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What’s Your Golf Style?

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Recently I’ve been involved in a few discussions about golf style. As the game has become more accessible and gained more mainstream popularity, the dress code has definitely been interpreted in new ways. Of course private and municipal courses have different standards and some have no real dress code at all. Today’s golfer is a mix of traditionalists and those with a more casual approach. A few things keep coming up in style conversations:

Bright colors – a la Camilo Villegas or Ian Poulter: Some are quite offended by the Columbian-born golfer’s style. Often wearing brightly colored coordinates with large belt buckles, he’s been called gaudy more than once. Others think he’s got a progressive, modern style.

Cargo shorts – like at your municipal course: These shorts can look more like “shants” (almost a short but closer to a pant) and tend to be a bit sloppy. The more tailored cargo with a smart shirt can look really nice though. On the other hand, who really cares when you’re just playing at the local 9 hole?

Shirts without collars – for men or women: Again, if you’re just at the range or cheap muni it probably doesn’t matter. I’ve seen some get very upset at Michelle Wie for sporting a tank and others who think you should golf in what is comfortable.

Sweat pants or gym clothes in general: Some think this is acceptable at the range but many purists seem to think this is a no-no in any situation.

Sneakers on the course instead of golf shoes: I’m pretty sure you can’t do this at many of the private clubs so it’s a non-issue. At the range or muni it probably doesn’t matter to most.

Old school – as in loud plaids or plus fours: Payne Stewart pulled off the old school style nicely. I’ve seen some great throwback plaids but some find them to be tacky.

Most of the “travesties” of fashion are committed at the more laid-back public courses. I’ve seen very mellow courses where there’s only one guy decked out in the Ashworth gear and he stands out like a sore thumb and gets stared at. I’ve also seen someone wearing a golf shirt and shoes with jeans get the stink eye. Each course I go to seems to have a distinct golf style of its own.

What’s your golf style? Are you a purist or do you throw on whatever is clean?

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11 Comments

11 Comments

  1. Jesse

    Oct 23, 2008 at 6:47 pm

    Syle in golf is huge. In my mind the better you look, the more confident you will be, and the better you will play. You don’t have to go extreme with some of the color combos that Camilo wears, but NOT always wearing a cotton striped shirt and khaki shorts or pants is good. Tech fabrics are huge right now with some styles that don’t scream middle age weekend golfer. Bright colors are great. Shorts and pants that are different than black, navy, or khaki can really add to your style like a plaid, yellow, light blue, white, or green paired with an appropriate solid colored or patterned, not stiped, shirt looks great. Model your style similar to most of the younger or clothing sponsored players on tour, they have people telling them what to wear!!!

  2. Adam

    Jun 26, 2008 at 1:18 am

    In fashion as with almost anything “Take Change by the Hand or it will Take You by the Throat.” Keep moving forward I for one am very pleased with the way fashion on the golf course it going. The new fabrics that wick away sweat and keep you cool with breathability are great. I like to dress to impress on and off the course. You can only make a first impression once. I feel great when I walk out the door and head to the country club in my Burberry golf clothing and seem to get a lot of comments that support my decisions. Dressing well can intimidate a competitor as well, I have had players tell me they thought when they saw me that I was a good golfer before I even stepped foot on the first tee. If you can get them thinking before you hit a shot that is a plus.

  3. Ron

    Jun 24, 2008 at 3:21 pm

    It’s not mentioned but much of the new fashion is driven by the use of technical fabrics that keep you cooler, dryer and more comfortable like the Adidas ClimaCool and Nike Dry-fit stuff. It’s much more comfortable. I actually don’t ski or golf in cotton anymore. I wouldn’t wear some of my stuff on a local muni course, but it’s not uncommon at all on my club course.

  4. Ryan

    Jun 23, 2008 at 9:36 pm

    I am very offended with the way people address the styles out on tour. I beleive that Camilo, Sergio, Jesper, Badds, alls these guys are trend setters. Any Jo Blow can go out in a Blue Shirt, Khaki Pants and a black belt. It takes style and balls to go out and make a statement not only with your clothes but with your clothes. How good is the marketing and advertising for these players, people are always talking about Poulter, well how many clubs has Cobra sold since they got him on staff, “LOTS!” I am a very stylish golfer and I am the type of person who cant play good unless I look good. Just my .02 cents!

  5. Mike

    Jun 23, 2008 at 1:07 pm

    You know what they say – when in rome, be like the romans. If you’re playing on the local 9 hole, a t-shirt and cargo pants are probably fine. Playing at the premier muni/country club, best be wearing your polo and khakis. I would probably say cutoff/sleeveless shirts are always unacceptable though. Have a bit of class, at least.

  6. Paul

    Jun 21, 2008 at 10:20 pm

    To each their own as it has been said before, and as far as the LPGA is concerned, Thank the lord they got some “fashion” out there. To me it is better to be the guy with his collard shirt untucked taking your 20.00 bucks than the guy who looks and plays so uptight that he can’t get comfortable.

  7. alex

    Jun 21, 2008 at 1:11 pm

    just wanted to make a comment on what Tim Schoch had written … if anyone is an idiot its your self sir, and i say this with as much respect as i possibly can. as a golf professional my self and a “regular” golfer there are trends in golf and it are visible in fashion to even equipment and in many more aspects in this great game. so my dear tim was gary player ben hogan arnold palmer and walter hagan all idiots when they wore clothing items with color or started their own trends and still managed to look sharp on the course in this great game that we play, even thought their styles were not the “norm”
    oh and tim ever head of to each their own time to grow up and be a true gentleman of the game we cherish. and just hope to see you at my muni maybe you will be the comic relief for my staff if they see you in your faded shirt and knee high kaki shorts not that there is anything wrong with that

  8. Peter

    Jun 20, 2008 at 4:19 pm

    I’ll keep saying it.. the word golf is not a verb.

    Golf and personal presentation are historical partners. We have a situation now where golf is trying to reach the greater population – motivation being the marketing dollar.
    If we want golf to retain some aspect of the idea that it is good to strive to be better (an idea not unsuitable for a large portion of the population), then it must require some degree of standard of its participants. Whether this be dress, language, behavior – can any of that actually be detrimental for an individual?

  9. Jim

    Jun 20, 2008 at 12:09 pm

    Are we that boring of a society that we have to be negative about people wanting to express their style and individuality? It just goes to show that those who cant accept fashion on the golf course have little or no self confidence, and realize that they could never pull off such a look. Villegas and Poulter are two of the best dressed players on tour and are often featured in global fashion magazines for that very reason. When is the last time you saw Davis Love, Vijay Singh, or Phil Mickelson in GQ or Details? If style and fashion from the younger tour players helps promote the game, its pretty narrow-minded to be critical.

  10. Chris

    Jun 19, 2008 at 6:38 pm

    I think golf is ready for the change that is here. Remember not long ago Aspen would not let a snowboard on the mountain, yet the X Games were just held there. Change = Progression. Now I do not believe in the “trash the course with your golf cart” guy that is more interested in a drunken stuper that sinking a long putt. But who wants to wear their grandpa’s shirt just because the course says you need a collar? Have your own style and bring it to the course. Follow the rules but never conform…unless of course you just like to be a follower. In that case you just don’t “get it” anyway. Check out 13thgreen.com Your Source Fore Style On The Course. HAVE SOME STYLE!!

  11. Tim Schoch

    Jun 18, 2008 at 10:28 am

    When I golf, I don’t give a second thought to making a fashion statement. I always dress neatly and appropriately, not a sweat-pants kind of guy. I can’t believe that clothing fashion is on any “regular” golfer’s mind.

    As a TV viewer of pro golf, I think the pros look like idiots if they wear runway freaky outfits, then don’t make the cut. And I’m referring to the LPGA, as well, which has gotten out of hand.

    In my experience, if someone is a true golfer and respects the game, they will dress appropriately. If you add the “look-at-me” factor, then you’ll get the vain golfers who look like NASCAR race cars and titters behind their backs.

    IMO, the fashion show is on TV. If you insist on being the show at your muni, you only end up being comic relief.

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Whats in the Bag

Garrick Higgo’s winning WITB: 2021 Palmetto Championship

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Driver: Titleist TSi3 (9 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Blue 6 X

3-wood: Titleist TSi2 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Blue  7 X

Hybrid: Titleist TSi3 (18 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Atmos HB Tour Spec Blue 8 X

Irons: Titleist T100 (4-PW)
Shafts: Project X 6.5

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design SM8 (50-12F, 56-14F, 60-06K10S)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Putter: Scotty Cameron Phantom X 5.5

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x (2021)

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Whats in the Bag

Chesson Hadley WITB 2021 (June)

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Driver: Titleist TSi3 (10.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana D+ Limited 70 TX

3-wood: Titleist TS3 (16.5 degrees, B2 Setting)
Shaft: UST Elements Gold 8F5 X

bill-haas-witb-2020

Hybrid: Titleist TSi3 (20 degrees)

Irons: Titleist 620 MB (4-9)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold AMT White Tour Issue X100 (4-9)

Wedges: Vokey SM8 (48-10F, 52-12F, 56-14F, 60-08M)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Putter: Odyssey White Hot OG 2-Ball

Grips: Golf Pride MCC

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

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Equipment

SST Pure: A deep dive into the technology

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Due to the manufacturing process, all golf shafts contain irregularities in straightness, stiffness, and roundness. And depending on how a shaft is aligned, the inconsistencies can adversely affect a shaft’s performance and consistency.

SST PURE was developed as a solution to this problem.

In simplest terms, the SST PURE (stands for it stands for Plane of Uniform REpeatability) process finds a shaft’s most stable orientation to minimizing twisting and off-line bending during the swing. This results in longer, straighter ball flight and more consistent performance in all PUREd shafts. Subjectively, PUREd shafts are often described as feeling “softer” than their non-PUREd counterparts.

For more background on SST PURE and PUREing on tour, we talked with SST founder Dick Weiss, independent rep Scott Garrison, who has the only SST Pure machine on a tour truck, and rep Arnie Cunningham.

Here’s what they had to say.

SST founder Dick Weiss

GolfWRX: Give us a 101-level overview of SST PUREing.

DW: What we do at SST is we analyze the irregularities in a shaft and based on various algorithms, various mathematic formulas, determine which is most asymmetric. Which is the one that’s causing the shaft to bend and twist out of line at impact and also in the first load – the transition between backswing and downswing, there’s a lot of movement in there also. What we do is identify that and mark it so it can be assembled into the club head.

It’s a technological development. It’s come about because we have computers today to do this. We don’t do it by eyeball. The computer doesn’t care who’s going to play it, what level of skill they have, what the material composition is of a shaft, who made it, what kind of ball you’re going to hit. That’s not what we do. What we are saying is we want to analyze a shaft to get it to perform to the best of its ability. You can take a shaft based upon irregularities in it – because shafts are not round or straight.

If you take any shaft and roll it on a table like a pool cue, you’ll see 90% of the time they’ll bounce along because they’re not round. There’s high points and low points, thicker and thinner areas. All we want to do is locate that and say, “Let’s make it work as an asset, let’s make it work as a support for a shaft so they don’t torque out or twist out at impact.”

GolfWRX: Can you give us a brief overview of exactly what goes on in the SST PUREing process?

DW: Sure. In the PUREing process, there’s approximately fifty-six steps you have to take assuming you do what we call a retro-PURE. There’s two ways to PURE. One is if you take a brand new head, a brand new shaft, PURE the shaft and assemble it into a head – that’s a brand new club. The second way would be what we call a retro-PURE. One is we take apart an existing club, keep the shaft, take the grip off, peel the tape off underneath the grip. We use our Weiss-Gibson Ultimate Extractor, we cut the ferrule off. We remove the shaft. We drill out the old epoxy in the head and acetone the head down. We then drill out any old epoxy that may be in the tip of the club. We turn down and clean the outside tip of the club if there’s any epoxy or residue from the epoxy itself where the ferrule may have been. We then go ahead and PURE the shaft. We come back and fit a ferrule, reassemble the club. We use a fast dry epoxy with shafting beads in it.

GolfWRX: Now what would you say to those who don’t believe in the SST PUREing process?

DW: In any technology, people question it which is good. People still don’t think the Earth is round. I think if they are honest with themselves – forget about Dick Weiss and SST as an entity. If they’re honest with themselves and they know anything about clubs whether they make them in their garage or professionally, they have to be able to tell that shafts can not perform the same just randomly or haphazardly assembled. Each shaft has its idiosyncrasies.

So I say for the ones that don’t believe in it, do a test yourself without any type of process. Take a club out, hit it, bring it back in, try to stay off the quadrants, 90 degrees left, 180, another 90, that’s not the way to do it. Move it 30 degrees to the left or right. Put it back in and go hit it. Flip the plane upside down, put it back in, and go hit it.

We’ve started doing a lot of internal testing is because everyone says, “Let us see some independent testing.” We said okay and did it. We took the tour van and five workers with us. We used clubs I hadn’t seen. They came from tour. We didn’t look for asymmetric products. We just took what was there, new shafts, new heads, some of the heads I’ve never seen before. It doesn’t make any difference. We’re happy to subject it to any tests.

Scott E Garrison

“Studies have shown the irregularities in shafts, and that causes offline shots. If you play pool at a bar, you’re going to take the straightest queue.”

GolfWRX: How do you showcase the benefits of SST PUREing when players visit your truck?

SEG: When I have a player in the truck, and I do a quick demonstration and put a shaft in the machine, within two minutes, they’re in…they’re hooked.

All the OEMs, they’re seeing their players want this done, so we’re PUREing up shafts and getting them back to [their trucks] so they can build PUREd clubs for their players.

GolfWRX: What performance examples can you give us where a player PUREd his shafts and saw tremendous improvement?

SEG: It was about seven years ago when I just finished re-gripping Ben Martin’s putter with a SuperStroke grip. As he was leaving, I asked him if he had ever had his clubs PUREd. He said, “No, but I had heard about it and was curious.” I showed him a set I was in the middle of PUREing and he was sold. It was Monday morning, the week of the RBC Heritage and it was pouring. He said to PURE his entire set. That’s what I did Monday afternoon. I ripped his gamers apart and PUREd the shafts and put them back together (a retro-PURE). He was leading the tournament, he shot a career-low round and finished third. He told me later how much better his mis-hits were.

Arnie Cunningham

GolfWRX: What’s the most obvious benefit of PUREing?

AC: It’s about dispersion patterns. Until a person can really dive deep into the numbers—and we’ve done it throughout the years at Golf Laboratories and its proved over and over that the dispersion pattern is better PUREd vs not.

GolfWRX: Are there any misconceptions about PUREing?

AC: Detractors might be looking for some miracle feel, but really, it’s about the dispersion and an improvement on the already good technology in shafts.

GolfWRX: Tell us about the USGA restrictions on PUREing.

AC: You’re stabilizing the golf shaft. You’re putting it in the best playing position possible. If you PURE a shaft, by USGA rules, you can not turn that shaft to allow for a draw or a cut. Just that rule tells me they know it works because they’ve tested and they’ve seen the difference in performance.

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