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Dormant bermuda or overseeded rye greens?


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#1 Simp

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 01:38 PM

If your area of the country does either, which do you prefer? Having grown up playing down south, most courses overseed with rye during the winter, making for some pretty greens, but our club didn't overseed this year. Choosing instead, to let the bermuda go dormant and playing on it all winter. Asthetically, they're not the prettiest greens in the world and you'll never think you're putting at Augusta Nat'l, but I must admit that I like the dormant bermuda over rye. The grain is a non-factor, the moisture is low and the speed of the greens compare to some of the fastest bent greens that I've played on (Aronimink, Baltusrol, TPC Jasna Polana and  The Ridge to name a few). What's your experience with regards to playing on dormant bermuda or rye grass greens?

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#2 fairways4life

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 02:01 PM

You may not think the greens are much to look at now but by not overseeding they will be all that much better in the spring time. Overseeding is nice for the winter but it takes them a bit longer to recover from the overseed and get back to normal again in the spring. I bet you will find that your greens will be better this spring and summer than they were in past springs and summers when they were coming off on overseeded winter.

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#3 Hoot151

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 04:41 PM

I live in Texas and the last 2 courses I played had dormant bermuda.  I have to admit I was not a fan of hitting into what looks like a dirt patch.  I'll probably stay on bent grass greens for the rest of the winter.

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#4 Superlad

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 10:29 PM

I'm from the South and a lot of courses have began to not overseed at all.  Normally rye is reserved for Tees, Fairways and Rough.  Poa Trivallis/Bent is normally used on the greens if they are overseeded.  These grasses have a finer leaf texture which results in better ball roll.  I'm personally a fan of playability.  If the dormant grass can withstand the traffic I'd prefer dormant greens.  They will roll much better that way.

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#5 teejaywhy

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 11:31 PM

I really don't understand the aversion to the visual thing.  Unless you are on the ladies committee where the green presentation is necessary to compliment the flower beds.  Golf is all about the playing surface.  On a private course with limited rounds, dormant bermuda greens are the bomb - firm, fast and true.   It doesn't work well on a public course where too much traffic will chew them up.

I should add that it is a rare thing here in Phoenix where most courses compete for winter visitors and green brings green.  Southern Dunes used to play on dormant Bermuda greens in the winter and I got to experience them a few times after they started allowing public play.  Unfortunately, they now overseed to attract the tourists.

Edited by teejaywhy, 27 April 2012 - 11:43 PM.


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#6 sabram

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 11:58 PM

View Postteejaywhy, on 27 April 2012 - 11:31 PM, said:

I really don't understand the aversion to the visual thing.  Unless you are on the ladies committee where the green presentation is necessary to compliment the flower beds.  Golf is all about the playing surface.  On a private course with limited rounds, dormant bermuda greens are the bomb - firm, fast and true.   It doesn't work well on a public course where too much traffic will chew them up.

I should add that it is a rare thing here in Phoenix where most courses compete for winter visitors and green brings green.  Southern Dunes used to play on dormant Bermuda greens in the winter and I got to experience them a few times after they started allowing public play.  Unfortunately, they now overseed to attract the tourists.

It's like talking to a wall. I'd guess that only 10% of golfers would agree "Brown is beautiful"

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