68fc27deAs you’d expect from a Cleveland wedge, the CBX wedges also have the company’s Rotex (RTX) groove technology. That means the faces have deep, U-shaped grooves with sharp radii, “micro-milled” grooves between each bigger groove, and laser-milling. Collectively, these features help “grab” the golf ball at impact and create additional spin.

Stock shafts in the CBX wedges are designed to be lighter than traditional after-market wedge shafts like you’d see on Tour. They include True Temper’s Dynamic Gold 115 (steel), as well as a Rotex Precision graphite wedge shaft that weighs just 90 grams.

Specs and Pricing

Screen Shot 2017-07-27 at 4.45.32 PM

Cleveland CBX wedges will hit stores on September 15, and they will sell for $129.99 apiece with steel shafts, and $139.99 each for graphite.

Discussion: See what GolfWRX Members are saying about Cleveland’s CBX wedges.

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He played on the Hawaii Pacific University Men's Golf team and earned a Masters degree in Communications. He also played college golf at Rutgers University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.

11 Comments

11 Comments

  1. OB

    Sep 8, 2017 at 3:56 pm

    The club designers are always attempting to design out the average golfer’s swing flaws by shifting mass all over the back of the clubhead.

    Look at the Ping Zing and Zing2 clubhead design and you will see the optimal mass distribution across a clubhead and the club sole.

  2. Bob Bissonette

    Aug 21, 2017 at 6:21 am

    I’ve been a proponent of this concept for years. It’s about time.

  3. BusterG

    Aug 1, 2017 at 2:31 pm

    Wow I love the look of these Clev wedges front and back. They are winners

  4. Doug A

    Aug 1, 2017 at 10:51 am

    Doesn’t Tour Edge already have a CBX line?

  5. Timbleking

    Aug 1, 2017 at 10:10 am

    Many years ago I was one of the first to demo the Ping iWedges in my country, and I really felt a difference from the very first bunker shot. Forgiving, confidence-makers, so easy to hit from any lie for any type of shot.
    Those ones look like them a lot.

  6. Philip

    Jul 31, 2017 at 10:05 pm

    No issue with it, but the most forgiving wedges I have ever played are my current Vokey’s – it is all in the grind/loft/bounce combo … and the golfer swinging the club that creates forgiveness – not just the club design in isolation. But I know a lot of golfers that could use some serious help with wedges so there definitely is a market for easier wedges if indeed having a cavity design helps with those tricky touchy ones around the green. Even if it is just the V-soles and the cavity is mostly marketing – every little bit helps

  7. tom

    Jul 31, 2017 at 7:08 pm

    RTX3 CB wedges are great. Best “full shot” wedge I have played.

  8. RG

    Jul 31, 2017 at 4:21 pm

    I play a Ping Eye 2 l wedge and two Cleveland CG16’s in 56 and 52 which are all cavity back. The great difference is in chipping and pitching. Hitting chips and pitches is sooo much easier and sooo much more precise with a cavity back wedge. Isn’t that what it’s really all about? I make my hay getting up and down and knocking it close on par 5’s. Really want to try these wedges.

  9. Paul

    Jul 31, 2017 at 9:44 am

    Cleveland making cavity back wedges isn’t new, I own 4 of them already! Cleveland 588 Rotex 2.0 CB.

    Now arguably they aren’t truly ‘cavity back’. The new design look like Cleveland much more aggressive with the weight distribution.

    I have to say my current wedges include a 62°, and I’d be lost without it.

    Make a 62° and a 64° for this set please Cleveland!

  10. TexasSnowman

    Jul 31, 2017 at 9:18 am

    Makes total sense to me; always wondered why premium wedges were not offered in a cavity back design; Especially when the Ping Eye2 wedges remained so popular even with lower handicappers.

  11. xjohnx

    Jul 31, 2017 at 8:41 am

    I don’t think this is a bad idea.

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Equipment

The most popular golf shoes on Amazon right now (Fall 2020 edition)

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What are the most popular golf shoes on Amazon right now? From time to time, we like to get out of our little bubble of OEM releases and what’s being played on tour to look at what golf consumers are buying on one of the largest online retail marketplaces: Amazon.

Here are some of the best-selling golf shoes on Amazon as of October 2020.

1. Adidas Men’s Tech Response Golf Shoes

From the listing:Mesh/synthetic. Imported. Synthetic sole. Thintech, adituff, thintech cleat, traxion, adiwear. Lightweight mesh and synthetic upper for enhanced breathability and comfort. Soft eva insole for lightweight comfort and cushioning. 6-spike configuration with thintech low-profile technology for improved traction and stability.”

Price: $59.99

Buy here.

2. Skechers Go Golf Men’s Torque Waterproof Golf Shoe

From the listing:Synthetic. Imported. lace-up. Rubber sole. Shaft measures approximately mid-top from arch. Replaceable soft spikes. Waterproof.”

Price: $59.99

Buy here.

3. FootJoy Men’s Fj Flex Golf Shoes

 

From the listing:100% Textile. Imported. Synthetic sole. Shaft measures approximately mid-top from arch. Performance Mesh – lightweight performance mesh delivers incredible comfort, breathability and all-day comfort. Complete support – a soft EVA midsole provides increased underfoot cushioning, enhanced comfort and exceptional stability.”

Price: $89.99

Buy here.

4. PUMA Men’s Ignite Nxt Lace Golf Shoe

From the listing:100% Textile and Synthetic. Imported. Synthetic sole. Shaft measures approximately low-top from arch. Sole shield. Performance Mesh +TPU. Ignite Foam.”

Price: $99.99

Buy here.

5. Skechers GO GOLF Men’s Max Golf Shoe

From the listing:Imported. Rubber sole. Shaft measures approximately mid-top from arch. Skechers Goga Max insole delivers enhanced high-rebound cushioning for all day comfort. Durable grip tpu outsole with a spikeless bottom. Lightweight. Water resistant. Synthetic upper.”

Price: $74.97

Buy here.

6. Adidas Men’s Tour360 Xt Spikeless Golf Shoe

From the listing: Leather and Synthetic. Imported. Synthetic sole. Shaft measures approximately low-top from arch. Leather and microfiber synthetic upper. Spikeless Puremotion outsole for enhanced flexibility and grip with X-Traxion primary lugs for grip and balance.”

Price: $135.59

Buy here.

7. FootJoy Men’s Fj Originals Golf Shoes

From the listing: Built on the Austin Last, this last offers the fullest rounded toe character, fullest fit across forefoot, standard instep and heel. EVA (ethyl vinyl acetate) Fit-Beds provide lightweight cushioning underfoot. EVA does not take a set, so the cushioning will remain the same for the life of the shoe. This easy care synthetic upper offers outstanding 1 year waterproof comfort, breathability, and durability.”

Price: $89.95

Buy here.

8. Skechers Women’s Max Golf Shoe

From the listing:Imported. Rubber sole. Shaft measures approximately mid-top from arch. Spikeless, durable grip tpu outsole. Ultra-lightweight, responsive ULTRA Flight cushioning. Goga max insole delivers enhanced high-rebound cushioning. Water resistant. Synthetic upper.”

Price: $57.55

Buy here.

9. FootJoy Women’s Sport Retro-Previous Season Style Golf Shoes

From the listing: ” Lightweight – the linen-textured synthetic uppers offer lightweight comfort and durability. Cushioned rubber – the gum rubber outsole is a soft rubber compound which provides flexibility and comfort. Enhanced traction – This molded rubber outsole provides turf gripping performance and durability.”

Price: $59.95

Buy here.

10. New Balance Men’s Sweeper Waterproof Spiked Comfort Golf Shoe

From the listing: Synthetic. Imported.Rubber sole.Shaft measures approximately low-top from arch. Waterproof microfiber leather upper. REVlite 10mm drop* midsole provides lightweight cushioning & premium responsiveness. NDurance rubber outsole with removable FTS 3.0 Pulsar spikes.”

Price: $59.99

Buy here.

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Justin Thomas: What makes him an elite wedge player

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It might be easy to say that a player like Justin Thomas is near the top of the leaderboard because

  1. He hits it the best
  2. He drives it long and relatively straight
  3. He is having a good putting week

I would agree and disagree with all three. Yes, they are definitely factors, but in my opinion, it’s his wedge play that has been the most notable part of his game—especially in 2020.

If you look at the stats, you will find a player who is not only damn-near deadly from 150 yards and in, but also a player who gets out of trouble about as well as anyone in the top 10 in the world.

We are talking about 2020 as a whole FYI.

(Stats via PGATour.com)

Now strokes gained wedge stats have multiple variables affecting the ultimate stat, fairways hit, where a player misses it, out of the rough vs out of the fairway, putting, yada, yada, yada….

At this point, if I had to pick a player to get it done around the greens it would JT or Jon Rahm. True artists. Go back and watch some of the shots from the FedEx at TPC Southwind or even Kapalua this year, it was the reliance on his wedges that became the secret sauce. Like the putter, good wedge play can be an equalizer when anything else is falling short. And when the rest of the bag is decent, for a player like JT, good wedge play equals wins.

I wanted to dig in a little deeper, so I asked my old friend, Vokey’s Aaron Dill a few questions on what makes JT unique with a wedge in his hands…

JW: As far as technique, what in his action makes JT so good? And if you could compare him to someone who would it be?

AD: Justin’s technique is really something to watch. His ability to stay loose, calm, and maintain effortless speed while delivering the wedge accurately really shows his comfort with a wedge in his hands. Justin keeps the club out in front of him and he has mastered the ability to control his golf ball’s flight and spin.  I could compare him to many, but I sometimes feel he is in a league of his own.  

JW: Beyond the great shots we see on highlight reels, where does JT really get it done from an SG perspective? What do you see that the average person wouldn’t? 

AD: Justin does it all very well. You know this because he is 9th in SG around the green and this is partly due to his spotless technique but his ability to scramble in difficult situations. Something he does that amazes me is his creative vision of shots. There are times when he is in a situation where he hits a shot we don’t expect or think of. His comfort with a wedge is fun to watch, he makes all short game shots seem like they are no big deal and you can see this by his free-flowing, loose and speedy wedge action. You can tell he feels at peace with his wedge technique.

JW: He has an interesting set up for his wedges that has been well covered, but since you first met him, how has his understanding and approach to his wedges and wedge play evolved?

AD: Justin’s wedge set is unique, however, a lot of thought and intelligence has gone into crafting this matrix. Since the first time I met him, he has worked hard and he has always had the desire to want to improve and push himself. You can see it in his strength training, his increase in ball speed, and his general approach to competitive golf. His knowledge of his short game has improved over the years and it shows in his success. You can see how comfortable he feels when a wedge is pulled from the bag, you can bet he will be landing the ball close to the hole setting himself up for a makable putt.

Justin Thomas’ wedge specs 

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design Raw SM7 (46-10F @47.5, 52-12F @52.5), Vokey SM8 (56-14F @57), Titleist Vokey Design WedgeWorks (60T @ 60.5)

Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100 (46), True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400 (52-60)

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How to pick the right putter

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In the game of golf, putting is the great equalizer. It doesn’t take speed or strength and simply requires you to select a line and hit a ball at the right speed—easier said than done. But regardless of your skill level, it is the one club in your set you really never have to upgrade once you find the right one, which is why knowing how to pick the right putter is so important.

This is the GolfWRX guide to selecting the right putter for you.

How to pick the right putter: The right look

This one seems simple, but you have to like the look of your putter and feel comfortable lining it up. For some golfers, that means finding a more traditional heel and toe weighted blade with a basic metal finish, for others that could also mean a larger mallet style that inspires confidence thanks to its larger footprint and contrasting colors.

Between the two aforementioned styles, there are still varying hosel/neck (where the shaft meet the head) configurations that can change how a putter wants to naturally rest when being held which can, in turn, change the natural toe hang of the putter and how it will fit.

How to pick the right putter: Understanding putter toe hang types

  • Face Balanced – Depending on the hosel configuration, this style can be found on both mallet and blade-style putters, and when being balanced by the shaft, the face will sit perpendicular to 12 o’clock. These are intended to fit golfers with a straight back-straight through stroke/minimal face rotation.

  • 1/2 Toe Hang – This is the most neutral type of toe hang and sits between the face balanced and full toe down. It is found on most heel-toe blade putters with full-shaft offset (Scotty Cameron Newport 2 shown) and is for slightly arcing strokes with medium face rotation.

  • Toe Down/Full Toe Hang  – This type is only going to be found on the most heel-shafted blade-style putters, and when being balanced by the shaft, the toe will face “6 0’clock”—directly down to the ground. These are intended to fit golfers with the most extremely arcing stroke and high level of face rotation.

NOTE: There are multiple variations of 1/2 toe hang that sit both closer to full toe down and face-balanced all designed to fit various stroked depending on the amount of arc and face rotation.

Whatever reason you have for picking the putter you ultimately use, make sure you like the looks of it because you’re going to be seeing a lot of each other.

How to pick the right putter: Understanding your stroke style

Your putting stroke will inevitably play a big role in the putter you select because certain styles are going to work better for certain golfers depending on their putting stroke style, which is referenced above. To make it easy to understand—putting strokes can be put into three categories, and for visual reference, check out the handy guide below with pictures supplied by our friends at Ping.

Slight Arc

Fitter and golfer reviewing PING Color Code Chart

This is where most golfers fit in since it is the most natural stroke to make. A slight arc is also what I like to call a neutral stroke, meaning that when it comes to picking a putter it gives the golfers the most options for finding one that is going to fit best.

Straight back and straight through

Fitter applying impact tape to bottom of iron

A straight back and straight through stroke can help a lot of golfers eliminate variables, and when paired with the right putter can really help those that struggle to get putts started on line. Golfers in this category usually perform best with a face-balanced putter.

Strong Arc

Fitter watching golfer hit shots

A strongly arced stroke is the exact opposite of straight back-straight through and requires the most amount of practice and technique to maintain consistency. Players with a strong arc generally also use a lot more wrist in their stroke and because of the inconsistency, this stroke creates, there are fewer putters on the market that fit this type.

Putting it all together

Once you have selected your putter, the last step is getting it dialed into your final spec for length, lie, and loft. For length, the goal is to be able to stand in a comfortable putting position with your eyes over the ball or, just inside of your eye line.

For lie and loft, it is best to see a fitter, since it requires specialized tools to properly adjust, but if you are trying to get an idea for the direction your putter will need to be bent use the reference guide below.

To see how a professional putting fitting is conducted, check out the video below from TXG

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