Connect with us

Published

on

What effect does shaft weight have on your golf shots? With the help of Nippon, Coach Matt Lockey and I put it to the test in this new video.

Your Reaction?
  • 62
  • LEGIT6
  • WOW0
  • LOL2
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP2
  • OB2
  • SHANK13

Mark Crossfield has been coaching golf for more than 20 years, and has enjoyed shaping the digital golf world with fresh, original and educated videos. Basically, I am that guy from YouTube. You can connect with Mark on Periscope (4golfonline) and Snapchat (AskGolfGuru), as well through the social media accounts linked below.

11 Comments

11 Comments

  1. KK

    Jul 30, 2016 at 7:26 am

    It’s all about feel, with lighter shafts generally spinning a bit more with a bit more speed. The real problem is many golfers choose ego and show over darts-into-the-green control and scoring.

  2. Nooner

    Jul 27, 2016 at 3:25 am

    I think the length and girth of the shaft are more important in satisfaction for all involved

  3. Variable Step Patterns

    Jul 26, 2016 at 7:51 pm

    You’re talking about two shafts with variable step patterns as well. So that should be considered. Mark obviously loads the shaft different than coach. And as Mark stated he adjusted to the lighter shafts second time around. You shouldn’t have to adjust to a shaft. Your natural tendency will come out eventually. I’m willing to bet if they went with the lighter shaft they would develop different swings to compensate to get his timing right all the time to play the irons. But then he will have to compensate the rest of the bag. You should swing what ever allows you to achieve the proper shot window and dispersion and swing the same through out the bag.

    Like people have stated people need to be fit. what works for one may not work for another. Plus not having an industry standard for flex doesn’t help. DJ plays KBS Tour 120 in his wedges….that’s light for a wedge shaft…..but look at his stats…

  4. FlexVariesWithWeight

    Jul 26, 2016 at 5:43 pm

    It’s disappointing to see Mark Crossfield completely miss the fact that flex does in fact vary according to shaft weight. Even Nippon will tell you that a 950GH stiff is not equal to the 1150GH stiff in absolute flex. Looking at EI profiles, the Zelos 7 is nothing like the Modus3 shafts that Mark compared. Mark continually “emphasized” that all the shafts were stiff flex, but he just doesn’t seem to get it. So unfortunately there were a lot more variables in play here than just shaft weight.

    • Nooner

      Jul 27, 2016 at 3:27 am

      And what about MOI? He’s only swinging one middle club. I would love to see how this same test works with the PW and 3 irons

  5. Mmmmm

    Jul 26, 2016 at 3:17 pm

    What
    Was
    The
    Swingweight
    in
    Each
    Club
    Tested

  6. MB

    Jul 26, 2016 at 8:03 am

    I agree with Steve. Also I think it has to do with feel. A full swing wedge made by a pro, is different to a full swing 3i – 9i. The shaft is shorter, not generating the same speed and a greater value is put into dispersion and zooming in on target. In order to create the same feel as with X100 in their other irons they choose a shaft with the same weight but slightly softer in overall flex, adding a fraction more spinn. Feel being factor No. 1 in their priority.

  7. JG

    Jul 25, 2016 at 4:30 pm

    Great analysis! My question goes back to flex… Many tour pros use a different shaft in their irons versus their wedges with TTDG S400 being the popular wedge shaft choice. Is this just a feel thing? How would an amateur know whether they would benefit from different flex in their wedges?

    • steve

      Jul 26, 2016 at 7:35 am

      From what I understand they want a softer tip in wedges to create more spin

    • jo

      Jul 26, 2016 at 7:42 am

      Test it. Like Mark said, go to a golf shop and hit as many different weights and flex’s of shaft as you can. And instead of looking at the results, only go by ur feel to narrow down ur top three shafts. Then look at the numbers or results. I did this with my irons. Did it with the Mizuno shaft optimizer fitting system, even tho I don’t play Mizuno irons. I fully went in thinking I was going to be getting KBS tour shaft because of the hype. But after testing my top three where in order Project X 6.5, DG X100 and then KBS tour. I didn’t not like the feel of the KBS shafts at all. And the Project X shafts distance numbers were slightly longer then the DG X100 by a yrd or 2. But the feel of the DG X100s for me was way above the others for my swing which is compact, short and aggressive. All and all no one person can tell u ur shaft weight and flex, you need to go out and feel the perfect shaft for you.

    • Alex

      Jul 26, 2016 at 3:01 pm

      The s400 is heavier than the x100 so it gives the feeling of fractionally more control with the s400 wedge shafts. Thats the main reason why the s400 is more sought after is the weight. But there are a few outliers i.e. Rory McIlroy who uses PX 7.0 in his irons and PX 6.5 in his wedges. The 7.0 weighs more but is also stiffer, so he choose the lighter but not quite as stiff shaft in his wedges. To answer your question, most off the rack wedges come with DG s200 aka “Wedge Flex” These shafts are plenty heavy enough for I would say >90% of golfers. For most people I would say start with the s200 and work you way down to a lighter shaft.

Leave a Reply

Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Podcasts

The 19th Hole Episode 170: Grassroots golf and Darius Rucker

Published

on

Host Michael Williams talks about the benefits of grassroots golf programs in growing the game. Also features a reboot of his exclusive interview with Hootie and the Blowfish.

Your Reaction?
  • 0
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: Have a ‘Plan B’

Published

on

One of the things that I think is very interesting and fun about this game is that there are a number of ways to play every hole you encounter. And sometimes a hole offers “better” ways to play it than you might think. Let me explain with a couple of experiences from my own golf life.

ONE. In my thirties and forties, I played at a club outside of San Antonio – Fair Oaks Ranch. The 18th hole was a tough par 4 with a very small landing area and a gaping bunker at about 175 out. The skinny fairway left of that bunker wasn’t more than 15 yards wide, and there was a little mott of trees on the green side of the bunker that you would have to carry with your mid-iron bunker approach. Tough, to say the least.

That hole drove most of us nuts, and double bogeys were more common than birdies, for sure. Par was always a great score and bogey wasn’t “bad” at all.

So, one day it hit me that if I hit 4-wood off the tee, I would have an elevated fairway look at the green from about 200-210, giving me another soft 4-wood or 3-iron to the green, and the fairway was about 40 yards wide back there. Being a good long club player, I began to play the hole that way. Doubles disappeared entirely, pars became the norm and I even made the occasional birdie. Hmm.

TWO. At my recent club, the ninth hole just didn’t fit my eye or my game. I play a fade off the tee most of the time and turning over a draw was just not reliable for me at the time. That ninth is a dogleg left, with a bunker on the right side of the fairway that runs from about 160-125 from the green, right where the prime driving area is. What makes this hole so tough for me is that the prevailing wind is left to right, and trees just 60-100 yards off the tee keep me from starting the ball out left and letting it ride the breeze. This is another one where birdies are rare for me there, and bogies and doubles way too frequent. So, it dawned on me one day, finally, that I could hit 4-wood right at that bunker and not get to it, leaving me a 5- or 6-iron into the green, rather than the short iron the rare proper drive would leave me. So, that became my new strategy on that hole. I’m a good mid-iron player, so I’m fine with that, and that damn fairway bunker never caught me again.

THREE. My new club puts a premium on accurate wedge play. Most of the shorter holes have the smallest greens I’ve ever seen, so distance control with your wedge approaches is critical. And I find that reasonably full-swing wedges are easier to control distance than those awkward 60- to 80-yard partial swings. So, I’ve learned to put a premium on club selection off the tee on those holes to leave my approach shots in the 85-115 range, so that I can “dial in” my approach shotmaking.

My point in all this is that sometimes a hole gets under your skin or just doesn’t set up well for your game. When that happens, design yourself a Plan ‘B,’ and change the way you play it, at least for a while. Quite often you will find a solution to a problem and your scores and attitude will improve.

Your Reaction?
  • 98
  • LEGIT17
  • WOW3
  • LOL2
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP2
  • OB0
  • SHANK4

Continue Reading

Club Junkie

Club Junkie: Mizuno T-22 wedge and Cuater Moneymaker shoes review!

Published

on

Mizuno’s new T-22 wedges are forged from the same 1025 carbon steel with boron as the irons, giving them an extremely soft feel. Very versatile, the sole grinds allow for hitting any shot your heart desires.

The Cuater Moneymaker shoes might be some of the most comfortable I have worn in years. Tons of cushioning, exceptional traction all over the course, and they are even waterproof!

Your Reaction?
  • 1
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK3

Continue Reading

Trending