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Squish n turn


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#1 vision541

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 04:38 PM

I was following squish n' turn about a year ago and never hit the ball with better compression.....has anyone read any of his posts recently?I would love to start a new forum regarding his philosophy.

Vision54


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#2 mizunostaffer

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 04:44 PM

do you have a link, never heard of the guy

cheers

#3 vision541

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 04:53 PM

View Postmizunostaffer, on 04 February 2012 - 04:44 PM, said:

do you have a link, never heard of the guy

cheers
No....I was conversing with him via a we site from Hawaii.The pro was Kelvin Miyahara and he is doing some top grade research. Sir Squish , as he was referred to, was blogging and I asked him a few questions. I found his answers exceptionally helpful but I haven' seen him around on any of the bog sites.

#4 henricogolfer

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 05:22 PM

Would like to read as well.

#5 stryper

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 11:36 AM

View Postmizunostaffer, on 04 February 2012 - 04:44 PM, said:

do you have a link, never heard of the guy

cheers
This

UST Mamiya for Life!!!

#6 mkel2011

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 11:41 AM

View Postvision541, on 04 February 2012 - 04:38 PM, said:

I was following squish n' turn about a year ago and never hit the ball with better compression.....has anyone read any of his posts recently?I would love to start a new forum regarding his philosophy.

Vision54

Here's a link to some articles by Kelvin Miyahira going back to 2006:

http://www.aroundhaw...d_training.html

#7 carrera

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 02:48 PM

There sometimes seems to be more golf blogs than McCarthy's in an Irish phone book, but here is a new one that has Kelvin's material:

http://jeffygolf.com...yahira-Archives

#8 vision541

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 04:46 PM

View Postcarrera, on 05 February 2012 - 02:48 PM, said:

There sometimes seems to be more golf blogs than McCarthy's in an Irish phone book, but here is a new one that has Kelvin's material:

http://jeffygolf.com...yahira-Archives
T
Thanks Jeff...
But as a followers and blogger at Kelvins site, my question was about one of his bloggers who goes by the name of 'squish n' turn'...I had found him very helpful but have not seen him on any blogs and was wondering if anyone had his email.

Thanks anwa and I joined your blog...

Peter

#9 carrera

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 06:14 PM

View Postvision541, on 05 February 2012 - 04:46 PM, said:

View Postcarrera, on 05 February 2012 - 02:48 PM, said:

There sometimes seems to be more golf blogs than McCarthy's in an Irish phone book, but here is a new one that has Kelvin's material:

http://jeffygolf.com...yahira-Archives
T
Thanks Jeff...
But as a followers and blogger at Kelvins site, my question was about one of his bloggers who goes by the name of 'squish n' turn'...I had found him very helpful but have not seen him on any blogs and was wondering if anyone had his email.

Thanks anwa and I joined your blog...

Peter

FYI, I am not Jeff...I'm just a guy who likes reading about the golf swing.

#10 Not Yogi

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 10:14 PM

Peter..Sir Stryper's link is the place where Squish made his last appearance.  His basic doctrine is hard for most to swallow...which is "You can't buy a swing".
I met him online at the Golf Channels longest running, highest commented instruction thread called "18 Theories"  It was started with a guy talking about the new book "The Secret of Golf" by George Peper and Mary Tiegreen.  He then mentions the last chapter about a guy named Count Yogi.  It got one or two replies and died for TWO years.  The guy who revived it was Yogimus Maximus who claimed to know all things Count Yogi.  Anyway, with Yogimus's input, the thread burst like wildfire over a period of nearly two years.  Then, they lost it.  We found an old cache and started it again.  That's when I found Squish on Kelvin's site.  They had just discussed Bubba's power.  Squish was very convincing with his citations of Hogan, Mike Austin, Snead and other greats.  I stalked him and finally found him and invited him to 18.  He probably wrote half of the 200 some pages.  Then the forum shut down.  

I have a friend who might have many of his great posts saved.  I'll ask him to post them here.  Squish is a national treasure.  He says he figured out his swing by simply apeing Bobby Jones.  Then he went on to study Mike Austin..Then Yogi.  He's probably golfing all the time and doesn't get online much.


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#11 vision541

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Posted 05 February 2012 - 10:31 PM

Thanks for responding....I first met squish on Kelvins site and found his insights and directions easy to assimilate. I have been following Kelvin for years and love to challenge my mental capacity with his golf wisdom. I decided recently to g et back in touch with Sir Squish but have not been able to locate him and I lost his email address.

I would be very grateful if you are able to have your friend post some of Tom's writings.

Thank you.
Peter

#12 Squish

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 09:43 AM

View Postvision541, on 05 February 2012 - 10:31 PM, said:

I would be very grateful if you are able to have your friend post some of Tom's writings.

Thank you.
Peter

  Once one understands the 7th cervical as the swing center, it proves that golf is not a left or right sided game.

  One must visualize the spine as a pendulum, with the fixed point in space being 7C.  The sacrum or tailbone swings only a distance of 12 inches from the top of the swing, within the boundaries of the knees.

  The sacrum swings six inches from address to the top, and twelve inches to the finish. That's not much movement. The sacrum must be allowed to swing, aided via gravity. It is not a bump, slide, push or pull, but a swing of the sacrum and hip. From the top of the swing, the first move must however be a turn. So it is a compound action, a compression of the side coupled with a turn, therefore a swing and turn, not a swing then turn.  The free turn of the shoulder girdle around C7, coupled with a proper release, is the key to distance, power and accuracy. The rebound of on plane shoulder muscles supply the oomph. The release or snap of the club head by swinging out, supplies the speed.

  The turn of the hip does not produce power, the hip turn provides position.  It is commonly mistakenly referred to as a clearing of the hip. There must be resistance to this return back to the ball, just as there should be resistance taking it to the top, to keep 7C stable or centered.  This "resistance" is achieved via a  torquing of the left tibia and fibula in the back swing and a Torquing of the right tibia and fibula in the return swing through impact.  This torquing, from the knee down can clearly be seen in all elite swings. The eversion (coming out) of the heels, limits the hip turn in either direction.  

  What allows the hips to swing is a detachment of the heel of the opposing side. How the heel detaches is paramount to a sound swing. The respective side compresses with the contraction of the quadratus lumborum  a sheet like muscle that attaches the twelfth rib to the crest of the hip.  This muscle, because of it center location, equally drops the shoulder as it raises the heel. Raising the heel or dropping the shoulder independently will cause a train wreck.

  If one can visualize the rotation of the shoulder girdle around C7 and the spine and sacrum swinging under C7, one can see how important it is to keep it centered on an X, Y, and Z axis. Any lateral moment in the downswing, of the top of the spine target ward, will cause one to decelerate the club head.   One is trying to generate centrifugal force, via a minimal, centered, centripetal burst, by letting it go throwing the club out. The grip must be correct, the pressure must be maintained at the pinky of the left hand and most important the base of the right index finger against the handle.  

  Hitting up on the ball supplies compression.  Because the spine swings up on the left side, the right side rotating shoulder girdle is coming down hard. So the faster one hits up, the faster the right comes down. This is not a rocking of the shoulders; it is a free turn of the shoulders coupled with an upward swing of the spine as the ball is struck.  

  The release is an action of the left humerus.  It must be done with the left arm. From the top, coming into impact, the back of the left hand and the left elbow must be pointing target ward.

  At the moment of impact, the left elbow should snap, now pointing down, as the back of the left hand continues on its path of the free rotating shoulder girdle. This action of the left humerus  is done from the left rotor cuff.  The humerus was rotate away and loaded from take away.

  What I feel at the top is that I want to hit the ball as the weight transference occurs.

  No thought to transferring the weight just turn from the top. and hit the ball.
The "hitting up" is a given as an effect of the swing of the spine.


  If I get to the left side before the strike, all power is lost.

  I want my weight behind the ball through impact. I finish left by standing up.

  That allowed me to release.

  


Edited by Squish, 15 March 2012 - 09:44 AM.


#13 Squish

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 09:49 AM

A proper grip is one that that is neutral on a flat lie, hands neither high nor low.
Most  golfers try to adopt Hogan's ulna deviation (high hands), but may not  realize his clubs were adjusted 5* to 8* flat, to accommodate his  stature.
Golfers at  the range, who practice on mats, play sole flat lies, with respect to  the lie angle manufactured into each club, as it should be.
But  most would be surprised to know that when playing on the hillside  course, with the ball below the feet, a perfectly straight shot
can  be achieved by simply ulna deviating the wrists at address and through  impact. There is absolutely no advantage to closing the stance.
One  can simply match the sole of the club parallel to the slope. Same when  the ball is above the feet. Use radial flexion of the wrists (low  hands),
to match  the up slope without opening the stance. This is a most consistent  method as one is does not have to change ones swing to accommodate the  situation.
I find  keeping the wrists dynamic and adjustable in situations allow one to  develop a repeating swing action. Don't change the swing, adjust the  wrists.

Hand position is more crucial than ball position. At address the hands should always be in line with the left heel and left ear.
The right palm should always be perpendicular to the flight line throughout the set.
When playing a wedge the ball position should be six inches back to accommodate the lead angle manufactured into the club.
The  left hand does not palmar flex to get the club head back there six  inches, but the left hand is made stronger by rotating the
Hand and thumb 90* to the right, the right hand position never changes it remains target ward.
If  one does not strengthen the left hand via rotation, they will palmar  flex and de-loft the club and not attain optimal trajectory.
That  leads to inconsistency, and guessing. If one takes that same wedge and  plays it off the left heel and ear, both thumbs in line, they are adding  loft.
For a 2 iron  the ball is ˝ inch behind, a 3 iron one inch, a 4 iron 1 ˝ inches, 5  iron 2 inches, 6 iron 2 ˝, 7 iron 3 inches etc.
The  left hand rotates incrementally to the right with this, to keep the  face square as the ball will be struck steeper, earlier on the arcthe  shorter the club gets.
But  the hand position never changes, the club head and ball is behind, so  the release point radian of the hands never ever changes.
That keeps the swing consistent and repeatable.
It is a pretty weird feeling of having the hands release well ahead of the ball and club head.
As one is hitting up with the swinging torso, the hands well ahead of the ball, the club head is coming down hard.
At  first try, it can cause one to reach back and stop ones all important  continued shoulder rotation,( move C7 back and scoop) but when one  experiences the accuracy of the method It comes pretty quick.
Each club has its lead loft and lie angle, and they must be respected.

#14 Squish

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 10:39 AM

The "Right Angle"

Think more like this vs swinging the 7.

(figure three)
The left humerus laterally rotates through impact and the left elbow releases down, this allows the right arm to turn over using only the right rotor cuff.
This slowly closes the face against the left to right spin that is being applied to the ball via the free shoulder turn.
It feels over the top. but it is over the top from the inside out.
The closing face checks the slice spin, therefore one can let the shoulder girdle turn as fast as they like without fear of hooking.  



Attached File  stop.png   183.94K   106 downloads

Edited by Squish, 15 March 2012 - 10:41 AM.


#15 henricogolfer

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 07:31 PM

Thanks


#16 Ricco

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 08:03 PM

More please!

#17 kevn357

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 12:03 AM

I really missed Squish. I can't blame you for leaving but I'm glad you're back.  No one makes me google human anatomy while reading a golf thread like you do! Awesome info as usual.

More!

#18 megaprimatus

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 10:19 AM

View PostSquish, on 15 March 2012 - 09:49 AM, said:

Each club has its lead loft and lie angle, and they must be respected.

Many intriguing ideas posted here recently. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Squish.

It is interesting to view the set of clubs as an array of precision instruments, as opposed to treating them as a mere bundle of random tree  limbs. Squish's description of setup hints at an underlying awareness that each club is actually a graduated tool. Each tool part of a greater set. Each tool calibrated to a distinct set of angles.

Edited by megaprimatus, 16 March 2012 - 06:48 PM.


#19 megaprimatus

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 04:53 PM

View PostSquish, on 15 March 2012 - 09:49 AM, said:

  Hand position is more crucial than ball position. At address the hands should always be in line with the left heel and left ear.
The right palm should always be perpendicular to the flight line throughout the set.
When playing a wedge the ball position should be six inches back to accommodate the lead angle manufactured into the club.
The  left hand does not palmar flex to get the club head back there six  inches, but the left hand is made stronger by rotating the
Hand and thumb 90* to the right, the right hand position never changes it remains target ward.
If  one does not strengthen the left hand via rotation, they will palmar  flex and de-loft the club and not attain optimal trajectory.
That  leads to inconsistency, and guessing. If one takes that same wedge and  plays it off the left heel and ear, both thumbs in line, they are adding  loft.
For a 2 iron  the ball is ½ inch behind, a 3 iron one inch, a 4 iron 1 ½ inches, 5  iron 2 inches, 6 iron 2 ½, 7 iron 3 inches etc.
The  left hand rotates incrementally to the right with this, to keep the  face square as the ball will be struck steeper, earlier on the arcthe  shorter the club gets.
But  the hand position never changes, the club head and ball is behind, so  the release point radian of the hands never ever changes.
That keeps the swing consistent and repeatable.
It is a pretty weird feeling of having the hands release well ahead of the ball and club head.
As one is hitting up with the swinging torso, the hands well ahead of the ball, the club head is coming down hard.
At  first try, it can cause one to reach back and stop ones all important  continued shoulder rotation,( move C7 back and scoop) but when one  experiences the accuracy of the method It comes pretty quick.
Each club has its lead loft and lie angle, and they must be respected.



Squish,

Not sure if you're out there in hyperspace...
Just wondering, is the following illustration related to your discussion above?


Posted Image

Edited by megaprimatus, 08 April 2012 - 04:55 PM.


#20 megaprimatus

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 05:09 PM

Animated GIF file submitted for general consideration:
Posted Image

Edited by megaprimatus, 08 April 2012 - 05:13 PM.


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#21 megaprimatus

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 10:14 PM

Perhaps the system of precision club placement & grip adjustment described by Squish has no relation to the illustration from Hogan's book. Still, it is interesting to note that Hogan solved his hook (at least partly) by making an interesting adjustment to his left thumb placement on the club. Hogan's right hand seemed to maintain an identical position. Curious.

A system of dual-handed calibration.

I'm guessing that Hogan is holding a driver in the photo below. Hard to say, really - but I've got a hunch that Ol' Ben spent his restless nights preoccupied with the hook that his driver created - not the hook that his wedge created. Heck, even field mice don't worry about wayward wedge shots.


Attached File  hoganshift2.jpg   131.4K   37 downloads

Photo from "This Is My Secret," Life Magazine, 1955

Edited by megaprimatus, 10 April 2012 - 10:33 PM.


#22 RBImGuy

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 11:30 PM

View Postmegaprimatus, on 10 April 2012 - 10:14 PM, said:


A system of dual-handed calibration.

I'm guessing that Hogan is holding a driver in the photo below. Hard to say, really - but I've got a hunch that Ol' Ben spent his restless nights preoccupied with the hook that his driver created - not the hook that his wedge created. Heck, even field mice don't worry about wayward wedge shots.



Normally you shift the grip a little between shorter to longer clubs and also change the stance accordingly. so once you figured out each difference for your own build and body type and timing its play time. I like Hogans swing, pre-accident when he didn't have a injured swing.
I only hit it straight
Feeling of Greatness
More of the same

#23 megaprimatus

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 09:05 PM

Greetings Flopper,

Thanks for taking the time to respond. I like Hogan's pre-accident swing, too - not as much as the swing of Bobby Jones, I openly admit; however, it is not my intention to criticize Hogan in the least. On the contrary.

I suppose what interests me here is the desire to understand the high-octane explanation offered by Squish above. Among other things, in very short order, Squish described a very specific system of dual-handed calibration.

Maintaining the right palm perpendicular to the flight line for all clubs, but varying the rotation of the left palm (dependent on the specific club being used) strikes me as a fairly unique set up method. Mike Austin described a similar manner of placing one's hands on the club in Austinology, but Austin's description was not as clear. Again, I am not intending to disrespect Austin. On the contrary.

Anyhow, recently I noticed Hogan maintaining his right palm orientation and rotating (supinating) his left palm during set up. Something about this caught my eye. Hogan described this independent left forearm adjustment as part of his secret. I offered the recent pictures from the Land of Hogan in an effort to understand the posting by Squish and generate discussion.

Flopper, by chance, would you know of anyone else describing this dual-handed calibration system? You know, ancient writings from the old masters or the like…

Edited by megaprimatus, 11 April 2012 - 09:06 PM.


#24 Squish

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 11:46 AM

It's the lead angle of the club in reference to the sole.

This way all shots can be played from a square toe line, parallel to the flight line, Including shots above and below the feet for straight shot results.
Ulna deviate with Ball below. Radial flex ball above.
So at address I square the toes, then turn the front heel inward. This puts me on my right side behind the ball.
With the front foot flared out, the heels are closed.  The more you flair the front foot the more closed the stance.

Now at address, I am slightly torquing the hips target ward with an outward twist of the right foot against a closing low inside shoulder takeaway.
I am then ready to spring from a 1 inch take away to full swing.

The weight transference approaching and at impact is more at the balls of the feet. The at the top and finish; at the heels.

Edited by Squish, 16 April 2012 - 12:12 PM.


#25 megaprimatus

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 11:20 PM

"So at address I square the toes, then turn the front heel inward. This puts me on my right side behind the ball. With the front foot flared out, the heels are closed. The more you flair the front foot the more closed the stance."

Turn the front heel inward. (Turning the front toe outward would be a different action.)

Mmm... The heels do become closed...

Cool.


Posted Image


#26 RBImGuy

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 02:25 AM

View Postmegaprimatus, on 11 April 2012 - 09:05 PM, said:

Greetings Flopper,

Thanks for taking the time to respond. I like Hogan's pre-accident swing, too - not as much as the swing of Bobby Jones, I openly admit; however, it is not my intention to criticize Hogan in the least. On the contrary.

I suppose what interests me here is the desire to understand the high-octane explanation offered by Squish above. Among other things, in very short order, Squish described a very specific system of dual-handed calibration.

Maintaining the right palm perpendicular to the flight line for all clubs, but varying the rotation of the left palm (dependent on the specific club being used) strikes me as a fairly unique set up method. Mike Austin described a similar manner of placing one's hands on the club in Austinology, but Austin's description was not as clear. Again, I am not intending to disrespect Austin. On the contrary.

Anyhow, recently I noticed Hogan maintaining his right palm orientation and rotating (supinating) his left palm during set up. Something about this caught my eye. Hogan described this independent left forearm adjustment as part of his secret. I offered the recent pictures from the Land of Hogan in an effort to understand the posting by Squish and generate discussion.

Flopper, by chance, would you know of anyone else describing this dual-handed calibration system? You know, ancient writings from the old masters or the like…

All that must have a reference in the case its ball impact and ballflight.
I dont concern myself much with details, do a few adjustments and check impact and ballflight, and you have the answer in the dirt.
I only hit it straight
Feeling of Greatness
More of the same

#27 Squish

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 06:15 AM

"Turn the front heel inward. (Turning the front toe outward would be a different action.)"

By turning the front foot out, one is craving for a cut or slice, as it puts the weight left with open hips.
It promotes over the top.

The stance is 12 to 15 inches heel to heel.
I find with closed heels and square toes, the flight is always straight to draw, with the hip still able to clear....
IF..... one torques the right foot from the top, away from the target, to begin the transition.
That's the squat.

Edited by Squish, 17 April 2012 - 06:45 AM.


#28 megaprimatus

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 11:47 PM

So, let me get this lead angle thing straight in my mind… If one were to take three clubs - let's say, a sand wedge, a mid-iron, and a driver and organized them with all their face grooves perpendicular to the line of flight… with all their handle tips located at a similar elevation from the ground…

Attached Files


Edited by megaprimatus, 18 April 2012 - 12:07 AM.


#29 megaprimatus

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 11:48 PM

This would be the lead angle of the driver... And the lead angle of the sand wedge would be more acute...Right?

Attached Files


Edited by megaprimatus, 18 April 2012 - 12:03 AM.


#30 Squish

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 07:12 AM

Attached File  Untitled.png   211.49K   37 downloads


You have the Idea, but it is more precise than that.
I really like your animated images, thanks for taking the time.

The soles of all clubs in this slide are not flat to the ground, all the clubs are d-lofted.
Of course the handle butts are correct.
The driver has a negative lead angle as do rescue clubs and the hybrid long irons.
Standard irons have positive lead angles.

I'm not very good with paint but here goes.

This is the wedge;

Attached File  lead angle.png   6.3K   57 downloads

Edited by Squish, 18 April 2012 - 07:19 AM.


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