Connect with us

Courses

Tobiano. Canada’s Best New Course.

Published

on

The Green at Hole No. 8, Par 5Every now and again we are reminded why golf course architecture is an art. In his new masterpiece Tobiano, Thomas McBroom has reminded us once again that the architect must have the eye of an artist, experience of an engineer and all the while remain a golfer at heart.

Situated 15 minutes outside Kamloops, British Columbia, the golf course is part of an $800 million project that will include a lake-side marina, three hotels, over 1000 residential units, equestrian facilities and more. Inheriting its name from the Tobiano painted horse, the course thematic draws upon the site’s ranch land history- from the tee decks to the clubhouse detailing. 

Desert courses with their lush green grass contrasting rough and brown landscapes can easily be more eye candy than a test of the game. Fortunately, Tobiano side-steps this trivial design gimmick, boasting both stunning beauty and strategy. Shouldering bluffs situated above the lake, fairways are nestled into the rugged dunes with mountain backdrops. Adding a bunkering style that gently pulls away the surface of fescues and cacti, the result is a test for golfers of all abilities.   

Three years ago as a Landscape Architect student, a University project led to my having the pleasure of meeting McBroom. With an unassuming Toronto office that feels more like a one bedroom apartment holding outdated computers from the early ’90’s rather than a design studio which fuels creativity and design, one begins to wonder how this man creates world class golf courses from a selection of air-photos and pencil crayons. 

Yet McBroom’s method is tried and proven with more than 60 internationally acclaimed courses. With several more underway, McBroom has risen to the top of the game in golf course architecture in Canada and around the world. In 2006 he had 12 courses ranked among the top 100 in Canada; and in 5 of the last 13 years he’s been responsible for Canada’s Best New Course of The Year.

Open for play in July 2007, Tobiano’s official grand opening was last month and looks poised to earn McBroom another award. Four additional courses in the province planned and underway has made McBroom a clear leader in BC’s golf boom which has several new courses from the likes of Nicklaus, Couples, Player, and shortly Annika Sorenstam. In what will be her debut new course design in North America, Annika is pairing her passion for the game with none other than McBroom himself.

As a new course, the bentgrass fairways at Tobiano are nicer than some of the local Vancouver courses’ greens I’ve played, and McBroom’s innovative white silica sand lends great feel and consistency to the traps. Fairways ripple and wave creating many kinds of lies. And though the front nine’s fescue my seem difficult to overcome its length and density will likely decrease as the course becomes more established, requiring less irrigation. The greens putt fast and true with many opportunities for exciting pin placements. Though the course measured them to 11 on the stimpmeter, they were a pleasure to play.

The course itself displays a routing rich in diversity. The par 72 layout tallies to 36 on both nines, with the back having three par 5’s and three par 3’s. Using wind wisely, at least one par 3 points to each direction of the compass; while the par 5’s capitalize on natural topography and the par 4’s, playing long and short, test all clubs in the bag. 

With the wind at your back, No. 2 lets you think about going for the green off the tee, while bunkering at a hundred yards from the green protects against laying up for an easy wedge approach. A well scripted grass swale in front collects any shots short of the small green, also protected by more bunkering. Although one of the easier, and probably less memorable holes on the course, it displays a textbook execution of architecture fundamentals. 

Arriving at No. 7 you’ll find a par 3 that plays like a 155 yard island green without water. Into a fierce wind, dropping off into sage and sand, hitting the shallow green perpendicular to the angle of approach is sure to build your confidence.

If there is one thing to be learned from course architecture it’s that retrospect is the mark of a good golf hole. And after playing the par 5 No. 8 it’s easy to look back and recount several different ways to play it next time. Starting with a demanding 220+ yard carry into the wind, a second shot must find the fairway which veers sharp and blindly between bunkering on the left and a steep desert crevasse at right. Finally, the approach is protected by bunkering left and right while falling sharp right and behind into a fescue ridden area you would rather lose your ball than have the unfortunate fate of trying to hit out of. Combined, this three shot par 5 demands appropriate club selection and skillful execution, making it easy to see why it is the number 1 handicap on course.

Along the back nine the plot builds and the beauty increases. Climbing up ranchland terrain, yeilding panoramic views, each hole is a fair test, while retaining potential to score. The toughest is No. 12, a 232 yard par 3 bunkered left and right. As the holes move on the fescue lessens and the required carries diminish making a more pleasurable golfing experience. 

If there was one thing to improve upon at Tobiano it would be the way in which the play ends. While there is nothing wrong with any of the holes which form the closing par 5,3,4 sequence, none are what I would call strong finishing holes. Being a modest hitter, and playing from the spur tees, downhill and downwind I hit the par 5, 16th in two with a pitching wedge in hand. No. 17 is a short par 3 at 143 yards, and No. 18 is a matter of one well-struck shot off the tee.

As a golf enthusiast and armchair architect at heart, I can only hope that Tobiano will push the level of golf course design to new heights. Contrasting wisping visual lines with rugged contours, Tobiano is a three-dimensional piece of art expressively instilled with the passions of experienced artistry and golfing brilliance by the McBroom design team. Even with the development planned to take place, Tobiano will remain a core course in its typology; uninterrupted by, all things considered, minimal housing lining the course itself. Though I imagine some of the vistas, in particular those of the lake, will be spoiled in the name of real estate the course is unquestionably a work of art surrounded by a surreal landscape.

Undoubtedly, Tobiano is the best new course in Canada.

 

 

For a flyby tour of each hole, check the website, http://www.tobianogolf.com/golf/coursetour.php 

Tee    Yardage    Course Rating/ Slope Rating

Iron     7328      75.2 / 134

Spur    6835      72.8 / 127

Lake    6241      70.2 /125

Sage    5289      65.7 / 111

 

    Tobiano   |   Hole No. 1, Par 5

 

   Tobiano   |   Hole No. 6, Par 4

   Tobiano   |   Hole No. 15, Par 3

 

   Tobiano   |   Hole No. 17, Par 3

 

   Tobiano   |   Clubhouse Patio

Your Reaction?
  • 0
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Courses

The best golf courses in Ireland

Published

on

For a tiny island with fewer than 10 million people, Ireland has an abundance of magnificent golf courses.

But which ones are the best?

The best golf courses in Ireland

Pinning down 10 to even 50 of Ireland’s best courses is a thankless task, with a country that boasts so many hidden gems along with world-renowned tracks. The island is split into four provinces—Leinster, Munster, Connacht, and Ulster—and here I’ll highlight some courses you must visit in each region for anyone heading to the Emerald Isle.

Mount Juliet Golf Course, Kilkenny

C/o: @golfmountjuliet

Host of the 2021 Irish Open, the Jack Nicklaus designed golf course is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful in all of the country. With five lakes and over 80 bunkers, the challenging course measures over 7,200 yards and features a unique ‘bunker walled green’ protecting the pin on the 16th hole.

C/o: @golfmountjuliet

Speaking on the course while playing the 2002 WGC-American Express Championship, Tiger Woods said

“I think the golf course is absolutely gorgeous, the fairways are perfect, the greens are the best greens we’ve putter on all year, including the majors. These things are absolute pure.”

Druids Glen Golf Course, Wicklow

C/o: @brendanboyle79

You don’t get the nickname the ‘Augusta of Europe’ without being a little bit special, and Druids Glen is undoubtedly that. The perfectly manicured inland course boasts some of the most picturesque holes with each hole offering stunning backdrops.

C/o: @breandanboyle79

The course also offers up an incredible challenge. It helps to be a high-quality ball-striker, with the likes of Colin Montgomerie and Sergio Garcia winning titles when the course hosted professional events.

Ballybunion Golf Club, Kerry

C/o: @evanschiller

Founded in 1883, the Ballybunion Old Course lives up to its tag as ‘One of a kind’. Measuring 6,739 yards from the tips, the wonderful dunescape sets the scene for a true links challenge, with the golf course often touted as possessing the best back nine in the country.

C/o: @womensgolf

President Bill Clinton on Ballybunion

“I love Ballybunion. It’s perfectly Irish: beautiful, rough, and a lot like life — you get breaks you don’t deserve both ways. You just have to keep swinging and know it will all even out.”

Waterville Golf Links, Kerry

C/o: @kevinmarkham

The remote Waterville Golf Links is situated on a promontory surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean. With undulating fairways, the course sets out relatively flat on the front 9 with tall dunes welcoming players home for the back 9.

C/o: @greagolfholes

One of the most impressive and picturesque links courses that you will set your sights on that will instantly provide you with a mystic feel that only Ireland can provide.

Sam Snead on Waterville:

”The beautiful monster – one of the golfing wonders of the world.”

Rosappena Old Tom Morris Links, Donegal

C/o:@rosapenna1893

An incredible setting for a course that offers up a wonderful mix of a traditional and modern links feel. Measuring over 6,900 yards from the back tees, the course only offers up relief on the three par-fives.

C/o: @eigtravel

The course runs along Tramore beach overlooking Sheephaven Bay and offers up sensational views no matter what hole you are on during your round. Blustery conditions can turn this into a brutal links test.

Royal County Down

C/o: @eigtravel

Often cited as the best golf course in the country and even the world. Royal County Down offers up monstrous blind shots, several bunkers and glorious views. The ultimate links golf test.

C/o: @eigtravel

Rickie Fowler on Royal County Down:

”Royal County Down is my all-time favourite.”

Lahinch Golf Club, Clare

C/o: @greatgolfholes

Lahinch Golf Club is a step back in time golf course often compared to the Old Course of St. Andrews. The course offers up a quirky test wth a classic out and back layout, while providing stunning views of the Atlantic Ocean.

C/o: @vinnyfiorino

Phil Mickelson on Lahinch:

“Some of my fondest memories of great golfing holes in the world include the number four and five holes at Lahinch.”

Sligo Golf Club, Rosses Point, Sligo

C/o: @jmgolfcoach

Co. Sligo Golf Course features traditional links layout, designed by Harry Colt. The dune-covered landscape sets the scene for a course packed with undulations, elevated tees, and raised plateau greens for a stunning test of golf. The golf course is famed for its tremendous par 3s.

Your Reaction?
  • 58
  • LEGIT3
  • WOW2
  • LOL2
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB1
  • SHANK9

Continue Reading

Courses

The Colonial Experience

Published

on

Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas, is home to the longest-running non-major PGA Tour event held at one location. The course opened in 1936, and it’s been hosting the Invitational at Colonial, now called the Charles Schwab Challenge, every year since 1946.

It was the golfing home of Ben Hogan, five-time winner of the event, and it’s still where most of his trophies and accomplishments are housed. The 1941 U.S. Open was here and won by Craig Wood. The Players Championship was here in 1975 and the U.S. Women’s Open was here in 1991. Colonial, quite simply, is rich golf history in a town that is proud of where it came from. And you can feel the past as soon as you step foot on the grounds.

Walking through the gates towards the course, you are immediately hugged by a “wow” moment. There’s Mr. Hogan, his follow through forever posed, larger than life and overlooking the 18th hole. Also in view is a manually operated leaderboard, permanently tucked away inside the closing hole’s dogleg, reminding you subtly that you are about to play a Tour course. It’s up year-round, and as the tournament nears, Mr. Hogan’s name always appears in the first place position.

   

18th Hole

Down the steps and around the corner, past the caddie shack and old school bag room, is the starter house and number one tee box. And shadowing over the professional tees is the Wall of Champions, with every winning player’s name and score etched to watch your opening tee shot. Hogan’s name is there five times. Sam Snead. Arnold Palmer. Jack Nicklaus. Ben Crenshaw, Phil Mickelson and Lee Trevino all on there twice. Tom Watson. Sergio. Spieth.

Some courses are second shot courses, with approach shots being more demanding and more important than driving accuracy or distance. Some courses require length. At Colonial, you need both. That’s why the list of past winners is so impressive on the Wall of Champions. You can’t just drive or putt your way to a win at Colonial. You have to be solid in every aspect of the game. You have to earn it and deserve it. You have to be a shotmaker.

Number One Tee

Par 5 1st Hole

Colonial was designed by Texan John Bredemus and well-known architect Perry Maxwell, who also designed Prairie Dunes in Kansas and Southern Hills in Tulsa, Oklahoma. It opened in 1936 and currently plays as a 7,209-yard par 70 that meanders along the banks of the Trinity River. The greens are bent grass, which at one point in time was an unheard of idea for a course in North Texas. Marvin Leonard, the club’s founder, was determined to build a world-class club in the region that could sustain bent grass. And he did it. Just five years after the club opened its doors, the 1941 United States Open was held in Fort Worth. Colonial was on the map and the Marvin Leonard dream had come true.

The course holds only two par 5’s, the first hole being one of them. A 565-yard dogleg right to a slight elevated green, getting home in two isn’t out of the question with a perfectly placed drive. But this introductory hole is the perfect way to start a round. Nothing too demanding. Get warmed up. The second hole, a short par 4, is no different. Start off easy to get some good holes under your belt.

And then you get to the Horrible Horseshoe.

Hole 3 Tee box

The third hole at Colonial is a 483-yard par 4 that plays even longer than that, due to the severe 90-degree dogleg left near your drive’s landing area. A straight 250-yard tee shot will put you in decent position away from trouble, but you still have 230 yards into a multi-tiered green. Longer hitters can try to cut the corner, protected by bunkers at the corner, but the landing area for that shot is so narrow that the reward is often not worth the risk. This is a tough hole.

Hole 4 Teebox

The fourth hole is a 220-yard par 3 from the men’s tees. But it tips out to 247 yards for the pros during tournament week. The green is elevated and often very firm, making it incredibly tough to stop a long iron or hybrid on the dance floor for even the best players in the world. This is a tough tough hole. Short is the safe play, though there is no easy up and down from the front, as the green is elevated to eye level and making most chip shots blind.

Hole 5 Tee box

Hole 5 Approach

Hole 5 Green

The fifth hole, ending the Horrible Horseshoe, is one of the finest and toughest holes in golf. Your tee shot dog legs just enough to the right to require a left-to-right ball flight. Something to make you think about standing over your ball. Anything off the tee that is too straight or has any right to left movement is going to cross through the fairway and into an oak tree-lined ditch with rough high enough to swallow a ball for weeks. If you start in the ditch, you finish in the ditch. So don’t miss left.

Don’t miss right either. Anything with too much fade or slice action is going into the Trinity River, which borders this hole on the right all the way to the green. And if you can somehow manage to find the fairway, you’re still a long way from home as this is a 481-yard par 4 leading to a well-bunkered green. This is a tough, tough, tough hole.

If you can get through these three holes, arguably the hardest three-hole stretch on tour, unscathed, you’ve done something.

Hole 6 Teebox

The rest of the front nine is easy, in comparison to the horseshoe, but by no means simple. Six and seven are wonderfully partnered par fours, running parallel in opposite directions. The par 3 8th hole brings the Trinity River back into view, but the water itself is not a real threat. The hole plays 194 yards from the back tees to a three-tiered green. The safe play is always aiming to the middle of the green and letting the putter do the rest of the work. Missing this green completely will not likely result in par, as deep bunkering and wide trees protect on all sides.

The closing hole of the front nine requires a precise tee ball between large bunkers on both sides of the fairway. The green is tucked behind a scenic pond and in front of the starter’s house and number one tee box. Any miss, left or right off the tee, will most likely force a layup in front of the water. But if you do have a shot at the green, make sure you don’t miss short.

From nine green, you can see much of the front, hopefully recalling fond memories of the first half of your round. Thankfully, not much of the horrible horseshoe is in view…let’s keep that in the past.

9th Green and Fairway

That back nine at Colonial is an absolute blast. The two par 3’s on this side are both world-class holes, 13 being the course’s signature. The lone par 5, hole 11, is a straightaway 635-yard-long mammoth with a troublesome creek along the entire right side.

But it all starts with the absolutely tremendous 10th hole. Only 408 yards from the tips, the hole plays tricks on the eyes. From the tee, it looks like you have plenty of room off on the right, but course knowledge can go a long way on this hole. You absolutely have to keep your tee ball hugging the left side of this fairway, which feels like a horrifying proposition while standing over the ball. The tee box falls off into the water, which doubles as approach shot hazard on nearby 18. Driver just isn’t the club here, though it feels like it should be. Any miss slightly right is going to be shielded from the green from overhanging trees and a deceptive angle.

Hole 10 tee box

View of 18 green from 10 fairway

10 green with fairway behind

The back nine has a bit more undulation than the front. The formerly brush-covered Trinity River land still has plenty of mature foliage, mostly oaks, pecans, and cottonwood trees,  to maintain the feel of an old-school course. It is truly a classic layout in every sense of the phrase. The bent grass greens, made famous by Mr. Leonard’s passionate pursuit, are pure most of the year, though fans are erected during the Summer months to keep them cool.

Hole 12 tee box

13 tee, par 3 over the Trinity

The par-3 13th hole is a tournament spectator favorite. 190 yards from the pro tees and 171 from the men’s, this hole is as beautiful as it is treacherous. The further you miss right, the more carry you’ll need to land safely. During tournament week, the professional caddies are in on a long-standing spectator event: the caddie races. Fan’s surrounding the green pick a player’s caddie to root for, then they cheer (and maybe even gamble) for that caddie to reach the green first. I’ve seen all-out sprint races and slow walk dramatic finishes alike. First foot to touch the green wins, and the caddies are hilarious about it. They eat it up.

14 approach

15 green

The home stretch at Colonial is designed for drama. The 16th, a par 3, is another stunner. 185 yards over creeks and ponds to the most difficult green complex on the course. Only two tiers, but a pretty drastic climb from front left to top right. And the Sunday pin placement, top right, has caused more heartburn than any other spot on the track. Miss too far right and you’re out of bounds and in the Colonial parking lot. There is a great patio just beyond the 16th green where members can sit to watch the approach shots.

Par 3 16th

17 green with fairway behind

17 is a strategic short par 4, where iron is the safe play off the tee. A dogleg right, the tee shot is more about angles and accuracy than length. Miss too far right and your approach into the green is dead, blocked by trees. A proper drive on the left middle of this fairway sets up a great chance for birdie. And at Colonial, you need to take advantage of these holes. Especially with 18 coming up.

The closing hole is a classic. Now you need a long draw off the tee to this 441-yard dogleg left. The fairway slopes right to left as well, so a shot on the right side here usually ends up in a wonderful position. The green is slightly elevated and guarded by incredibly deep bunkers short and on both sides. With that sloping fairway, the approach is generally a side-hill lie that works the ball left. And remember, that pond we saw on the 10th fairway is very much in play here. Any miss left and you are wet.

18 tee

18 approach

As if the water left isn’t enough pressure, the clubhouse is right there watching, typically bustling with activity and eyes on your shot. Plus, there is Mr. Hogan’s statue, always there to intimidate golfers as they walk off the green to end their round. The house that Hogan built.

Which is a perfect reminder to head inside the clubhouse for cocktail and tour around the Hogan Room. Located upstairs near the main entrance, this small room could take an hour or two of your time if you aren’t careful. Major championship trophies, scorecards, Mr. Hogan’s locker, the famous Merion flagpin, the Ryder Cup. It is a genuine thrill to walk through.

Downstairs, connected to the pro shop, is another Hogan tribute…the man’s personal office sits untouched and exactly how he kept it. It’s a bit like looking into the Oval office for golf nerds.

 

   

The rest of the clubhouse is a tribute to not only Mr. Hogan, but the history of the tournament itself. Every past champion is recognized with a photo of him holding the trophy, proudly wearing the Colonial plaid jacket, and displayed next to a golf club they used to accomplish the win, donated to Colonial. Clubs pulled from the bag of every past champion…walking the halls of Colonial is like walking through the Golf Hall of Fame. History around every corner.

There is also a special tribute to Dan Jenkins. The Fort Worth native and original wild-man golf writer was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2012. Jenkins played golf at nearby TCU and was a beloved member at Colonial. He was also close friends with Mr. Hogan. The display holds all of Jenkins’ wonderful books, including Dead Solid Perfect, as well as his typewriter. A hero of mine, it’s hard not to walk by the Jenkins Tribute and stop to admire. Every time.

Playing a round at Colonial is a special experience. Still one of the finest golf courses in Texas, it remains the home of golf history in the Lone Star State. Golf Mecca for Hogan fans, the course has withstood the test of time. And the clubhouse itself, with all its history and charm, is worth the price of admission. I feel better about the future of golf knowing clubs like Colonial are out there, working hard to keep the past alive.

Your Reaction?
  • 113
  • LEGIT47
  • WOW19
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

Courses

What GolfWRXers are saying about Seminole and TaylorMade’s Charity Relief skins match

Published

on

@pgatour

In our forums, our members have been discussing Seminole and TaylorMade’s Charity Relief skins match. The course has received plenty of praise from our members, and WRXers have been sharing their thoughts on the event as a whole in our forums.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • tw_focus: “Amazing event all around, golf is back baby. RF played well, but he missed badly on the last shot while Rors was clutch, as always. As good as this event was, it’s just the undercard for next week The Match II. Can’t wait to see TW back!”
  • RainShadow: “Seminole looked beautiful. A course designed for strategy and nuance. Anyone know the individual scores? Rickie 66 maybe, Rory 69, DJ 69, Wolff 70? The players all looked a little rusty, Rory and Rickie looked like they’d played a bit recently though. Need to do more of these after this thing is over. More of carrying their own bags and reading their own putts………..Side note….DJ, go back to a blade putter.”
  • dcfas: “I enjoyed it. Thought it was interesting to see and hear some of the discussion on shots and breaks. Thought it was also interesting to see their performances without caddies, and while carrying bags. Also fascinated to have a “close up” look at Seminole. Added it to my bucket list of courses extremely unlikely I’ll ever get to play. Good cause. Thumbs up.”
  • Lark: “If they do this again, they should have two matches at the same time to avoid so much dead airtime. Have the winners play a one hole playoff for a final prize.”
  • Dave230: “Good concept and some good bits but to be nit-picking: Far too many ads, I know Americans are used to more ads than Europeans, but they hit their drives…ads….hit their second shots….ads. It’s just hard to watch. Too much intervention from the commentators, if the players have microphones on then let them speak and just leave it there, you don’t need to talk over everything. I prefer commentary that’s not afraid of dead space. The phone calls…the less said the better.. Just let it play, even if they’re walking, let us see them talking and the surroundings sometimes. Still manage to overproduce even in a restricted setting. Apart from that, grateful for golf to be on television again and well done to those involved.”

Entire Thread: “Seminole and TaylorMade’s Charity Relief skins match”

 

Your Reaction?
  • 12
  • LEGIT2
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK2

Continue Reading

WITB

Facebook

Trending