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DIY painting of golf clubs...What paint is the best to use?


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#1 jtitleist12

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 03:07 PM

I have been reading a lot of older threads on DIY golf club painting, specifically, drivers, 3 woods, and hybrids.

My questions are, what is the best paint to use for this process?  I have seen where a lot of members have used Krylon spray paints but those also seem to take forever to cure and be fully playable.  Would automotive aerosol paint work well in this application?  Every touch up bottle of car paint I have ever used dries extremely fast and holds up well to driving and being in the elements so I am thinking it should hold up on a golf club right?  I was thinking they may be a better option to because of the built in clear coat as well.

Also, do you have to rough up or sand the existing paint on the club head or can you just spray over what is there?

Really looking forward to hearing what the best options are.

Thanks,

- Josh


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#2 RookieBlue7

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 04:31 PM

I'd you have an hvlp gun, I'd go to an automotive paint shop and buy urethane auto paint and have them add flex additive to it. If you're going rattle can, duplicolor perfect match is a fine paint.

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#3 Nessism

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 04:49 PM

You sure flex additive is necessary?  I'm not an expert on painting golf clubs, but I've painted a fair bit of stuff over the years and it strikes me as unnecessary.  
I agree that automotive grade urethane would be best.  Sadly, the material costs are sky high, although they do make some spray bombs where they place catalyzed paint in a rattle can (Spray-Max). http://www.repaintsu..._2k_aerosol.cfm Get all your clubs together and have a spray party.  Once the paint goes off the rest of the can is junk.  No leftovers with that stuff.  Good news is it will be light years more durable than Krylon or Duplicolor.

Edited by Nessism, 26 March 2013 - 07:09 AM.

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#4 jtitleist12

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 06:09 PM

What about stuff like this in the 12oz aerosol spray can?

http://www.automotivetouchup.com/

Also, do you have to scuff up the head to prep or can you just go right over existing paint as is?

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#5 ronsc1985

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 06:10 PM

Air cure two part acrylic urethane auto paint is your best bet for a combination of durability and gloss. If you primarily want durability then powder coating is a good option. With powder coating you have to remove the shaft and anything inside the head that can melt since the powder coated head will be baked at something like 400 F.

Neither of these options is cheap. Look at the PIVCO website  to get a feel for the prices and quantities involved.

You will need a method to strip the old paint. Chemical stripper works just fine. You can abraid the old paint off but this tends to smooth out the surface you want to paint. Normally the painted surfaces have a kind of bead blast finish so no primer is needed to get good adhesion.

Lastly you need something to spray with. A good air brush is all you really need to spray the uncut urethane. You will also need an air source and a water and particle trap on the air line to whatever gun you are using.

The compressor CFM ratings for an air brush are minimal. If you are using plan on using something like a HVLP gun then the air requirements go up to at least the minimum air requirement of the particular gun.

Contrary to popular belief, automotive coatings have to be fairly flexible since the body panels move around some due to temperature changes and road conditions.

I've painted quite a few heads with two part urethane paint. Depending on how picky you are you can get a show car finish if you want. Even if you kind of screw up the spraying you can always color sand the paint according to the directions supplied with the paint.


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#6 kwooten31

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 06:15 PM

automative spray cans, then follow up with some clear automotive, it will look good!
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#7 numberonecoog

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 12:05 AM

I used rustolem spray paint.

Pro Tip: take your time taping. I didnt and it looked like crap and had to redo it all
Driver- Adams Fast 12 LS 9.5
3 Wood- 910F 15 degree
3h,4h Adams Pro
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#8 bladestriker

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 12:18 AM

I've used this with great success for a murdered out look

Posted Image
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#9 360_CS

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 01:33 AM

View Postnumberonecoog, on 26 March 2013 - 12:05 AM, said:

I used rustolem spray paint.

Pro Tip: take your time taping. I didnt and it looked like crap and had to redo it all

+1 on the rustoleum

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#10 RookieBlue7

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 06:56 AM

Is flex additive necessary? Nope not at all. But it costs no extra here and it'll make the paint last longer against sky marks. Do what you want but I always have it added to paint when used on clubs. Have yet to see one sky mark. And I've done some clubs for buddies that define hacker. Did the same when I was converting composite softball bats for home run derby usage. Paint never marred

Edited by RookieBlue7, 26 March 2013 - 07:03 AM.


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#11 ronsc1985

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 07:12 AM

 FairwaySheriff, on 25 March 2013 - 11:47 PM, said:

 Nessism, on 25 March 2013 - 04:49 PM, said:

You sure flex additive is necessary? I'm not an expert on painting golf clubs, but I've painted a fair bit of stuff over the years and it strikes me as unnecessary.


It's not. Durability what’s needed not flexibility. Paint is already flexable. You never see a club’s crown paint crack because it flexed

 jtitleist12, on 25 March 2013 - 06:09 PM, said:

Also, do you have to scuff up the head to prep or can you just go right over existing paint as is?


Yes. You never want to paint something that has not been scuffed, it'll peel off. Do a paint search, there are several how to's that give step by step's

 ronsc1985, on 25 March 2013 - 06:10 PM, said:

Contrary to popular belief, automotive coatings have to be fairly flexible since the body panels move around some due to temperature changes and road conditions.

I've painted quite a few heads with two part urethane paint. Depending on how picky you are you can get a show car finish if you want. Even if you kind of screw up the spraying you can always color sand the paint according to the directions supplied with the paint.

True on the paint flex. About the 2 part urethane you use, one part is the paint itself. Is the other part  thinner or hardner?
These work great if don't have a compressor & are not using a rattle can
Posted Image
The acrylic urethane I use is three parts base and one part activator by volume. There is no thinner involved, it is sprayed as mixed. It requires no primer on the usual bead blasted surfaces found on club heads .

As a side note most all automotive rattle can paints are lacquer. This is so because lacquer sticks to most anything. That's the good news. The bad news is the coating isn't very tough or long lasting which is why NO automotive manufacturer has used lacquer for a long time. No single stage, room temperature, air cured paint has the durability and toughness of two part systems.

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#12 RookieBlue7

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 07:17 AM

They also use lacquer because it dries so fast. The carrier in it flashes off quickly and dries quickly. They don't want rattle can that takes a few days to dry once it gets to a tack.

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#13 jtitleist12

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 06:43 AM

So back to the example of painting an Adams Fast 12 LS with the stock matte silver crown...

Since the driver is already a matte finish and there is no clear coat to rough up, couldn't I just use the matte silver as the "primer" and just paint directly over that?  Wouldn't the paint adhere to this?

I don't understand why there is a need to sand all the time in between coats or right at the start if there is no shiny clear coat to rough up or any imperfections to take care of?  Can anyone comment on this please?

Thanks,

- Josh

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#14 Upgrayedd

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 07:26 AM

 kwooten31, on 25 March 2013 - 06:15 PM, said:

automative spray cans, then follow up with some clear automotive, it will look good!
I agree. The clear coat layers are important.

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#15 Nessism

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 07:26 AM

 jtitleist12, on 29 March 2013 - 06:43 AM, said:

So back to the example of painting an Adams Fast 12 LS with the stock matte silver crown...

Since the driver is already a matte finish and there is no clear coat to rough up, couldn't I just use the matte silver as the "primer" and just paint directly over that?  Wouldn't the paint adhere to this?

I don't understand why there is a need to sand all the time in between coats or right at the start if there is no shiny clear coat to rough up or any imperfections to take care of?  Can anyone comment on this please?

Thanks,

- Josh

Even with a matte finish top coat, I'd scuff the paint before applying anything on top.  I wouldn't remove the old paint unless there are graphic's lines that will show though your fresh paint.  I'd use a scotchbrite pad and soap and water to scuff the old paint, then shoot your color right on top,  Sanding primer coats is to remove imperfections in the layers.  If you use primer and don't have any flaws, then you don't need to touch it, just spray the next layer right on top.

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TEE XCG7 Beta fairway woods/hybrid
Ping G irons w/Recoil 110's
Glide 55/60 wedges
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#16 ronsc1985

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 11:22 AM

 jtitleist12, on 29 March 2013 - 06:43 AM, said:

So back to the example of painting an Adams Fast 12 LS with the stock matte silver crown...

Since the driver is already a matte finish and there is no clear coat to rough up, couldn't I just use the matte silver as the "primer" and just paint directly over that?  Wouldn't the paint adhere to this?

I don't understand why there is a need to sand all the time in between coats or right at the start if there is no shiny clear coat to rough up or any imperfections to take care of?  Can anyone comment on this please?

Thanks,

- Josh
There are basically two ways paint sticks to other paint.

1. The solvent in the new paint partially disolves the top layer of the old paint and then new paint melds in with the former coating.

2. You provide enough surface area by sanding so that there is a lot of interface area between the two coats. The scratches made by the sandpaper greatly increase the available bonding surface. Remember whan you hit a golf club like a wood the whole surface flexes to some extent not just the face. If you don't have good adhesion the paint will flake off.

For 1 you have to know what the old paint was and if the new paint will bite into it. If the old paint is a two part cured finish this is highly unlikely. If you are using some rattle can laquer type paint you can test the surface to see if a little laquer thinner will remove any of the previous coating.

Usually you are better off sanding because you really don't know what the chemical composition of the original coat is. Even a matte finish needs sanding. The dull appeaaracnce doesn't necessarily mean there is much more surface area then a high gloss type. If it's an OEM finish you can bet your last dollar it's some type of cured coating either by a two part system and/or a baked finish where the high temperature activates the chemical reaction.

I don't understand our reluctance to sand. It's easy and maximizes the chances the job will
turn out well. Even between coats it's not a bad idea since unless you work in a perfectly dust free enviroment, like a down draft spray booth, you may get some dust particles in the finish as it dries.

Edited by ronsc1985, 29 March 2013 - 11:23 AM.


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#17 jtitleist12

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 03:58 PM

Thanks for all the responses guys!

I just want to make sure I do everything right if I decide to take on this project.

What grit sand paper is best to use for sanding?

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#18 Nessism

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 04:22 PM

 jtitleist12, on 29 March 2013 - 03:58 PM, said:

Thanks for all the responses guys!

I just want to make sure I do everything right if I decide to take on this project.

What grit sand paper is best to use for sanding?


600 grit or a gray scotchbrite pad works well for final prep before painting.

Edited by Nessism, 29 March 2013 - 04:35 PM.

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Glide 55/60 wedges
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#19 Colej

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Posted 29 March 2013 - 08:38 PM

 ronsc1985, on 29 March 2013 - 11:22 AM, said:

 jtitleist12, on 29 March 2013 - 06:43 AM, said:

So back to the example of painting an Adams Fast 12 LS with the stock matte silver crown...

Since the driver is already a matte finish and there is no clear coat to rough up, couldn't I just use the matte silver as the "primer" and just paint directly over that?  Wouldn't the paint adhere to this?

I don't understand why there is a need to sand all the time in between coats or right at the start if there is no shiny clear coat to rough up or any imperfections to take care of?  Can anyone comment on this please?

Thanks,

- Josh
There are basically two ways paint sticks to other paint.

1. The solvent in the new paint partially disolves the top layer of the old paint and then new paint melds in with the former coating.

2. You provide enough surface area by sanding so that there is a lot of interface area between the two coats. The scratches made by the sandpaper greatly increase the available bonding surface. Remember whan you hit a golf club like a wood the whole surface flexes to some extent not just the face. If you don't have good adhesion the paint will flake off.

For 1 you have to know what the old paint was and if the new paint will bite into it. If the old paint is a two part cured finish this is highly unlikely. If you are using some rattle can laquer type paint you can test the surface to see if a little laquer thinner will remove any of the previous coating.

Usually you are better off sanding because you really don't know what the chemical composition of the original coat is. Even a matte finish needs sanding. The dull appeaaracnce doesn't necessarily mean there is much more surface area then a high gloss type. If it's an OEM finish you can bet your last dollar it's some type of cured coating either by a two part system and/or a baked finish where the high temperature activates the chemical reaction.

I don't understand our reluctance to sand. It's easy and maximizes the chances the job will
turn out well. Even between coats it's not a bad idea since unless you work in a perfectly dust free enviroment, like a down draft spray booth, you may get some dust particles in the finish as it dries.

That's the way I was taught to paint by sanding between coats.They make tac clothes for this reason.

Granted I am not some body shop guru but I can paint body panels on cars pretty well and heavy equipment.

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#20 mrgolfalot1

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 01:42 PM

I would just go with a ClubCrown, www.clubcrown.com , they hold up great and look as if painted on


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#21 Neverfaze

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 04:27 PM

How about plastidip? Looks good if done right with a sprayer, and you can buy glossifier if you don't like the matte look. I used it to black out the emblems on my car (actually scheduling a full car "dip" in a few weeks). I tried it on an old fairway wood and it came out pretty good, and you can remove it if you happen to mess up with no repercussions.

edit: if you want to see what it looks like just search plastidip on youtube, alot of cool videos on what it looks like, how easy it peels off, etc.

Edited by Neverfaze, 03 June 2013 - 04:29 PM.


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#22 larrybud

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 01:13 PM

From what I understand from painting my own car a few years ago is that flex additives eventually leech out of the paint, and are only necessary when painting something like a fascia which is off the car and installed after the paint has dried.

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#23 zodiackill

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 03:08 PM

Hey there guys. Interested in possibly trying this this summer. I want to change the green portion on my RFE to matte black, and possibly my 3deep to a gloss black(however I haven't found if this has any durability issues.) just wondering if you guys could point me in the direction of the best how-to thread on this. I've read all of deerslayers "murdering a set of ping's" but wondered if there was anything a bit better. Let me know, thanks.
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#24 kbrussell

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 04:33 PM

 bladestriker, on 26 March 2013 - 12:18 AM, said:

I've used this with great success for a murdered out look

Posted Image
  +1000

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#25 R Hagan

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 02:50 PM

My father in law just did his R1 and he used this stuff

image.jpg

It came out nice I think. He just finished yesterday and hasn't played yet so not sure about durability

image.jpg

image.jpg

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#26 johnohare

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 12:30 PM

I have a Carbon Fiber ClubCrown.  Cooler than any of the finishes you are talking about here...and a lot easier to do...

www.clubcrown.com

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Edited by johnohare, 10 June 2013 - 12:31 PM.


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#27 rocket21

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 02:18 PM

Hoping to reactivate this thread. I have entered the club painting/refinishing fray as the old clubs are still the good ones!  Fast LS came out pretty good with Duplicolor perfect mtch..   I tend to reshaft often to try new shafts out.  Will the spray paint/duplicolor hold up to the heat required to pull fixed heads?  If not, it makes me wonder if bbq grill or high heat paint is a better option?  Anyone try these?

Edited by rocket21, 28 January 2014 - 09:32 AM.


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#28 asw7576

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Posted 16 September 2015 - 11:28 AM

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

I repainted the silver stripe ( hideous looking at address ) with Tamiya polycarbonate paint white PS1

Now it look handsome, all white with unique accent on it.
Drivers : Taylormade RBZ, RBZ Stage 2, Jetspeed, SLDR S, Callaway
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