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Careers in Golf (Engineering)


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#1 JJensen

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 10:12 PM

Hey guys,

I am looking at going into Engineering for college, and would like to get into a golf club company for my career. What degree would you recommend? I was thinking mechanical would be the way to go, but i'm not sure....

any help from my fellow WRXr's?

Thanks A Lot guys!
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#2 Rock Chalk Jayhawk

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 11:40 PM

Materials engineering with a heavy emphasis on finite element analysis.  Are you wanting to design or build golf clubs? You could also explore industrial engineering, which would get you into the construction of clubs.

If you plan on getting more than a Bachelor's degree, Mechanical Engineering would give you a great foundation to build upon.  Definitely want to focus on materials science no matter what .

Edit: I studied Mechanical Engineering and hated it. Make sure whatever field you study, that you enjoy it. If you find yourself wondering if every class is a weed out class, find a different major. Also, I hope that you are either in the top 0.5% of mathematical ability or you have exceptional study skills, because Engineering is freaking hard.  You will routinely put in 15-20 hours per week of studying.

Edited by Rock Chalk Jayhawk, 08 November 2012 - 11:44 PM.


#3 augusta13

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:45 AM

I recommend periodically checking the web sites of major manufacturers for job postings (often found under a Corporate link).  The postings should give you some idea of the qualifications and duties of various positions. Good luck.

#4 MDP1555

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 09:31 AM

If looking to be in the club manufacturing industry or golf course equipment manufacturing then lean towards mechanical engineering with intrest in metalergy. If looking to getting into golf course / residential community development, course design or course construction then civil engineering is the best path. If looking to get into horticultural golf industry such as golf course superintendent or turf grass development industry then agricultural engineering with specialty in turf grass science.

Edited by MDP1555, 09 November 2012 - 09:52 AM.


#5 highergr0und

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 09:43 AM

If you're serious about working as an engineer in the industry, I would take some classes to learn Chinese.


#6 OUZO Power

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:20 AM

Mechanical Engineering for sure.

What I would do is contact one of the Site Sponsors. Like Callaways Harry A.

I'm sure he would point you in the right direction. Give you a name in their R&D department. They would advise you what the best educational route would be to get where you want to be.

Edited by OUZO Power, 09 November 2012 - 10:22 AM.

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#7 stevehj

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:30 AM

Trying to target such a niche industry might be a bit of challenge.  I remember being on the same quest over 30 years ago and struck out.  After graduation, I tried to contact golf club manufacturer's about positions in golf club design, but no one was hiring.  I took a job elsewhere, but after a while I decided I wanted really to be involved in golf.  So went to work in a golf shop.  But with an engineering degree, the impatience of youth, and a desire to work for more than peanuts, I didn't stick with it and eventually ended up in the computer industry.

But that is my story, if your heart is really set on golf club design, you might contact Tom Wishon who is a poster here on Golfwrx.  Also Ari Techner, president of Scratch Golf has also been a frequent contributor.  There are now many small golf mfg'ing companies that might be willing to offer some advice and guidance. Shoot, maybe Scotty Cameron might respond to an inquiry.

I might also suggest that you widen your goals a bit to give you a larger pool of opportunity.  For example, there is a huge industry in golf course maintenance equipment and golf carts.  Similarly, there are many shaft manufacturer's and accessories manufacturer's like Sun Mountain.  If you are a competitive golfer and decide to work to get your class A PGA card after graduation, there will be many contacts that you run into associated with the golf business and that might lead to an unexpected opportunity.  I guess the message I am trying to suggest is, if you really love golf, there are lots of jobs in the golf industry that will keep you close to the game and people that love it, and you might find those jobs are just as great as golf club design.

Good luck on your quest.

#8 JJensen

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 11:32 AM

Thanks A Ton guys! Being a Senior this year i have kinda been freaking out trying to figure out what to do. I am very good in math/science, but English is not a problem either. I am pretty open to the different fields, but would really like to stick to either clubs or shafts, maybe bags. I guess i really don't know. I'll try to contact Harry/Ari/Tom and see what i can find out.
Thanks Again!
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#9 MDP1555

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 11:38 AM

View PostJJensen, on 09 November 2012 - 11:32 AM, said:

Thanks A Ton guys! Being a Senior this year i have kinda been freaking out trying to figure out what to do. I am very good in math/science, but English is not a problem either. I am pretty open to the different fields, but would really like to stick to either clubs or shafts, maybe bags. I guess i really don't know. I'll try to contact Harry/Ari/Tom and see what i can find out.
Thanks Again!

Just be aware the jobs you want are limited in quantity. A degree that gives you flexibility in industry will serve you well while you search for your preferred career.

#10 gimpolean

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 07:04 PM

I'd agree with the above posters.  I have a mechanical engineering degree and took a job with an oil & gas company after college.  I started getting tired of the work after a few years so I started looking for a new job and actually interviewed with one of the major club manufacturers.  The work wasn't as interesting as you might think.  The pay was going to be about 20-25% less, benefits were worse and for the first 1-2 years the job would have been to sit in a cubicle all day working on CAD drawings.  A lot of the more interesting R&D jobs in the industry require 15+ years of experience and/or advanced degrees if you are willing to invest that time and money.  If you do want to go that route, to get started you need to know one of the big 3D modeling programs like Pro-E.  Any electives in materials would probably help too.

Basically I learned quickly that a job is a job.  You still have to work 8-12 hours a day and have very little time for golf anyway.  You want to find something you like, but you also want to make your time worthwhile.  Either way, an engineering job is still a great way to go because they are in high demand and lots of employers will hire engineers for non-engineering jobs. Plus the money is great, especially in oil & gas.


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#11 mws92

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 10:00 PM

Mechanical Engineering and/or Materials Science

While a job is a job, if you are truly passionate about what u do it will make life a lot better.

You cannot go wrong with an engineering degree. Finance, consulting, engineering positions. It's a very versatile degree. Even better if you can get a minor in design or Econ or something else non-technical.




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