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What’s Your Golf Style?

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Recently I’ve been involved in a few discussions about golf style. As the game has become more accessible and gained more mainstream popularity, the dress code has definitely been interpreted in new ways. Of course private and municipal courses have different standards and some have no real dress code at all. Today’s golfer is a mix of traditionalists and those with a more casual approach. A few things keep coming up in style conversations:

Bright colors – a la Camilo Villegas or Ian Poulter: Some are quite offended by the Columbian-born golfer’s style. Often wearing brightly colored coordinates with large belt buckles, he’s been called gaudy more than once. Others think he’s got a progressive, modern style.

Cargo shorts – like at your municipal course: These shorts can look more like “shants” (almost a short but closer to a pant) and tend to be a bit sloppy. The more tailored cargo with a smart shirt can look really nice though. On the other hand, who really cares when you’re just playing at the local 9 hole?

Shirts without collars – for men or women: Again, if you’re just at the range or cheap muni it probably doesn’t matter. I’ve seen some get very upset at Michelle Wie for sporting a tank and others who think you should golf in what is comfortable.

Sweat pants or gym clothes in general: Some think this is acceptable at the range but many purists seem to think this is a no-no in any situation.

Sneakers on the course instead of golf shoes: I’m pretty sure you can’t do this at many of the private clubs so it’s a non-issue. At the range or muni it probably doesn’t matter to most.

Old school – as in loud plaids or plus fours: Payne Stewart pulled off the old school style nicely. I’ve seen some great throwback plaids but some find them to be tacky.

Most of the “travesties” of fashion are committed at the more laid-back public courses. I’ve seen very mellow courses where there’s only one guy decked out in the Ashworth gear and he stands out like a sore thumb and gets stared at. I’ve also seen someone wearing a golf shirt and shoes with jeans get the stink eye. Each course I go to seems to have a distinct golf style of its own.

What’s your golf style? Are you a purist or do you throw on whatever is clean?

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11 Comments

11 Comments

  1. Jesse

    Oct 23, 2008 at 6:47 pm

    Syle in golf is huge. In my mind the better you look, the more confident you will be, and the better you will play. You don’t have to go extreme with some of the color combos that Camilo wears, but NOT always wearing a cotton striped shirt and khaki shorts or pants is good. Tech fabrics are huge right now with some styles that don’t scream middle age weekend golfer. Bright colors are great. Shorts and pants that are different than black, navy, or khaki can really add to your style like a plaid, yellow, light blue, white, or green paired with an appropriate solid colored or patterned, not stiped, shirt looks great. Model your style similar to most of the younger or clothing sponsored players on tour, they have people telling them what to wear!!!

  2. Adam

    Jun 26, 2008 at 1:18 am

    In fashion as with almost anything “Take Change by the Hand or it will Take You by the Throat.” Keep moving forward I for one am very pleased with the way fashion on the golf course it going. The new fabrics that wick away sweat and keep you cool with breathability are great. I like to dress to impress on and off the course. You can only make a first impression once. I feel great when I walk out the door and head to the country club in my Burberry golf clothing and seem to get a lot of comments that support my decisions. Dressing well can intimidate a competitor as well, I have had players tell me they thought when they saw me that I was a good golfer before I even stepped foot on the first tee. If you can get them thinking before you hit a shot that is a plus.

  3. Ron

    Jun 24, 2008 at 3:21 pm

    It’s not mentioned but much of the new fashion is driven by the use of technical fabrics that keep you cooler, dryer and more comfortable like the Adidas ClimaCool and Nike Dry-fit stuff. It’s much more comfortable. I actually don’t ski or golf in cotton anymore. I wouldn’t wear some of my stuff on a local muni course, but it’s not uncommon at all on my club course.

  4. Ryan

    Jun 23, 2008 at 9:36 pm

    I am very offended with the way people address the styles out on tour. I beleive that Camilo, Sergio, Jesper, Badds, alls these guys are trend setters. Any Jo Blow can go out in a Blue Shirt, Khaki Pants and a black belt. It takes style and balls to go out and make a statement not only with your clothes but with your clothes. How good is the marketing and advertising for these players, people are always talking about Poulter, well how many clubs has Cobra sold since they got him on staff, “LOTS!” I am a very stylish golfer and I am the type of person who cant play good unless I look good. Just my .02 cents!

  5. Mike

    Jun 23, 2008 at 1:07 pm

    You know what they say – when in rome, be like the romans. If you’re playing on the local 9 hole, a t-shirt and cargo pants are probably fine. Playing at the premier muni/country club, best be wearing your polo and khakis. I would probably say cutoff/sleeveless shirts are always unacceptable though. Have a bit of class, at least.

  6. Paul

    Jun 21, 2008 at 10:20 pm

    To each their own as it has been said before, and as far as the LPGA is concerned, Thank the lord they got some “fashion” out there. To me it is better to be the guy with his collard shirt untucked taking your 20.00 bucks than the guy who looks and plays so uptight that he can’t get comfortable.

  7. alex

    Jun 21, 2008 at 1:11 pm

    just wanted to make a comment on what Tim Schoch had written … if anyone is an idiot its your self sir, and i say this with as much respect as i possibly can. as a golf professional my self and a “regular” golfer there are trends in golf and it are visible in fashion to even equipment and in many more aspects in this great game. so my dear tim was gary player ben hogan arnold palmer and walter hagan all idiots when they wore clothing items with color or started their own trends and still managed to look sharp on the course in this great game that we play, even thought their styles were not the “norm”
    oh and tim ever head of to each their own time to grow up and be a true gentleman of the game we cherish. and just hope to see you at my muni maybe you will be the comic relief for my staff if they see you in your faded shirt and knee high kaki shorts not that there is anything wrong with that

  8. Peter

    Jun 20, 2008 at 4:19 pm

    I’ll keep saying it.. the word golf is not a verb.

    Golf and personal presentation are historical partners. We have a situation now where golf is trying to reach the greater population – motivation being the marketing dollar.
    If we want golf to retain some aspect of the idea that it is good to strive to be better (an idea not unsuitable for a large portion of the population), then it must require some degree of standard of its participants. Whether this be dress, language, behavior – can any of that actually be detrimental for an individual?

  9. Jim

    Jun 20, 2008 at 12:09 pm

    Are we that boring of a society that we have to be negative about people wanting to express their style and individuality? It just goes to show that those who cant accept fashion on the golf course have little or no self confidence, and realize that they could never pull off such a look. Villegas and Poulter are two of the best dressed players on tour and are often featured in global fashion magazines for that very reason. When is the last time you saw Davis Love, Vijay Singh, or Phil Mickelson in GQ or Details? If style and fashion from the younger tour players helps promote the game, its pretty narrow-minded to be critical.

  10. Chris

    Jun 19, 2008 at 6:38 pm

    I think golf is ready for the change that is here. Remember not long ago Aspen would not let a snowboard on the mountain, yet the X Games were just held there. Change = Progression. Now I do not believe in the “trash the course with your golf cart” guy that is more interested in a drunken stuper that sinking a long putt. But who wants to wear their grandpa’s shirt just because the course says you need a collar? Have your own style and bring it to the course. Follow the rules but never conform…unless of course you just like to be a follower. In that case you just don’t “get it” anyway. Check out 13thgreen.com Your Source Fore Style On The Course. HAVE SOME STYLE!!

  11. Tim Schoch

    Jun 18, 2008 at 10:28 am

    When I golf, I don’t give a second thought to making a fashion statement. I always dress neatly and appropriately, not a sweat-pants kind of guy. I can’t believe that clothing fashion is on any “regular” golfer’s mind.

    As a TV viewer of pro golf, I think the pros look like idiots if they wear runway freaky outfits, then don’t make the cut. And I’m referring to the LPGA, as well, which has gotten out of hand.

    In my experience, if someone is a true golfer and respects the game, they will dress appropriately. If you add the “look-at-me” factor, then you’ll get the vain golfers who look like NASCAR race cars and titters behind their backs.

    IMO, the fashion show is on TV. If you insist on being the show at your muni, you only end up being comic relief.

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Whats in the Bag

Peter Malnati WITB 2021 (May)

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Driver: Titleist TSi3 (9 degrees) (A1 hosel setting, SureFit weight H2)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Blue 6 X

3-wood: Titleist TSi3 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD IZ 7 X

Hybrid: Titleist 818 H2 (19 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI 85 X

Utility: Titleist U500 (4, 23 degrees)
Shaft: True Temper AMT X100

Irons: Titleist T100 (5-9)
Shafts: True Temper AMT X100

Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM8 (45-10F, 52-12F, 56-12D, 62-08M)
Shafts: True Temper Tour AMT (45, 52), True Temper Tour Issue S400 (56, 62)

Putter: Scotty Cameron Studio Select Fastback 1.5

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

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Whats in the Bag

Phil Mickelson WITB 2021 (May – Wells Fargo Championship)

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Driver: Callaway Mavrik Sub Zero (8 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Black 6 X (@47.5 inches)

2-wood: TaylorMade “Original One” Mini Driver
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Black 7 X

4-wood: Callaway Mavrik Sub Zero (16.5 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Blue 8 X

Irons: Callaway X-Forged UT (16), Callaway X21 UT Proto (19 degrees @20.5, 25), Callaway Apex MB ‘21 (small groove) (6-PW)
Shafts: (16) MCA MMT 105 TX (4-PW) KBS Tour V 125 S+

**(Callaway X-Forged 16 degree driving iron also in the bag and could be rotated in)**

Wedges: Callaway PM Grind ’19 “Raw” ([email protected], [email protected], 60-12)
Shafts: KBS Tour-V 125 S+

Putter: Odyssey Milled Blade “Phil Mickelson”
Grip: SuperStroke Pistol GT Tour

Ball: Callaway Chrome Soft X w/Triple Track

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Equipment

A closer look at Bryson DeChambeau’s low-lofted fairway wood

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Editor’s note: We filed this piece for PGATour.com’s Equipment Report

This week’s Wells Fargo Championship is Bryson DeChambeau’s first start since the Masters. DeChambeau, who’s won twice this season, is always experimenting, so it should be no surprise that he was seen on the range this week with a unique club built specifically to handle the tremendous swing speed he creates.

The new club is a custom Cobra RadSpeed Big Tour Proto B fairway wood. The ‘B’ stands for Bryson. It only has 10.5 degrees of loft – the same amount as some players’ drivers — with a fixed long hosel. The standard RadSpeed features an adjustable hosel to change the lie and loft.

The original Cobra Baffler was built in the 1980s as one of golf’s first utility clubs. The rails were designed to help the head glide through the turf.

On Dechambeau’s club, the signature Cobra Baffler railed sole has been modified to have the rails towards the front of the head, closer to the face. The club also has an adjustable weight in the sole.

“We started with a custom head and I added small rails via welding after the fact,” said Cobra tour manager Ben Schomin. “(The club) worked OK before rails and much better after thanks to improved strike consistency with the rails.”

Read the full piece at PGATour.com.

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