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Photos of Cobra prototype irons made for Bryson DeChambeau

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News came on Tuesday that amateur standout Bryson DeChambeau entered the 2016 RBC Heritage as a professional, and signed deals with Cobra-Puma (apparel/equipment) and Bridgestone (golf ball).

Although Cobra-Puma reported DeChambeau will play the RBC Heritage with his familiar Edel prototype irons, we spotted single-length Cobra King CB and MB prototype irons made for him, while live at the event.

We do not know if and when these irons will go into play, or if these are the same irons he reportedly played at the 2016 Georgia Cup. But check out more photos of the prototype Cobra irons below.

See what GolfWRX members are saying about the irons here.

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See what GolfWRX members are saying about the irons here.

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28 Comments

28 Comments

  1. Tour Pro

    Jun 9, 2016 at 6:26 am

    No OEM will ever release a single length set. At best it will be a “custom option” if its ever offered.

  2. Matt Vernot

    Apr 18, 2016 at 10:37 am

    These are really interesting. In comparing these side by side with his Edel set, there is no external weight on these. Cobra’s R&D department must have done an exceptional job to get the weight into the head (probably the toe side) and making them look “normal”

  3. Bruce Gerhold

    Apr 16, 2016 at 11:35 am

    Reply to “lost in the convo”. I fabricated and play a set of “2 length” irons: 2 length because of difficulty with large weight adjustments required when using off the shelf iron heads. My 3,4,5,6 irons are 37 inches long and my 7,8,9,PW are 36 inches long. Love the simplicity – one swing and 2 different ball positions covers all irons; play much better.
    1. single length irons, and 2 length irons require lie adjustment assigning a lie to each club length. Note minimal lie adjustment (small changes) when using 2 lengths.
    2. The notion of loosing length with lon g irons is a myth propagated by those taking our $ for old style irons. I hit my 3 iron 195 and my PW 105 which is very similar to old style irons.
    The science (new term for golf clubs) is : at club-ball impact, MOMENTUM is conserved. Momentum – ( head mass) x (head velocity). Now, my 3 iron is 2 inches shorter than standard (about 5%) which costs 5% head velocity. BUT the club head is 21 g heavier which is 8.6% higher than old style heads. Thus, the momentum transfer to the ball – think ball velocity – actually increases with same length or 2 length irons. YOU DO NOT SACRIFICE DISTANCE OR SUFFER FROM SMALL DISTANCE INCREMENTS BETWEEN IRONS.
    As a bonus, the shorter clubs help you make solid strikes for added consistency and length.

    • jeff

      Apr 17, 2016 at 10:22 pm

      momentum is MV^2

    • Hawk

      Apr 19, 2016 at 8:54 am

      All the research I’ve ever done on this has always showed one thing in regards to length of club in irons. Since most irons use a .5″ increment that translates into less than 2 yard distance in length between clubs. So really if all the clubs were the same exact loft and one the length was different you would increase or decrease distance by 2 yards for every .5″ difference in length. Loft however; has a much higher difference in distance, which is why same length clubs with proper loft gaps works!

      As always though all the clubs have to be the same exact weight, head weight, shaft, grip, swing weight, and so forth for the same length shaft to actually work properly. This is also the reason why you can’t make a set unless you buy custom heads and shafts.

  4. Chuck D

    Apr 15, 2016 at 3:14 am

    I recently saw Ping Scottsdale’s selling for $299 in Torrance California at a shop called Golf Exchange.

  5. :-p

    Apr 15, 2016 at 3:08 am

    I would like to touch those irons, just once :-ppppp

  6. Eye4golf

    Apr 13, 2016 at 11:28 pm

    Does anyone know where I can find selling prices for a old Scottsdale PO box ping putter , I own one and want to see what it’s worth? Kushin model.

  7. Matty

    Apr 13, 2016 at 12:16 pm

    I have a question about single-length irons. Does the offset have to be constant throughout, or should there be small changes in offset?

    • Scott

      Apr 13, 2016 at 3:16 pm

      Tom Wishon’s site has some good information on that. Tom has a set designed to be single length.

    • nathan

      Apr 13, 2016 at 5:04 pm

      All the clubs should have the same offset. Not sure why Tom’s set varies the offset from club to club.

      • Teaj

        Apr 13, 2016 at 6:40 pm

        +1 as I believe offset is to help with the squaring of the club of a longer moment.

    • WillThaPill

      Apr 14, 2016 at 5:55 pm

      +1

    • setter02

      May 3, 2016 at 8:25 pm

      Don’t tell Butch he can’t teach because he can’t play as well as his students…

  8. Lost in the convo

    Apr 13, 2016 at 10:38 am

    is the fact that the lie angle in his dingle length set is due his particular swing. For anyone else that is thinking of trying single length irons the lie angle doesn’t have to be so upright. I would think the biggest issue for anyone wanting to attempt single length irons would be the club head weights all the same and handling the yardage gaps. I think a lot of guys are sticking w/ tradition here and not even willing to try a set of single length clubs. Would be interested in trying if a company stepped up and did like the new Ben Hogan Golf irons and allowed a 30 day trial of a few clubs. Just my 2 cents.

    • Joshuaplaysgolf

      Apr 13, 2016 at 12:11 pm

      ‘Dingle length’ lol. I’m not sure if your asking actual questions, since your post of void of actual punctuation…but if you are actually asking, yes, weighting and distance falling is the challenge here. My buddy is going through the process of getting single length irons dialed in right now. The lie angle is unique to Dechambeau’s stance/swing. It’s VERY upright and he takes most of the angle out of his wrists at address, so his arms and the shaft are almost parallel. If your going the single length route, you’ll just have to have the lie angle measured for your swing, most likely not 13* upright.

      • SirBigSpur

        Apr 13, 2016 at 12:31 pm

        “your post of void of actual punctuation.”

        Dude. You’re that guy aren’t you?

        • Joshuaplaysgolf

          Apr 13, 2016 at 5:25 pm

          Lol. Not intentionally, it just makes it really difficult to discern if it’s a rhetorical question or for real asking. But sure, I’ll be ‘that guy’ in this instance.

  9. Smoking gun

    Apr 13, 2016 at 10:09 am

    Like the song say’s, ” money money money mon’ey, money”!!!

  10. M

    Apr 13, 2016 at 8:50 am

    Yikes, not sure I could look down at a neck that is that rounded, Cobra may have to work on that a little, maybe get Miura to forge them with spin welded hosels and stamp cobra on them

  11. Chuck D

    Apr 13, 2016 at 6:31 am

    Wait a minute, they’ve been forcing this Einstein golfer dude and his crude scientific looking equipment down our throats for the past year and he jumps ship, to now hit traditional “looking” I know, I know already, they’re still one length, settle down, golf gear?! Sheesh, what’s next, he’s
    gonna switch to a baseball cap, or stop the presses, a visor? Or maybe white pants? Well Edel, he couldn’t win the Mahztaz with your gear, so now the musical clubs begin. You….uhhh….GO DECHAMBEAU, or however he spells his name.

  12. MLECUNI

    Apr 13, 2016 at 3:23 am

    I still don’t know why edel made him a new set recently. Sad for them to put hard work and have to let him go.

  13. jordy

    Apr 12, 2016 at 11:22 pm

    Those are some upright looking lie angles!

  14. cody

    Apr 12, 2016 at 6:58 pm

    interesting that it is blade low lofts and cavity high lofts. kinda backwards isnt it?

    • Greg Moore

      Apr 12, 2016 at 7:40 pm

      There is a full set of muscle back irons and a full set of cavity back irons. Not sure if he will put either one in play this week

      • Richard

        Apr 13, 2016 at 12:05 am

        Money talks, he will play a Cobra Iron before long even if it is not one of these two….and you can bet Cobra is biting at the bit to get it set so they can make a version for the public…I would think if your playing a one length set of irons you will have to be fit for lie angle for sure…

      • cody

        Apr 13, 2016 at 11:21 am

        thanks, it seemed so strange to me.

    • Teaj

      Apr 13, 2016 at 6:47 pm

      could be two sets. it could also be that the CB with the added weight to the lower lofted irons spins to much due to the added weight to the head to bring the swing weight up because of the shorter shaft length.

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Whats in the Bag

Patrick Reed WITB 2021 (July)

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Patrick Reed what’s in the bag accurate as of The Olympics. 

Driver: Titleist TSi3 (9 degrees)
Shaft: Aldila Rogue Silver 125 MSI 70 TX

(Photo via Sports Marketing Surveys)

3-wood: TaylorMade SIM (15 degrees)
Shaft: Aldila Rogue Black 130 MSI 80 TX

Hybrid: Callaway Apex Pro (20 degrees)
Shaft: UST Mamiya Recoil Prototype 95

Irons: Grindworks PR-202 (4) Grindworks PR-101A (5-PW)
Shafts:  True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: Artisan Proto (51), Vokey SM8 (56-08M), Vokey WedgeWorks Proto (60)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

(Photo via Sports Marketing Surveys)

Putter: Odyssey White Hot Pro 3

Ball: Titleist Pro V1

Featured image via @sms_on_tour

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Equipment

Titleist launches new U505 utility and T200 long irons

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Titleist has introduced its new U505 utility and T200 long irons, which are available for fittings today and will hit retail on August 26.

The new U505 utility irons and T200 long irons from Titleist will offer players seven new opportunities for golfers looking to increase launch and spin from their utility and long irons, including four options in the new U505 model and three irons from the new T200 family.

Note: This is the tour U505. The retail version doesn’t have the hotmelt port.

“The new U•505 is the direct result of tour player feedback of the originalU•500 and U•510utility irons. The U•505 combines the best of both, and the result is our highest performing and most playable utility iron yet. The new T200 long irons offer similar high launch and speed with the look and feel of an iron set at the top of the bag.” – Josh Talge, Vice President, Titleist Golf Club Marketing

2021 Titleist U•505 utility: ‘The Players Utility Irons’

The new U•505 utility iron from Titleist is a wide-soled, high-launching club designed for the player looking to increase launch and speed from their long irons with a faster face.

With a thinner forged L-Face and the infusion of Max Impact Technology (Max Impact 2.0), the U•505 is Titleist’s highest COR utility iron ever.

The club features a new reconfigured hollow body, core support structure, and enhanced high resilience polymer core in design to ensure that dynamic speed generation now comes with a superior feel and sound.

Utilizing Denser D18 tungsten weights and a brazing process used in aerospace construction, Titleist engineers could concentrate weight more efficiently and be even more precise with CG placement. In the U•505 utility iron, that meant sliding it lower and towards the heel, where according to the company, tour pros and better players felt it improved launch dynamics the most.

The U•505 was designed with a shorter blade and shallow face but kept the wide sole to maintain all of the performance advantages of its predecessors while moving towards a look that feels more in line with an irons set.

Specs & Pricing

The new Titleist U•505 utility irons are priced at $249 (HZRDUS shaft) per club.

2021 Titleist T200 long irons: ‘Performance and Technology’

The new T200 long irons are designed for the better player looking for long irons to increase launch and speed at the top of their bag.

The improved Max Impact Technology in the new long irons from Titleist includes a core support design and an enhanced high resilience polymer core designed to improve both off-center speed and mass efficiency at impact across a forged, high COR SUP-10 L-Face Insert.

An engineered muscle plate contributes to precision sound tuning and saves weight which is optimized in a streamlined 17-4 chassis.

The retail version doesn’t have the hotmelt port.

The T200 long irons also feature a shorter blade length, less offset (same as the new T100), narrower topline and thinner sole. The combination of all of this is in design to provide long irons with a tour-inspired look and feel while delivering maximum speed and distance.

In addition, the long irons utilize denser D18 tungsten weights, which seek to provide greater mass efficiency, while also allowing Titleist engineers to position the CG more precisely in design for faster, more forgiving, and higher launching long irons.

Specs & Pricing

The new Titleist T200 long irons are priced at $249 (Project X HZRDUS shaft).

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Equipment

Titleist introduces next-generation T-Series irons

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After much anticipation since tour seeding started in June, Titleist has introduced its latest iteration of the T100 iron with four models: 2021 T100, T100S, T200, and T300, coming to retail on August 26.

The new T-Series iron family features new materials, processes, and refinements designed to provide exacting precision, performance, and unmatched feel, with a model for every golfer’s needs, according to the company. 

“The new T-Series irons represent another step forward in Titleist iron design and technology. With these new irons, across the board, every detail matters. They provide the best precision and performance in their respective iron category with stunning aesthetics and feel. Golfers don’t buy an iron ‘line’, they want specialization, and that’s what each of these models offer.” – Josh Talge, Vice President, Titleist Golf Club Marketing

2021 Titleist T100 iron: ‘The Modern Tour Iron’

The “player’s iron” of the new family, the T100 iron features an all-new Tour-designed sole, which was inspired by discussions with both the tour staff and the Vokey wedge design team. It features a new variable bounce sole design, which provides less bounce in the heel and more bounce in the toe to facilitate better turf interaction and improved feel.

The new T100 face features a continuous cradle construction that aims to provide a seamless striking surface and a more uniform leading edge than its predecessor.

A fully forged, dual cavity supports the face construction, and the faces on the 3-7 irons have been redesigned to impart slightly more spin for improved shot-shaping and increased control. The 8-PW are forged with one-piece 1025 carbon steel.

In addition, by utilizing a denser version of tungsten (D18) weights in the heel and toe of the 3-7 irons for greater mass efficiency and a brazing process used in aerospace construction, Titleist engineers were able to eliminate weld points and be even more precise with CG placement to produce the highest MOI in a “players iron.’

Jordan Spieth put the new T100 irons (4-9) in his bag earlier this month at The Open Championship, and speaking on the new clubs said

“The sole just glides through the ground so nicely. With the added bounce off the toe and the reduced bounce in the heel similar to the wedges that we have on those grinds, it just allows for some consistency when you get a little bit off. The idea that you can be on uneven lies and have it kind of make up for that, and then if you get in the rough and have it not drag as much, but instead slide through just as easily, that’s where we see the improvement in these irons.”

Jessica Korda is another high profile player to put the T100 irons (5-9) into play recently as well as a T200 4-iron, and said on the new irons from Titleist:

“They’re just really pure. It’s like I’m hitting blades, but you’re not. I loved how solid they felt. The height on them is incredible. It’s exactly what I’m looking for, especially in the longer irons.

“The consistency is what I look for. Because when I’m standing over the ball and I need this thing to travel a number that I have in my head, and I can rely on that and just be like, just make a good swing, it takes so much of the guesswork out of it and it makes you commit to the shot more. I don’t change often. It has to beat what I have, and this is really nice. To be even better, to help me hold greens like I need to with the longer irons, especially going into par fives, it’s really, really nice.”

Specs & Pricing

The new Titleist T100 irons are priced at $186 per club and $1,299 per 7-piece set (steel).

2021 Titleist T100S irons: ‘The Faster Tour Iron’

Aimed at players who want the feel of a tour iron but who want added distance, the new T100S head dimensions exactly match the specs of the T100, except for being engineered – not bent – two degrees stronger.

The iron also features the same fully forged face, backed by an innovative Muscle Channel designed to add both speed and launch. 

Like the T100, the new T100S face features a continuous cradle construction designed to create a seamless striking surface and a more uniform leading edge.

A fully forged, dual cavity supports the face construction, with the 3-7 iron faces redesigned to impart slightly more spin for improved shot-shaping and increased control, while the 8-W are forged with one-piece 1025 carbon steel.

In addition, utilizing denser D18 tungsten weights and a brazing process used in aerospace construction, the T100S irons feature the exact precise CG calibration as the T100 irons.

Weight savings from the Muscle Channel are shifted to produce even lower CG and higher launch, resulting in improved MOI and increased ball speed from a solid, fully forged design.

“The uniqueness of the T100•S comes from the fact that we engineered the 2* stronger loft into the iron rather than just bend them. The reason for this is to keep the integrity of the sole and optimize its performance through the turf. That would be lost by simply bending a T100.

“In addition, the ‘S’ represents ‘speed’ and the new Muscle Channel delivers it through the long and mid irons by providing longer distance, tighter dispersion and higher angle of descent for greater consistency and scoring opportunities. It has the same look and feel of the T100 but longer flight for those who want it.” – Marni Ines, Director, Titleist Irons Development, Golf Club R&D

Specs & Pricing

The new Titleist T100S irons are priced at $186 per club and $1,299 per 7-piece set (steel).

2021 Titleist T200 irons: ‘The Tour’s Distance Iron’

The retail T200 doesn’t have the hotmelt port pictured on the tour version.

With 10 different patents utilized, Titleist is calling its new T200 iron its most advanced iron ever.

The improved Max Impact Technology (Max Impact 2.0) in the T200 iron now includes a core support design and an enhanced high resilience polymer core designed to improve both off-center speed and mass efficiency at impact across a forged, high COR SUP-10 L-Face Insert.

An engineered muscle plate seeks to contribute to precision sound tuning and saves weight, which is optimized in the new, streamlined 17-4 chassis.

A shorter blade length, less offset (same as T100), narrower topline and thinner sole provides a tour-inspired look and feel while still aiming to provide maximum speed and distance.

As with the other clubs in the T-series family, Titleist utilized denser D18 tungsten weights in the 3-7 irons of the T200 irons for greater mass efficiency and a brazing process used in aerospace construction allowed engineers to position the CG more precisely for maximum benefit in every club.

“Many golfers want the benefit of advanced technology in an iron –and the T200 is our most advanced iron yet – but they don’t necessarily want to see it. All of that ‘Max Impact’ technology-and more-is now ‘under the hood’ in the new T200, so it looks and feels like a Tour-played iron but has the game improvement qualities preferred or required by this golfer.

“With the evolution of Max Impact, we were able to include an Engineered Muscle Plate that allowed us to free up weight and add lightweight polymer and over 100g of high-density tungsten to the design. The result was extremely high MOI properties at Tour inspired blade lengths which allows the iron face to return more energy to the golf ball on off center shots and produce tighter dispersion and more consistent distance.” – Marni Ines, Director, Titleist Irons Development, Golf Club R&D

Specs & Pricing

The new Titleist T200 irons are priced at $186 per club and $1,299 per 7-piece set (steel).

2021 Titleist T300 irons: ‘The Ultimate Game Improvement Iron’

Aimed at those seeking high launch along with long-distance and forgiveness, the new T300 iron features Max Impact technology which seeks to maximize speed across a new variable face thickness (VFT) design.

The Max Impact 2.0 technology in the T300 irons is hidden under the badge. A cantilever core support structure features a new high resilience polymer core in design to deliver maximum speed and distance control.

The T300 now employs a High COR Variable Face Design that is thinner towards the heel in the long and mid irons to improve performance at what is traditionally one of the least effective strike points.

The high-density tungsten (D18) weights are utilized in the heel and toe of the 4-7 irons for greater mass efficiency. In addition, Titleist engineers were able to add 40 percent more tungsten than was in the previous generation T300 through a brazing process applied from aerospace construction usually reserved for Tour-played irons.

The size and shape of the T300 is designed to provide confidence, while a new chrome-plated finish offers a premium look.

“The T300 is the ultimate Titleist game improvement iron. It is for the golfer who wants high launch, long distance and forgiveness, and wants to see the technology they are using. This model utilizes the Max Impact 2.0 technology which is featured in a sleek, clean package at addres sfor which Titleist irons are known.

The design team retained the offset, shape and size, but was able to add 40 percent more tungsten to this iron, precisely lower the CG and meet the performance needs of this golfer.” – Josh Talge, Vice President, Titleist Golf Club Marketing

Specs & Pricing

The new Titleist T200 irons are priced at $143 per club and $999 per 7-piece set (steel).

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