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Confessions of a Golf Ho

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You know what I’m talking about. That golfer you know that can’t ever seem to find that perfect club. Personally, I can hit all of my clubs straight and as far as I should. My philosophy is to not fix what isn’t broken. Someone very close to me feels differently. I wanted to get to the bottom of this behavior so I asked that they tell me what the big deal was:

“Ever feel like clubs are to golfer as women were to Wilt Chamberlain – there is always another one out there? I am on a current club binge and honestly do not see the end as long as there are new products every three months. Why the 90 days you might ask? Well, that is the time I have to play a club and be tempted by another companies advertising and claims. Or, the hardest of all is the feedback and debates brought up on this very site without losing a dime of my purchase. I approach each trade with the guilt of a bad break up knowing I have left the signs of a traded club on the rack. Whether it be the matching grip or the lead tape, there’s an anxiety that goes when parting with what was once hope. There is guilt, but once I think of the unbelievable profits these companies make it is easier to find fault when the club does not deliver. I’m not biased to one particular club, but I do find comfort in my irons and will trade a wood or driver in a heartbeat. I would like to strike out at the endless options of shafts that have left me wanting that perfect combo and even when happy thirst for more. Now, I have a new fairway wood and driver on order and I think these could be keepers. Wow! I just lied, so it will be Christmas again this month without the long return line.”

Hmm…I guess it is just a matter of preference. I know that I’m not alone and am more advanced than many of my golfer pals. For instance, my irons are only about a year old and the set I had before that didn’t even last a year. I did trade my driver a few times before settling on this one. Since my clubs are working I will wait until they aren’t anymore. I know some golfers that have had the same clubs for years and years. That I can’t do. I know my game and technology will keep improving.

What kind of golfer are you? Do you stick with a club until the bitter end? Do you get every new club that comes out?

 

 

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6 Comments

6 Comments

  1. Nick Messi

    Mar 22, 2014 at 4:36 pm

    I play tennis once a week and for the last 5 years have only used 2 different racquets.
    But golf is a different monster all together. In the last 5 years :
    6 iron sets
    4 drivers
    5 hybrids
    6 putters
    3 fairway woods
    3 buggies
    2 bags
    8 wedges
    In hindsight this is just nuts.
    Obsessive compulsive silly behaviour (that I always seem to logically and prudently justify without fail every single time !!)
    Every time I say to myself that this purchase will be the last I always seem yo be tempted just one more time…and sooner rather than later.
    H E L P !!!!

  2. Roy Perry

    Dec 17, 2012 at 2:16 pm

    ^^
    I wouldn’t say that we are “hacks”. You just said that you’ve been clean for only 12 months, so are you a recovering hack :). As for me, I had a set of irons given to my by my dad that he bought new in 1994. I was introduced to the game late at about 25 years old (12 years ago) and I played those old Callaway Hawkeye’s along with an Orlimar driver, woods, and hybrids, purespin wedges and a Ben Hogan Bettinardi putter. Two years ago, I traded everything minus wedges and putter and dropped for a FT (08) iron set, and FT-iz driver, woods, and hybrid. Cracked the shaft in the driver THREE times and went the Diablo Octane Black tour. Loved it, but there was just something that didn’t feel just right in it. Last year, I took the forged plunge and liking the classic look of a player’s iron, I made my own mixed set of 4-6 razr x forged, and 7-9 razr x muscleback. I purchased an Adams superblack 19* hybrid that I couldn’t make go straight if I wanted to, so traded that for what I have now, a 910h 19* with the PX 6.0 shaft. For the FW wood battle, it only went from FT-iZ to Diablo, to Cleveland FL, to now my R11 ti with a PX 6.0. The driver has evolved from FT-iZ, to FT-5 (still have), to Diablo Octane Black tour (still have), and the current 910d2 with the Px 6.0. I have had my putter now for almost 10 years and bought 3 others only to go back to the one I know and love. Aside from the driver, I have been “clean” for about 9 months now and couldn’t be happier with my setup. If I could change anything, I would go from the 8620 milled Scratch wedges that I have and take the plunge to the 1018 forged in the same lofts. Who knows, maybe Santa will bring next year after I can say I’ve gone over a year :).

  3. bobby bongwater

    Jan 22, 2012 at 9:54 am

    I had to go to rehab and have been clean for nearly 12 months on getting any new clubs. My game has never been better. Not the arrow but the indian. Now I laugh at club ho’s. They are all hacks.

  4. Leonard

    Jan 11, 2012 at 3:49 am

    I’m curious as to why different clubs give different feels. For me it’s all feel, and coincidentally, I prefer the feel of hitting it LONG with ease. No CLICKITY! CLACK! CLANK! Sounds. Maybe something that sounds softer? I prefer a smooth, soft transfer of power through the ball. Am I making it up? Or are different clubs made with less pure metals or metals that are less dense. Or for instance with drivers…are they HOLLOW?!? How do they make such deafening, echoeing sounds? Who knows?

  5. Tim Schoch

    Jun 16, 2008 at 4:46 pm

    The bitter end, hopefully, is a long way off, but I do love to try new wedges and drivers. My putting seems to stay the same, regardless of the club.

    What I do change a lot are golf balls. Just about the time I lose or retire a dozen, I’m ready for some fresh faces to look at. Sometimes, a box of balls will seem to last forever, and I get really irritated with them for over-staying their welcome and preventing me from getting another brand. So I give them away to some hacker and slicer, just to teach them a lesson.

    Speaking of lessons, I switch teachers, too.

  6. sneak

    Jun 13, 2008 at 11:40 am

    I have spent the last 3 years doing what you are doing and I think I have built the perfect set for me, 2200.00 in 2 weeks later, okay really I perpetuate the same thing I know in about a month those clubs will be gone and new ones will replace them. Right now I am just focusing on wedges, I feel less guilty dropping 125.00 on a wedge than what I would on a driver, although my driver has been working really well for me. I have also gone through a number of short lived relationships and breakups, not just with clubs but with women, because of golf, so I am sure they all think I need therapy.

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Whats in the Bag

Viktor Hovland’s winning WITB: 2021 Hero World Challenge

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  • Viktor Hovland what’s in the bag accurate as of the Hero World Challenge. 

Driver: Ping G425 LST (9 degrees @8.4)
Shaft: Fujikura Speeder TR 661 TX (45.5 inches, tipped 1/2 inch)

3-wood: TaylorMade SIM (15 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei Blue AV Raw 85 TX

7-wood: Ping G425 Max
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI 8 X

(Photo c/o SMS_on_Tour)

Irons: Ping i210 (4-PW) [Hovland is no longer playing the 3-iron pictured in the photo]
Shafts: KBS Tour V 120 X (4-PW)

Wedges: Ping Glide Forged Pro (50-SS, 56-SS), Titleist Vokey Design SM8 WedgeWorks (60)
Shafts: KBS Tour V 130 X

Putter: Ping PLD DS 72

Ball: Titleist Pro V1

Grips: Golf Pride MCC

 

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Whats in the Bag

Sam Burns WITB 2021 (December)

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sam burns witb 2021
  • Sam Burns what’s in the bag accurate as of the Sanderson Farms Championship. 

Driver: Callaway Epic Speed (10.5 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Blue 7 TX

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Fairway wood: Callaway Mavrik Sub Zero (17 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Black 8 X

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Hybrid: Callaway Apex UW (21 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Blue 8 X

 

 

 

Irons:Callaway Apex TCB (4-PW)
Shafts: Project X Rifle 6.5

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Wedges: Callaway Jaws MD5 (50-10S, 56-10S @55, 60-12X)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold S400 Tour Issue

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IMG_8194.jpegPutter: Odyssey O-Works Black 7S
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Ball: Callaway Chrome Soft X

Grips: Golf Pride MCC

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Equipment

A guide to buying junior golf equipment

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Junior golf equipment has come a long way in the past ten years. Gone are the days of used adult clubs that were cut down for juniors. It is fine to get a 2, or 3-year-old child started with some simple plastic clubs, but as kids get older, they need a set of golf clubs that are made with their body in mind.

Today there are several manufacturers making clubs specifically for juniors. Even with all these different types of clubs to choose from, there still are a few important things to consider when buying junior clubs. Length is the first consideration. The key is to find a set of clubs that is the right length for the junior golfer but also a set that the junior can grow with. Remember that it is all right for the junior to choke or grip down on the club. You just don’t want them to move their hands down the grip too much.

The basic rule is this: if the junior is choking down more than 1.5 to 2 inches, he or she is choking down too much. If they choke down more than 2 inches, the club is too long, and they may form habits that may be difficult to change. A set of clubs where the junior only has to grip down an inch allows them to make a normal swing at the ball and probably get two seasons out of the clubs.

Try not to let your junior play with a driver that is too long. At some point, they’re going to try and play with an adult driver before they’re ready. A driver that is too long can lead to timing problems and coming into the ball at a flat angle which makes it hard to hit the ball on the center of the face.

The next consideration is shaft flex. The main problem with the old cut-down set of golf clubs is the stiffness of the shafts. When you take 4 to 5 inches of length off a golf club, you make the shaft extremely stiff. This is the reason that junior golfers can’t hit the ball high with a cut-down set of clubs. One benefit of new junior sets is that the manufacturers are making shafts that are the right flex for a kid’s swing speed.

Using lightweight steel and graphite has made junior golf clubs more playable. The shafts of junior clubs today are so flexible that you can bend them with your hands. So check and make sure that your child’s set of clubs has a nice flexible shaft. Does your child need to be professionally fit for clubs? The general rule is that until they are 60 inches tall, they’ll be fine with a set of junior clubs from a good manufacturer.

After they reach 5 feet, experienced junior players really benefit from having each club fit for their game. The weight of the golf club is also very important to junior golfers. If the club is overly heavy, the child will struggle to take the club to the top of the backswing. The struggle to get the club back causes manipulation of the swing that will result in inconsistent shots.

A lighter club will help the junior get the club in the correct position at the top and lead to an easily repeatable swing. Just like with shaft flex, most club companies make junior clubs with lighter heads and shafts. So before you buy, just make sure you check the weight of the club and make sure it fits your junior’s age.

The size of the grip is also important. Grip size for kids is a new thought in the last few years. In the past, clubs were cut down, and any grip that fit the shaft was put on. The problem of oversized grips is the same for kids as adults. If the grip feels like a baseball bat, it’s going to change the swing mechanics.

Look for junior grips on their new set of clubs. If you’re changing grips, ask for junior grips with a core of 0.50. These thinner grips will make a difference in your kid’s game. There are now golf balls made for juniors. Here is the general rule for kids and golf balls. Most juniors swing speed is less than 80 MPH, so they can’t handle a lot of the balls on the market.

US Kids Golf makes two balls for juniors. One for kids with a swing speed less than 70 MPH and another for swing speeds around 90 MPH. These balls offer a softer core and more spin to keep the ball in the air and results in more distance. Other than US Kids, a ladies ball will help a lot of juniors that don’t produce a lot of speed.

Lastly, how many clubs does my kid need? Most experts agree that if a child starts at an early age, 4 or 5 years old, they need two clubs to start… a putter and a pitching wedge. Why a wedge instead of a driver? Because the length of the pitching wedge is short and it’s easy to get in the air. Longer clubs are obviously harder to get airborne and can lead to frustration.

As the junior progresses, add a 7 iron, then a hybrid, and then a 3-wood or driver. Those 5 clubs will get him/her through the first couple of years of golf. Once the junior has enough swing speed to make a noticeable difference in distance between irons, then they need 10 or 12 clubs in the bag. As a general rule, this usually happens around 10 years old for experienced juniors.

As adults, we realize how tough golf can be and how much the right equipment can help our games. By keeping these considerations in mind when buying junior golf equipment, you can help your junior play better golf, and more importantly, have more fun on the golf course.

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