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Ping G30 Drivers, Fairway Woods, Hybrids and Irons

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G30 Drivers

No matter where a golf equipment manufacturer places the center of gravity in its latest driver, one thing is true; modern driver heads aren’t very aerodynamic objects. Ping’s new G30 driver doesn’t change that, but the company’s engineers found a way to improve its aerodynamics without compromising the framework that has made Ping’s line of G-Series drivers some of the best performers in the industry.

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The improved aerodynamics come in the way of turbulators, which are six ridges on the front of the G30’s crown that reduce drag forces. According to Ping, the turbulators helped Bubba Watson increase his driver club head speed 2 mph, which lead to 7 to 10 yards of extra driving distance.

Click here to see photos of Bubba Watson’s pink G30 driver.

“What turbulators do is give you a little bit of turbulence that makes the air stick to the surface,” said Marty Jertson, Ping’s director of product development. “Air sticking to the surface is a good thing … The air already sticks to the surface of the sole of a driver pretty well, so we don’t need turbulators there.”

Click here to read our full review of the Ping G30 driver.

Golfers who swing faster create more drag forces, so they’ll gain more club head speed from the turbulators than average golfers, who can expect gains of about 0.7 mph according to an internal Ping study. All things being equal, that equates to about 2-to-3 yards of more distance than Ping’s G25 driver. All things aren’t equal between the G25 and the G30, however, which is why golfers might be able to hit the company’s new driver a little more than 2 or 3 yards farther than the G25.

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The G30 uses a new T9S titanium face, which is thinner, stronger and lighter than the company’s previous driver faces. The new material saves 4 grams of weight from the driver’s construction, which was redistributed low and rearward in the driver head to boost the G30’s moment of inertia (MOI), a measure of a club’s retention of ball speed on off-center hits. Its MOI is even higher than that of the G25, which was already the highest MOI driver on the market. The lower, more rearward center of gravity (CG) also makes the G30 about 150 rpm lower spinning than the G25 driver, according to Ping.

Moving the weight lower and more rearward has another advantage, Jertson said. The position of the weight helps the driver head swing more upward heading into impact, something that’s known as “increasing dynamic loft.” That helps golfers launch the G30 driver higher, creating more of the high-launch, low-spin conditions that can lead to more distance.

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The G30 will also be available in Ping’s SF Tec model, which stands for “Straight Flight Technology.” The G30 SF Tec drivers are nearly identical to the standard models except that their face angles sit more closed at address and they have CG’s that are shifted slightly toward the heel. That helps golfers who tend to fade or slice the ball to more easily square the clubface at impact. The SF Tec driver heads are also 3 grams lighter (203 grams instead of 206 grams). Those combined changes can increase driving distance as much as 12 yards, the company claims.

The G30 drivers are available in lofts of 9, 10.5 and 12 degrees, and have a new adjustable hosel that’s the same weight and diameter as Ping’s fixed hosels. The drivers can be adjusted as much as 1-degree up or down from the driver’s printed loft and allows golfers to adjust loft incrementally as well: 0.6-degrees higher or lower from the printed loft. The stock swing weight is D3.

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Since Ping’s new adjustable hosel screw is slightly larger, shafts fit with the company’s G25 adjustable hosel sleeves will not fit in G30 drivers or fairway woods.

The G30 SF Tec drivers are available in lofts of 10 and 12 degrees. They have the same adjustable hosel as the G30 and have stock swing weight of D1.

The G30 and G30 SF Tec drivers come stock with the company’s new TFC 419D shafts, which are counterbalanced and have a stock length of 45.75 inches. They’re available in the following flexes: Soft R (53 grams), Regular (55 grams), Stiff (59 grams) and X-Stiff (63 grams).

ping g30 woods

Both the G30 and G30 SF Tec drivers carry an MSRP of $385 and are currently available for pre-order. They’ll hit stores along with the G30 fairway woods, hybrids and irons in late July.

New Ping Tour shafts

Golfers who prefer shafts that are a little shorter, heavier, stiffer and have less torque can also opt for the company’s new “Tour” shafts, which have a slightly lower balance point that creates the same D3 swing weight while being 0.5 inches shorter (45.25 inches). They also launch a little lower than the TFC 419D shafts.

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The Tour shafts are not exclusive to the G30 launch, which means they’re available for all current Ping metal woods in Tour 65 and Tour 80 models, as well as a Tour 90 shaft that’s designed for hybrids.

G30 Fairway Woods

Like Ping’s G30 drivers, the G30 fairway woods have turbulators on their crown to help boost clubhead speeds through improved aerodynamics. That will lead to some distance gains, but won’t have nearly the impact on their performance as their new carpenter 475 steel faces, which are 44 percent stronger than the 17-4 steel faces used on the G25 fairway woods.

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According to Jertson, the thinner, stronger faces will give the G30 fairway woods approximately 1.5-to-2 mph more ball speed than the G25 models, which along with other changes make the G30’s much more of a distance threat than their predecessors.

At address, golfers might notice that Ping made the heel height of the G30 fairway woods a bit taller, creating a little more surface area that causes the face to flex more at impact.

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The new faces and improved manufacturing techniques also freed up more discretionary weight for Ping to move the CG of the G30 3 wood (14.5 degrees, 167 cubic centimeters) lower and more rearward like the G30 driver to raise its launch, lower its spin and increase forgiveness. The higher-lofted G30 5 wood (18 degrees, 151cc) and 7 wood (21 degrees, 145cc) have CG’s that are moved slightly forward to help lower their spin, which creates a more penetrating trajectory that’s less likely to “balloon.”

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For the first time in a G-Series fairway wood, Ping has also made the G30’s adjustable. They use the same adjustable hosel as the G30 driver, giving them a 2-degree range of adjustability.

The G30 fairway woods come stock with Ping’s TFC 419F shaft in Soft R (63 grams), R (64 grams), S (68 grams) and X (69 grams) flexes and carry an MSRP of $275. Stock swing weight is D1.

G30 Hybrids

The G30 hybrids use a new heat-treated 17-4 stainless steel face that improves strength by 19 percent, boosting the CT of the hybrids by 20 points. That will give them a little more ball speed than the G25 hybrids, and with their similar trajectory that means they’ll likely carry a few yards farther for most golfers.

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There’s no turbulators due to their smaller, more aerodynamic size, but the shape of the hybrids was tweaked to include a flatter top rail and a higher heel section that gives them a more square appearance at address.

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The G30 hybrids are available in lofts of 17, 19, 22, 26 and 30 degrees and use progressive CG locations that are low and rearward in the 17- and 19-degree hybrids for maximum forgiveness and peak height, and more forward in the 22-, 26- and 30-degree hybrids to create a flatter trajectory.

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They come stock with Ping’s TFC 419H shaft in Soft R, R, S and X flexes and carry an MSRP of $242.50. Stock swing weight is D1.

Click here to see what GolfWRX members are saying about the G30 hybrids in our forum.

G30 Irons

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Ping’s G30 irons have thinner faces than the company’s uber-forgiving G25 irons, but their design doesn’t follow the industry trend of making thinner, unsupported faces to create more ball speed and more distance.

“The faces are not unsupported,” Jertson said. “We want to be able to control the [flexing of our iron faces] to give our irons more consistency.”

With Ping irons, there’s almost always an effort to reposition as much weight around the perimeter of the iron as possible to create more forgiveness and the G30 irons are no exception. But first things first, Ping engineers wanted the G30 irons to fly a little farther, which isn’t an easy thing to do when the iron faces can’t be made to flex more. The company achieved its goal by giving the irons slightly longer shafts to help golfers create more clubhead speed and a higher launch angle. The longer shafts, along with the slightly stronger lofts, also provide better gapping throughout the set.

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The G30 irons (left) are larger and have wider soles than Ping’s i25 irons.

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Sound like a simple fix? It is until you consider this: when you make a club longer and don’t want to increase its swing weight, you have to remove weight from the club head. And since Ping engineers didn’t want to make the G30 irons less forgiving than the G25’s, they had to do more with less and needed to execute several different design plans to accomplish their goals.

They started with slightly longer blade lengths, which are most noticeable in the 4-iron through 7-iron clubs. That gave the engineers a larger canvas that made it easier to redistribute weight around the perimeter of the irons. The G30’s were also designed with a deeper undercut that lowers their CG to boost the their MOI, which helps iron shots that are hit off-center fly closer to the distance of shots hit in the center of the face. The soles of the G30 irons are wider as well, which moved the CG of the irons a little lower and deeper to further boost MOI. The soles have their extra width positioned on the club’s trailing edge, where it is not really a factor in turf interaction.

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A Ping G30 iron 5 iron (right) and i25 5 iron at address.

Add up those changes and the G30’s not only fly higher than the G25 irons, but the 4 iron is about 7 yards longer, according to Ping estimates, and the 7 iron is about 3 yards longer. The MOI of the irons is also 2 percent greater from heel-to-toe and 1 percent from top-to-bottom despite the lighter head weights.

Visually, the G30 irons have less offset than the G25 irons, a change that is most noticeable from the 6 iron down. There’s also a softer elastomer badging that helps improve the feel of the irons.

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A G30 4 iron at address. 

The G30 irons are available in 4-PW, UW, SW and LW and have the same lofts and shaft lengths as the company’s Karsten irons. The 4 iron’s stock loft is 21 degrees, the 6 iron is 27 degrees and the PW is 45 degrees. They carry an MSRP of $110 per club with the company’s stock CFS Distance steel shafts (Soft R, R, S, X flexes) and $125 per club TFC 419i graphite shafts (Soft R, R and S flexes).

Ping G30 iron specs

Click here to see what GolfWRX members are saying about Ping’s G30 irons in our forum.

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33 Comments

33 Comments

  1. long&left

    May 8, 2015 at 12:50 am

    always hated the look of the g30 woods with the fins – what a gimmick i thought….then i demoed the 3 wood today for a whole round…..whoaaaa give me that ugle stick anytime…
    this thing is the dogs bol…..s…ridiculous long with great penetrating flight – even mishits are long especially near the bottom.
    as easy hitting from the deck as the tee. little hard to shape though as its just wants to go straight…..hated it but now that i tried her, i have to have her….
    cant wait to try the driver now…irons? nah cant cheat on my mizzy’s

  2. MASSIVE MIKE!

    Apr 10, 2015 at 11:37 am

    I ordered a set with cushions. After 6 months I found that they never put in the cushions.
    I ordered a wedge with a cushion. It came with no cushion and the wrong lie.
    I sent the clubs back to get the cushion put in and all the cushion labels peeled off in 5 days.
    I sent the clubs back for repair and they sent them back with the wrong grips

    I WILL NEVER TRUST PING AGAIN AFTER 30+ YEARS—– WORST CUSTOMER SERVICE EVER!

  3. THE SWEET THONG

    Mar 21, 2015 at 9:57 pm

    I have these with KBS TOUR V STIFF. This is the best iron I have ever hit. 2.5 Handicap w/ 30 years of playing. Wish they made a long iron like a 2 or 3 though.

  4. Jeff

    Mar 11, 2015 at 2:49 pm

    I just got a G30 fairway wood. 14.5 3 wood and it’s hot and long. I like the turbulators. My auto correct does not. I like to look at them at address. There’s only 4 on the 3 wood crown and it kinda shows you, big hook, small hook, little slice, big slice.

  5. Stuart

    Aug 15, 2014 at 9:41 am

    I have always disliked ping until today hit the 3 wood wow wee seriously long like 20 metres fly to my sldr

  6. Tony

    Aug 4, 2014 at 12:09 pm

    Took the Tour shafted 80 XS 3 wood out for the first time Saturday.
    Short par 5 495 yards, I hit 2 3 woods, fairway and on the green for easy bird.
    Heavier shaft, shorter length has made the 3 wood a go to club once again!

  7. Tyler Wainright

    Jul 19, 2014 at 9:02 am

    I just had my first Trackman fitting after not playing for 7+ years and the G30s, for me anyway, were spot on. I hit the 7 iron only. I haven’t kept up with all the gear changes over the years but the G30s with stock shafts felt amazing compared to my current set. Nice high ball flight and good carry too.

  8. Martin

    Jul 6, 2014 at 5:22 pm

    I would like to see pics of the irons next to the G25 rather than the I25.

    Makes them look chunkier than they probably are.

    • Joe Golfer

      Jul 13, 2014 at 1:50 am

      Couldn’t agree with you more, Martin.
      Let’s compare apples to apples instead of apples to oranges.

  9. Rich

    Jul 4, 2014 at 11:02 pm

    I like the set up of the irons. It covers roughly a normal 3-PW loft range with 7 clubs instead of 8. That’s a bonus if you ask me. Now I can carry an extra long club or wedge with only a minor change in gapping between clubs. Bring it on!

  10. TL

    Jul 3, 2014 at 9:22 pm

    Surprising that length of 5 iron measures 38.25″, which is 0.5″ longer than Ping i20.

  11. Rocky

    Jul 3, 2014 at 8:54 pm

    Turbulators? Lol….

    If TM came up with that name and those fins, this post would be rabid by now…

    Congrats to Ping for having the stones to come out with something *very* un-ping like.

    • Hung Le

      Jul 7, 2014 at 8:56 pm

      Just got an i25 driver to replace my titleist D2 913, love the Ping unique way it has. Totally agree to the “un-ping” thing, wonder if they have just hired some former TM designers? 😀

  12. froneputt

    Jul 3, 2014 at 5:22 pm

    G30 Driver looks great as well as the graphics and color — looking forward to a demo.

    The turbulators might be a bit much on the fairway…

  13. RAT

    Jul 3, 2014 at 3:35 pm

    Typical Ping , change the colors and badge now it’s new and better than ever…. yep

    • Mikec

      Jul 3, 2014 at 8:25 pm

      Typical of “every” OEM for the most part. At least ping does not release a new iron every year or even 6 months like some!

      • WILSON

        Jul 7, 2014 at 1:19 pm

        … ping does release a new iron every year. G25>i25>s55>G30

  14. TB

    Jul 3, 2014 at 3:28 pm

    As far as driver, fairway, and hybrids go the g25 and i25 compete against each other. They seem to be very similar as far as numbers go (for me at least). Hope the G30 woods and hybrid off something different.

    Basically I feel like a good player is just as likely to play a g25 wood as they would an i25.

  15. James

    Jul 3, 2014 at 3:02 pm

    The little white ring or whatever would bother me. I would use a black magic marker to turn it black.

  16. Prut

    Jul 3, 2014 at 2:13 pm

    The G30s look a lot like the G2s.

    • Tarheel

      Jul 4, 2014 at 9:24 am

      I thought so too. I had G 2’s and liked the look

  17. Duncan Castles

    Jul 3, 2014 at 10:27 am

    Hmmm. Longer shafts and stronger lofts in the G30 irons should mean harder to hit. The longer irons in particular.

    • harrold

      Jul 3, 2014 at 1:46 pm

      No it just means that the 5 iron in that set has a 6 stamped on the bottom of it as they are all a club stronger

      • Duncan Castles

        Jul 3, 2014 at 5:26 pm

        And is a 5 iron harder to hit than a 6 iron, a 3 iron harder than a 4 iron? Yes. So these clubs should be harder to hit…

        • Ben

          Jul 4, 2014 at 1:04 pm

          Yeah, I don’t really like the sound of that at all. Harder to control is never a good thing and gaining a couple yards isn’t enough to justify that.

    • wcavanau

      Jul 3, 2014 at 3:23 pm

      Kind of surprised Ping did this. Seem to be following the lead of TM in this regard. They are just about a club stronger that the G25.

      • Keith

        Jul 5, 2014 at 9:16 am

        It is a progressive length change. Only in long / mid irons and enough to balance control and a distance gain. That’s also why they played with the lofts, if you look closely at the specs the lofts change to balance out the effective carry gain with added progressive length. They don’t just make all clubs 1 degree stronger and 1/2″ longer like other companies have done. PING doesn’t release anything without significantly improving on a previous model. It may look the similar but with blue graphics, but it performs better, straighter and more consistently.

  18. Rob

    Jul 3, 2014 at 10:10 am

    Had the G25 irons come out a week earlier, maybe they could have been included in the “player’s irons” reviews.

  19. Shooter McGavin

    Jul 3, 2014 at 9:41 am

    Wow, I think the new blue color scheme makes the clubs look cheesy and cheap. I like the simple look of the G25 series.

  20. KJ

    Jul 3, 2014 at 8:23 am

    The hybrids are not adjustable.

    • Keith

      Jul 5, 2014 at 9:19 am

      Hybrids are long iron replacements. Why would you want an adjustable long iron? Adjustability has some benefits, but it also adds unwanted weight / drag, subsequently decreasing forgiveness and clubhead speed. Get fit properly and there is no need for 15 loft/face angle adjustments!

      • MHendon

        Jul 5, 2014 at 10:58 pm

        Why would you want anything adjustable. Just give me a nice square set up with the right shaft and loft and I’m good to go.

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Whats in the Bag

Patrick Reed WITB 2021 (July)

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Patrick Reed what’s in the bag accurate as of The Olympics. 

Driver: Titleist TSi3 (9 degrees)
Shaft: Aldila Rogue Silver 125 MSI 70 TX

(Photo via Sports Marketing Surveys)

3-wood: TaylorMade SIM (15 degrees)
Shaft: Aldila Rogue Black 130 MSI 80 TX

Hybrid: Callaway Apex Pro (20 degrees)
Shaft: UST Mamiya Recoil Prototype 95

Irons: Grindworks PR-202 (4) Grindworks PR-101A (5-PW)
Shafts:  True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: Artisan Proto (51), Vokey SM8 (56-08M), Vokey WedgeWorks Proto (60)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

(Photo via Sports Marketing Surveys)

Putter: Odyssey White Hot Pro 3

Ball: Titleist Pro V1

Featured image via @sms_on_tour

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Equipment

Titleist launches new U505 utility and T200 long irons

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Titleist has introduced its new U505 utility and T200 long irons, which are available for fittings today and will hit retail on August 26.

The new U505 utility irons and T200 long irons from Titleist will offer players seven new opportunities for golfers looking to increase launch and spin from their utility and long irons, including four options in the new U505 model and three irons from the new T200 family.

Note: This is the tour U505. The retail version doesn’t have the hotmelt port.

“The new U•505 is the direct result of tour player feedback of the originalU•500 and U•510utility irons. The U•505 combines the best of both, and the result is our highest performing and most playable utility iron yet. The new T200 long irons offer similar high launch and speed with the look and feel of an iron set at the top of the bag.” – Josh Talge, Vice President, Titleist Golf Club Marketing

2021 Titleist U•505 utility: ‘The Players Utility Irons’

The new U•505 utility iron from Titleist is a wide-soled, high-launching club designed for the player looking to increase launch and speed from their long irons with a faster face.

With a thinner forged L-Face and the infusion of Max Impact Technology (Max Impact 2.0), the U•505 is Titleist’s highest COR utility iron ever.

The club features a new reconfigured hollow body, core support structure, and enhanced high resilience polymer core in design to ensure that dynamic speed generation now comes with a superior feel and sound.

Utilizing Denser D18 tungsten weights and a brazing process used in aerospace construction, Titleist engineers could concentrate weight more efficiently and be even more precise with CG placement. In the U•505 utility iron, that meant sliding it lower and towards the heel, where according to the company, tour pros and better players felt it improved launch dynamics the most.

The U•505 was designed with a shorter blade and shallow face but kept the wide sole to maintain all of the performance advantages of its predecessors while moving towards a look that feels more in line with an irons set.

Specs & Pricing

The new Titleist U•505 utility irons are priced at $249 (HZRDUS shaft) per club.

2021 Titleist T200 long irons: ‘Performance and Technology’

The new T200 long irons are designed for the better player looking for long irons to increase launch and speed at the top of their bag.

The improved Max Impact Technology in the new long irons from Titleist includes a core support design and an enhanced high resilience polymer core designed to improve both off-center speed and mass efficiency at impact across a forged, high COR SUP-10 L-Face Insert.

An engineered muscle plate contributes to precision sound tuning and saves weight which is optimized in a streamlined 17-4 chassis.

The retail version doesn’t have the hotmelt port.

The T200 long irons also feature a shorter blade length, less offset (same as the new T100), narrower topline and thinner sole. The combination of all of this is in design to provide long irons with a tour-inspired look and feel while delivering maximum speed and distance.

In addition, the long irons utilize denser D18 tungsten weights, which seek to provide greater mass efficiency, while also allowing Titleist engineers to position the CG more precisely in design for faster, more forgiving, and higher launching long irons.

Specs & Pricing

The new Titleist T200 long irons are priced at $249 (Project X HZRDUS shaft).

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Equipment

Titleist introduces next-generation T-Series irons

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After much anticipation since tour seeding started in June, Titleist has introduced its latest iteration of the T100 iron with four models: 2021 T100, T100S, T200, and T300, coming to retail on August 26.

The new T-Series iron family features new materials, processes, and refinements designed to provide exacting precision, performance, and unmatched feel, with a model for every golfer’s needs, according to the company. 

“The new T-Series irons represent another step forward in Titleist iron design and technology. With these new irons, across the board, every detail matters. They provide the best precision and performance in their respective iron category with stunning aesthetics and feel. Golfers don’t buy an iron ‘line’, they want specialization, and that’s what each of these models offer.” – Josh Talge, Vice President, Titleist Golf Club Marketing

2021 Titleist T100 iron: ‘The Modern Tour Iron’

The “player’s iron” of the new family, the T100 iron features an all-new Tour-designed sole, which was inspired by discussions with both the tour staff and the Vokey wedge design team. It features a new variable bounce sole design, which provides less bounce in the heel and more bounce in the toe to facilitate better turf interaction and improved feel.

The new T100 face features a continuous cradle construction that aims to provide a seamless striking surface and a more uniform leading edge than its predecessor.

A fully forged, dual cavity supports the face construction, and the faces on the 3-7 irons have been redesigned to impart slightly more spin for improved shot-shaping and increased control. The 8-PW are forged with one-piece 1025 carbon steel.

In addition, by utilizing a denser version of tungsten (D18) weights in the heel and toe of the 3-7 irons for greater mass efficiency and a brazing process used in aerospace construction, Titleist engineers were able to eliminate weld points and be even more precise with CG placement to produce the highest MOI in a “players iron.’

Jordan Spieth put the new T100 irons (4-9) in his bag earlier this month at The Open Championship, and speaking on the new clubs said

“The sole just glides through the ground so nicely. With the added bounce off the toe and the reduced bounce in the heel similar to the wedges that we have on those grinds, it just allows for some consistency when you get a little bit off. The idea that you can be on uneven lies and have it kind of make up for that, and then if you get in the rough and have it not drag as much, but instead slide through just as easily, that’s where we see the improvement in these irons.”

Jessica Korda is another high profile player to put the T100 irons (5-9) into play recently as well as a T200 4-iron, and said on the new irons from Titleist:

“They’re just really pure. It’s like I’m hitting blades, but you’re not. I loved how solid they felt. The height on them is incredible. It’s exactly what I’m looking for, especially in the longer irons.

“The consistency is what I look for. Because when I’m standing over the ball and I need this thing to travel a number that I have in my head, and I can rely on that and just be like, just make a good swing, it takes so much of the guesswork out of it and it makes you commit to the shot more. I don’t change often. It has to beat what I have, and this is really nice. To be even better, to help me hold greens like I need to with the longer irons, especially going into par fives, it’s really, really nice.”

Specs & Pricing

The new Titleist T100 irons are priced at $186 per club and $1,299 per 7-piece set (steel).

2021 Titleist T100S irons: ‘The Faster Tour Iron’

Aimed at players who want the feel of a tour iron but who want added distance, the new T100S head dimensions exactly match the specs of the T100, except for being engineered – not bent – two degrees stronger.

The iron also features the same fully forged face, backed by an innovative Muscle Channel designed to add both speed and launch. 

Like the T100, the new T100S face features a continuous cradle construction designed to create a seamless striking surface and a more uniform leading edge.

A fully forged, dual cavity supports the face construction, with the 3-7 iron faces redesigned to impart slightly more spin for improved shot-shaping and increased control, while the 8-W are forged with one-piece 1025 carbon steel.

In addition, utilizing denser D18 tungsten weights and a brazing process used in aerospace construction, the T100S irons feature the exact precise CG calibration as the T100 irons.

Weight savings from the Muscle Channel are shifted to produce even lower CG and higher launch, resulting in improved MOI and increased ball speed from a solid, fully forged design.

“The uniqueness of the T100•S comes from the fact that we engineered the 2* stronger loft into the iron rather than just bend them. The reason for this is to keep the integrity of the sole and optimize its performance through the turf. That would be lost by simply bending a T100.

“In addition, the ‘S’ represents ‘speed’ and the new Muscle Channel delivers it through the long and mid irons by providing longer distance, tighter dispersion and higher angle of descent for greater consistency and scoring opportunities. It has the same look and feel of the T100 but longer flight for those who want it.” – Marni Ines, Director, Titleist Irons Development, Golf Club R&D

Specs & Pricing

The new Titleist T100S irons are priced at $186 per club and $1,299 per 7-piece set (steel).

2021 Titleist T200 irons: ‘The Tour’s Distance Iron’

The retail T200 doesn’t have the hotmelt port pictured on the tour version.

With 10 different patents utilized, Titleist is calling its new T200 iron its most advanced iron ever.

The improved Max Impact Technology (Max Impact 2.0) in the T200 iron now includes a core support design and an enhanced high resilience polymer core designed to improve both off-center speed and mass efficiency at impact across a forged, high COR SUP-10 L-Face Insert.

An engineered muscle plate seeks to contribute to precision sound tuning and saves weight, which is optimized in the new, streamlined 17-4 chassis.

A shorter blade length, less offset (same as T100), narrower topline and thinner sole provides a tour-inspired look and feel while still aiming to provide maximum speed and distance.

As with the other clubs in the T-series family, Titleist utilized denser D18 tungsten weights in the 3-7 irons of the T200 irons for greater mass efficiency and a brazing process used in aerospace construction allowed engineers to position the CG more precisely for maximum benefit in every club.

“Many golfers want the benefit of advanced technology in an iron –and the T200 is our most advanced iron yet – but they don’t necessarily want to see it. All of that ‘Max Impact’ technology-and more-is now ‘under the hood’ in the new T200, so it looks and feels like a Tour-played iron but has the game improvement qualities preferred or required by this golfer.

“With the evolution of Max Impact, we were able to include an Engineered Muscle Plate that allowed us to free up weight and add lightweight polymer and over 100g of high-density tungsten to the design. The result was extremely high MOI properties at Tour inspired blade lengths which allows the iron face to return more energy to the golf ball on off center shots and produce tighter dispersion and more consistent distance.” – Marni Ines, Director, Titleist Irons Development, Golf Club R&D

Specs & Pricing

The new Titleist T200 irons are priced at $186 per club and $1,299 per 7-piece set (steel).

2021 Titleist T300 irons: ‘The Ultimate Game Improvement Iron’

Aimed at those seeking high launch along with long-distance and forgiveness, the new T300 iron features Max Impact technology which seeks to maximize speed across a new variable face thickness (VFT) design.

The Max Impact 2.0 technology in the T300 irons is hidden under the badge. A cantilever core support structure features a new high resilience polymer core in design to deliver maximum speed and distance control.

The T300 now employs a High COR Variable Face Design that is thinner towards the heel in the long and mid irons to improve performance at what is traditionally one of the least effective strike points.

The high-density tungsten (D18) weights are utilized in the heel and toe of the 4-7 irons for greater mass efficiency. In addition, Titleist engineers were able to add 40 percent more tungsten than was in the previous generation T300 through a brazing process applied from aerospace construction usually reserved for Tour-played irons.

The size and shape of the T300 is designed to provide confidence, while a new chrome-plated finish offers a premium look.

“The T300 is the ultimate Titleist game improvement iron. It is for the golfer who wants high launch, long distance and forgiveness, and wants to see the technology they are using. This model utilizes the Max Impact 2.0 technology which is featured in a sleek, clean package at addres sfor which Titleist irons are known.

The design team retained the offset, shape and size, but was able to add 40 percent more tungsten to this iron, precisely lower the CG and meet the performance needs of this golfer.” – Josh Talge, Vice President, Titleist Golf Club Marketing

Specs & Pricing

The new Titleist T200 irons are priced at $143 per club and $999 per 7-piece set (steel).

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