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What’s Your Golf Style?

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Recently I’ve been involved in a few discussions about golf style. As the game has become more accessible and gained more mainstream popularity, the dress code has definitely been interpreted in new ways. Of course private and municipal courses have different standards and some have no real dress code at all. Today’s golfer is a mix of traditionalists and those with a more casual approach. A few things keep coming up in style conversations:

Bright colors – a la Camilo Villegas or Ian Poulter: Some are quite offended by the Columbian-born golfer’s style. Often wearing brightly colored coordinates with large belt buckles, he’s been called gaudy more than once. Others think he’s got a progressive, modern style.

Cargo shorts – like at your municipal course: These shorts can look more like “shants” (almost a short but closer to a pant) and tend to be a bit sloppy. The more tailored cargo with a smart shirt can look really nice though. On the other hand, who really cares when you’re just playing at the local 9 hole?

Shirts without collars – for men or women: Again, if you’re just at the range or cheap muni it probably doesn’t matter. I’ve seen some get very upset at Michelle Wie for sporting a tank and others who think you should golf in what is comfortable.

Sweat pants or gym clothes in general: Some think this is acceptable at the range but many purists seem to think this is a no-no in any situation.

Sneakers on the course instead of golf shoes: I’m pretty sure you can’t do this at many of the private clubs so it’s a non-issue. At the range or muni it probably doesn’t matter to most.

Old school – as in loud plaids or plus fours: Payne Stewart pulled off the old school style nicely. I’ve seen some great throwback plaids but some find them to be tacky.

Most of the “travesties” of fashion are committed at the more laid-back public courses. I’ve seen very mellow courses where there’s only one guy decked out in the Ashworth gear and he stands out like a sore thumb and gets stared at. I’ve also seen someone wearing a golf shirt and shoes with jeans get the stink eye. Each course I go to seems to have a distinct golf style of its own.

What’s your golf style? Are you a purist or do you throw on whatever is clean?

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11 Comments

11 Comments

  1. Jesse

    Oct 23, 2008 at 6:47 pm

    Syle in golf is huge. In my mind the better you look, the more confident you will be, and the better you will play. You don’t have to go extreme with some of the color combos that Camilo wears, but NOT always wearing a cotton striped shirt and khaki shorts or pants is good. Tech fabrics are huge right now with some styles that don’t scream middle age weekend golfer. Bright colors are great. Shorts and pants that are different than black, navy, or khaki can really add to your style like a plaid, yellow, light blue, white, or green paired with an appropriate solid colored or patterned, not stiped, shirt looks great. Model your style similar to most of the younger or clothing sponsored players on tour, they have people telling them what to wear!!!

  2. Adam

    Jun 26, 2008 at 1:18 am

    In fashion as with almost anything “Take Change by the Hand or it will Take You by the Throat.” Keep moving forward I for one am very pleased with the way fashion on the golf course it going. The new fabrics that wick away sweat and keep you cool with breathability are great. I like to dress to impress on and off the course. You can only make a first impression once. I feel great when I walk out the door and head to the country club in my Burberry golf clothing and seem to get a lot of comments that support my decisions. Dressing well can intimidate a competitor as well, I have had players tell me they thought when they saw me that I was a good golfer before I even stepped foot on the first tee. If you can get them thinking before you hit a shot that is a plus.

  3. Ron

    Jun 24, 2008 at 3:21 pm

    It’s not mentioned but much of the new fashion is driven by the use of technical fabrics that keep you cooler, dryer and more comfortable like the Adidas ClimaCool and Nike Dry-fit stuff. It’s much more comfortable. I actually don’t ski or golf in cotton anymore. I wouldn’t wear some of my stuff on a local muni course, but it’s not uncommon at all on my club course.

  4. Ryan

    Jun 23, 2008 at 9:36 pm

    I am very offended with the way people address the styles out on tour. I beleive that Camilo, Sergio, Jesper, Badds, alls these guys are trend setters. Any Jo Blow can go out in a Blue Shirt, Khaki Pants and a black belt. It takes style and balls to go out and make a statement not only with your clothes but with your clothes. How good is the marketing and advertising for these players, people are always talking about Poulter, well how many clubs has Cobra sold since they got him on staff, “LOTS!” I am a very stylish golfer and I am the type of person who cant play good unless I look good. Just my .02 cents!

  5. Mike

    Jun 23, 2008 at 1:07 pm

    You know what they say – when in rome, be like the romans. If you’re playing on the local 9 hole, a t-shirt and cargo pants are probably fine. Playing at the premier muni/country club, best be wearing your polo and khakis. I would probably say cutoff/sleeveless shirts are always unacceptable though. Have a bit of class, at least.

  6. Paul

    Jun 21, 2008 at 10:20 pm

    To each their own as it has been said before, and as far as the LPGA is concerned, Thank the lord they got some “fashion” out there. To me it is better to be the guy with his collard shirt untucked taking your 20.00 bucks than the guy who looks and plays so uptight that he can’t get comfortable.

  7. alex

    Jun 21, 2008 at 1:11 pm

    just wanted to make a comment on what Tim Schoch had written … if anyone is an idiot its your self sir, and i say this with as much respect as i possibly can. as a golf professional my self and a “regular” golfer there are trends in golf and it are visible in fashion to even equipment and in many more aspects in this great game. so my dear tim was gary player ben hogan arnold palmer and walter hagan all idiots when they wore clothing items with color or started their own trends and still managed to look sharp on the course in this great game that we play, even thought their styles were not the “norm”
    oh and tim ever head of to each their own time to grow up and be a true gentleman of the game we cherish. and just hope to see you at my muni maybe you will be the comic relief for my staff if they see you in your faded shirt and knee high kaki shorts not that there is anything wrong with that

  8. Peter

    Jun 20, 2008 at 4:19 pm

    I’ll keep saying it.. the word golf is not a verb.

    Golf and personal presentation are historical partners. We have a situation now where golf is trying to reach the greater population – motivation being the marketing dollar.
    If we want golf to retain some aspect of the idea that it is good to strive to be better (an idea not unsuitable for a large portion of the population), then it must require some degree of standard of its participants. Whether this be dress, language, behavior – can any of that actually be detrimental for an individual?

  9. Jim

    Jun 20, 2008 at 12:09 pm

    Are we that boring of a society that we have to be negative about people wanting to express their style and individuality? It just goes to show that those who cant accept fashion on the golf course have little or no self confidence, and realize that they could never pull off such a look. Villegas and Poulter are two of the best dressed players on tour and are often featured in global fashion magazines for that very reason. When is the last time you saw Davis Love, Vijay Singh, or Phil Mickelson in GQ or Details? If style and fashion from the younger tour players helps promote the game, its pretty narrow-minded to be critical.

  10. Chris

    Jun 19, 2008 at 6:38 pm

    I think golf is ready for the change that is here. Remember not long ago Aspen would not let a snowboard on the mountain, yet the X Games were just held there. Change = Progression. Now I do not believe in the “trash the course with your golf cart” guy that is more interested in a drunken stuper that sinking a long putt. But who wants to wear their grandpa’s shirt just because the course says you need a collar? Have your own style and bring it to the course. Follow the rules but never conform…unless of course you just like to be a follower. In that case you just don’t “get it” anyway. Check out 13thgreen.com Your Source Fore Style On The Course. HAVE SOME STYLE!!

  11. Tim Schoch

    Jun 18, 2008 at 10:28 am

    When I golf, I don’t give a second thought to making a fashion statement. I always dress neatly and appropriately, not a sweat-pants kind of guy. I can’t believe that clothing fashion is on any “regular” golfer’s mind.

    As a TV viewer of pro golf, I think the pros look like idiots if they wear runway freaky outfits, then don’t make the cut. And I’m referring to the LPGA, as well, which has gotten out of hand.

    In my experience, if someone is a true golfer and respects the game, they will dress appropriately. If you add the “look-at-me” factor, then you’ll get the vain golfers who look like NASCAR race cars and titters behind their backs.

    IMO, the fashion show is on TV. If you insist on being the show at your muni, you only end up being comic relief.

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Equipment rewind: A deep dive into the Cleveland HiBore driver legacy

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I have always been fascinated by product development, specifically the development of unconventional products. Now in the world of golf clubs, one of the most unconventional designs ever introduced was the Cleveland HiBore driver, which during its lifespan, experienced tremendous success through a number of generations, including the HiBore XL, XLS, and finally, the Monster XLS, which, as you may remember, hid the acronym “MOI” on the sole, alluding to its massive level of forgiveness.

As a golfer, I played the original HiBore, along with the XL Tour for a period of time and was always curious about the story behind the “scooped out crown.” In a search for answers, I reached out to Cleveland-Srixon to get the lowdown on the HiBore and discuss where it sits in the pantheon of drivers.

Ryan Barath: Considering how engineers are continuing to do everything they can to increase MOI and push the center of gravity low and deep in driver heads, it feels like the original HiBore and the subsequent models were well ahead of their time from a design perspective. 

It makes logical sense the best way to save weight from the crown is to make the crown “disappear” compared to traditionally shaped drivers, am I correct in assuming that?

Cleveland design team: You nailed it.

At the time of the HiBore, there were really only two solutions to create a low and deep center of gravity:

    1. Make the crown lighter – by either replacing the crown with a lighter-weight material such as a graphite composite or magnesium or by thinning out the material on the crown. Thinner crowns were possible thanks to advances in casting technology and using etching techniques to remove material.
    2. Make the driver shallower – this change in geometry created a very forgiving low profile design, but the downside to this was that you ended up with a very small face that looked intimidating compared to the larger-faced drivers on the market.

The HiBore took a new approach and inverted the crown geometry so that all the crown weight was moved lower. By inverting the crown the HiBore design allowed for a very long and flat sole, therefore there was space in the head that was really low and deep to put the weight.

The HiBore was really the first driver to eliminate, or nearly eliminate the tapered skirt. Almost every modern driver in the market is inspired by the HiBore in that respect. It was a two-part solution where we lowered the weight of the crown and simultaneously created a low/deep location to put any extra mass.

The lower and deeper CG of the HiBore improved launch conditions significantly, but also made the driver much more consistent across the entire face. The deep CG increased MOI resulting in tighter dispersion since the sweet spot was in the center of the face. Misses both low and high performed exceptionally as opposed to having a small hot spot high on the face.

RB: In every conversation I have ever had with engineers, there is always this give-and-take mentality from a design perspective to get to the final iteration. Was there anything that was given up or sacrificed for overall performance with this design?

Cleveland design team: The hardest part about the HiBore design was the sound. Prior to the HiBore, internal ribbing in a hollow golf club head was nearly unheard of. To make the HiBore sound acceptable, we had to design a ribbing structure to control the sound and design an entirely new manufacturing process to produce those internal ribs. To this day, most drivers include some form of internal ribbing to control sound or improve ball speed and that ribbing technology can be traced back to the HiBore.

In terms of tradeoffs, the major one was the low spin nature of the driver made it more difficult for low spin players to use. If a golfer is already low spin, this club would be too low and drives would just fall out of the air. Low spin golfers tend to be low spin because they hit the ball high on the face. Since we lowered the sweet spot, a high face impact was further from the sweet spot so ball speed fell as compared to a higher CG driver. Fortunately for us, in that era most golfers were fighting too much spin or way too much spin, this wasn’t a real issue.

RB: Do you have any final words on the HiBore drivers and the legacy they have left behind?

Cleveland design team: We are very proud of the HiBore driver family and the success it had at the time, but we are also proud of its legacy.

In the same way that you can trace nearly every modern band back to the Beatles or Led Zeppelin, you can trace nearly every modern driver back to HiBore either through the internal structure that is prolific across modern drivers, or the long, flat sole that is a must-have in a high-performance driver.

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Coolest thing for sale in the GolfWRX Classifieds (04/03/21): Tiger Woods spec’d irons

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At GolfWRX, we love golf, plain and simple.

We are a community of like-minded individuals who all experience and express our enjoyment of the game in many ways. It’s that sense of community that drives day-to-day interactions in the forums on topics that range from best driver to what marker you use to mark your ball. It even allows us to share another thing, including equipment or, in this case, a sweet set of irons!

Currently, in our GolfWRX buy/sell/trade (BST) forum, there is a listing for Tiger Woods spec’d TaylorMade P7TW irons, or as they are also known: the GOAT irons.

To check out the full listing in our BST forum, head through the link: TaylorMade P7TW **TIGER SPECS* 3-PW

This is the most impressive current listing from the GolfWRX BST, and if you are curious about the rules to participate in the BST Forum you can check them out here: GolfWRX BST Rules.

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Edel introduces moveable weight Swing Match wedges for 2021

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The 2021 Edel Swing Match wedges are taking the concept of custom fit wedges to a level that has never been brought to the short game before, with the goal to use every possible tool to tighten dispersion and consistency to help you shoot lower scores.

The new Edel Swing Match wedges utilize a movable weight system in the flange to fit each club to a golfer’s natural short game swing profile. The research indicates that once properly fit, everything from mechanics to launch conditions shows measurable improvement.

Edel Swing Match wedges: The why

It’s no secret the best way to properly optimize your equipment is through custom fitting. When it comes to wedges, the only factors that have been traditionally accounted for are length, lie, loft, and grind—all of which, beyond grind, are already standard for iron fittings.

With how specialized wedges have to be for performance, is grind really the only thing golfers should be concerned with?

At Edel golf, they set out to answer this question, and they came away with “no,” which lead to the development of the Swing Match system to help every golfer achieve their maximum potential.

The backbone of Swing Match weighting philosophy is that a wedge’s weight location has a dramatic effect on how a golfer creates dynamics leading to impact. It’s no different than how a change in shaft weight of a driver can change impact location and delivery numbers.

The how

The weighting technology allows each golfer to adjust their wedge in order to match their natural swing profile and release motion. Edel breaks these profiles into three major categories which are

  • Cover – A steeper approach to impact
  • Side On – A neutral approach
  • Under – A shallow approach to impact

Once the heaviest weight in the wedge has been moved to the optimal position, it works alongside a player’s swing to optimize short game performance.

Results demonstrated that 80 percent of the golfers who were tested saw their best spin numbers and delivery were created with the weight adjusted somewhere other than the center weight port, and the average increase in backspin was just over 10 percent from the lowest spinning location to the highest location of the weight.

Edel’s research and testing have been analyzed by Mike Duffey, a PhD Biomechanics at Penn State and golf swing Biomechanist who came to the following conclusions: 

  • There is a substantial improvement in a player’s ability to control the flight of a wedge with weighting that matches – or is correctly fit – to the swing.
  • The type of weighting that works best varies for individual golfers. The initial assessment of the data clearly showed that there are no consistent trends across golfers showing that one single weighting always works best for each golfer. In fact, the same weighting may have nearly the opposite effect on ball flight control depending on individual swing characteristics.

It was with this knowledge that the design team at Edel developed the Swing Match weight fitting system and now they are ready to introduce it to golfers.

The Construction

The Swing Match wedges are forged from soft 1025 carbon steel and have all of the bounce and sole geometries CNC machined to ensure maximum precision wedge to wedge.

Like other Edel wedges of the past, they feature full-face groove coverage as well as a micro-engraved face texture to maximize friction for increased spin.

Another signature design element of the Swing Match wedges is their shorter hosel to precisely locate the center of gravity.

The grinds

The Swing Match wedges come in four unique grind options with each one designed specifically for a specific player delivery—much like the adjustable weight system.

It’s easy to spot the grind type on the back of each wedge, but there is one thing you won’t find and that is bounce number—here’s why:

“Typical bounce is an arbitrary number called “effective bounce” that really has no standard and is played loosely across the industry. That’s why you won’t see a bounce number on our wedges.” – Edel Golf

  • C-Grind: This grind is optimal for golfers with a moderate to shallow angle of attack who take a smaller divot. The extra sole width allows you extreme versatility for bunker play and greenside shots in the higher lofts; while being able to work in all turf conditions in the lower lofts.
  • T-Grind:  A tri-angle sole grind utilizing an extremely high bounce leading-edge, followed by a crescent-shaped lower bounce surface, and extreme heel relief. These three surfaces allow you to open the face without increasing the effective bounce for better performance on tighter lies.
  • V-Grind:  Inspired by Edel’s most popular DVR grind, this sole is great for cover golfers with a steeper swing motion. The higher bounce angle closer to the leading edge allows the sole to engage with the turf quickly which results in minimal hesitation through sand or turf.
  • D-Grind: This high bounce grind is optimal for on-top golfers with a steep angle of attack who take a larger divot. The channel in the midsole creates two separate bounce surfaces; the high bounce leading edge to cut through the turf at impact without resistance and the extremely high bounce on the second surface to prevent any excessive digging.

Price, specs, and availability

The new Edel Swing Match wedge will be available starting April 2, with the retail price of $199 for a stock wedge with Nippon Modus wedge shaft and Golf Pride grip, while custom wedge will start at $225 with customizable hand-stamping and paint fill.

The wedges will be available in lofts 48, 50, 52, 54, 56, 58, and 60 degrees in all four grind options and come in a cream chrome finish.

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