Jump to content

Welcome, Guest. You are currently viewing the forum as a guest which does not give you access to all the great features at GolfWRX such as viewing all the images, interacting with existing members and access to certain forums. Join our community today and enter into a chance to win a free regular giveaways. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

- - - - -

Drills for getting weight to left side on the downswing...


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 pianoman0123

pianoman0123

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 226 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 108157
  • Joined: 05/18/2010
  • Location:Myrtle Beach, SC
  • Ebay ID:Lindseyrollings2009
GolfWRX Likes : 2

Posted 04 July 2011 - 06:53 PM

I have a tendency to "lag back" on my right side on my swing... just wondering if anyone had any good drills they could share on getting my weight transferred to my left side so that I finish on my left side...
Thanks....


Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


You are currently viewing the forum as a guest which does not give you access to all the great features at GolfWRX such as viewing all the images, interacting with existing members and access to certain forums. Join our community today and enter into a chance to win a free regular giveaways. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

#2 russc

russc

    Hall of Fame

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,390 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 113539
  • Joined: 08/27/2010
  • Location:northern New Jersey
GolfWRX Likes : 279

Posted 04 July 2011 - 09:41 PM

View Postpianoman0123, on 04 July 2011 - 06:53 PM, said:

I have a tendency to "lag back" on my right side on my swing... just wondering if anyone had any good drills they could share on getting my weight transferred to my left side so that I finish on my left side...
Thanks....

Pressure your left heel strongly at transition

#3 keygolf

keygolf

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 505 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 64061
  • Joined: 08/24/2008
  • Location:Tennessee
GolfWRX Likes : 7

Posted 04 July 2011 - 10:17 PM

A drill for that is questionable, since hanging back indicates defending against making a mistake. The denfensive position comes from being afraid for some reason. If you can think of a drill to defeat fear, you are in business.

#4 Archimedes

Archimedes

    Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 58 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 116810
  • Joined: 10/29/2010
GolfWRX Likes : 1

Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:19 AM

I don't have that drill. I can't help you. I was never good enough to move my weight to the right and then move it back to the left. I had a great weight shift, but it was from too far right back to center, not right to left, it never got left enough. When I started fooling around with centered swings, I was finally able to stay closer to the center (not move my right hip to the right) and then shift my weight from the center to the left. This all started with the below video of Tiger Woods and Adam Scott side by side. I was amazed that they did not "shift" their weight to the right as much as I thought they did, or as much as I was originally taught to do. What I was told was they they "feel" a weight shift to the right due to the weight of their arms and club over their right thigh, but their right hip does not "shift" or "slide" to the right, and the center of mass between their shoulders does not slide to the right. The position of the center of mass between their shoulders comes from their setup position, not from a move to the right.

This is the video that started my journey. Look at how they maintain the alignment of their right ankle, right knee, and right hip during the back swing. Look at how their right knee cap continues to point in the same direction. So then duing the down swing their weight shift is simply their hips moving toward the target.



And then look at this one of Adam Scott. Not very much weight shifted to the right, so then his weight shift is all left left left:



#5 Scottk

Scottk

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 598 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 69932
  • Joined: 11/28/2008
GolfWRX Likes : 29

Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:57 AM

View PostArchimedes, on 05 July 2011 - 08:19 AM, said:

  What I was told was they they "feel" a weight shift to the right due to the weight of their arms and club over their right thigh, but their right hip does not "shift" or "slide" to the right, and the center of mass between their shoulders does not slide to the right.  


You make some excellent points in your post.  However, I think many people equate a weight shift to the right with a hip slide to the right.  I don't know of any great golfers that really sway their hips to the right.  

To me, getting to the right side simply means feeling the pressure in the right knee on the back swing.  (Turning into the right side) I have seen many great ball strikers move their upper center off the ball (behind the ball) without moving their hips the right.  That is not a sway if the lower center does not move to the right.  

In short, you can still get a great weight shift to the right and easily get back to left if the lower center does not move off the ball.


#6 thedillz

thedillz

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 254 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 128468
  • Joined: 05/10/2011
  • Location:Western MA.
GolfWRX Likes : 12

Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:08 AM

View PostScottk, on 05 July 2011 - 08:57 AM, said:

View PostArchimedes, on 05 July 2011 - 08:19 AM, said:

  What I was told was they they "feel" a weight shift to the right due to the weight of their arms and club over their right thigh, but their right hip does not "shift" or "slide" to the right, and the center of mass between their shoulders does not slide to the right.  


You make some excellent points in your post.  However, I think many people equate a weight shift to the right with a hip slide to the right.  I don't know of any great golfers that really sway their hips to the right.  

To me, getting to the right side simply means feeling the pressure in the right knee on the back swing.  (Turning into the right side) I have seen many great ball strikers move their upper center off the ball (behind the ball) without moving their hips the right.  That is not a sway if the lower center does not move to the right.  

In short, you can still get a great weight shift to the right and easily get back to left if the lower center does not move off the ball.

+1 - I tend to think of it more in a "loading up" on the right side as apposed to shifting. this is more for my own good to ensure I'm not sliding right.

#7 kevcarter

kevcarter

    Legend

  • ClubWRX Charter Members
  • 10,575 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 3616
  • Joined: 07/28/2005
GolfWRX Likes : 1001

Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:23 AM

View Postkeygolf, on 04 July 2011 - 10:17 PM, said:

A drill for that is questionable, since hanging back indicates defending against making a mistake. The denfensive position comes from being afraid for some reason. If you can think of a drill to defeat fear, you are in business.

Very interesting, I had not thought of it that way before...

Kevin
I could be wrong.
I have been before.
I will be again.
========================================
GEOMETRICALLY ORIENTED LINEAR FORCE
========================================

#8 keygolf

keygolf

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 505 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 64061
  • Joined: 08/24/2008
  • Location:Tennessee
GolfWRX Likes : 7

Posted 05 July 2011 - 09:51 PM

View Postkevcarter, on 05 July 2011 - 10:23 AM, said:

View Postkeygolf, on 04 July 2011 - 10:17 PM, said:

A drill for that is questionable, since hanging back indicates defending against making a mistake. The denfensive position comes from being afraid for some reason. If you can think of a drill to defeat fear, you are in business.

Very interesting, I had not thought of it that way before...

Kevin

Profiling students for the last 30 years has revealed very interesting data. Players whose responses indicate that they tend to diminish their intensity typically show issues like deceleration in swinging and putting, reverse pivot, trouble getting off the right side (for a right hander) and truncated back and through swinging, among others. Players who show a tendency to over-extend of their intensity complain of over-swinging, coming over the top, coming up and out of shots, winding up on their toes, and going over the left side, plus duck hooks and wild slices, among others. All of that can be pin-pointed to attempts to be "in control," which is anathema to a golf swing (though "sluggers" may get way with some of it). Search for control is tied to "pressure" (which is really a symptom of the presence of excessive anxiety). The constructive alternative is in learning how to manage one's game, and that begins with self-management.

Only a few are willing to discuss such things, however, since that seems to most  to constitute an "injustice" to conventional wisdom, and usually gets a "do not disturb" sign.

#9 kevcarter

kevcarter

    Legend

  • ClubWRX Charter Members
  • 10,575 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 3616
  • Joined: 07/28/2005
GolfWRX Likes : 1001

Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:25 PM

View Postkeygolf, on 05 July 2011 - 09:51 PM, said:

View Postkevcarter, on 05 July 2011 - 10:23 AM, said:

View Postkeygolf, on 04 July 2011 - 10:17 PM, said:

A drill for that is questionable, since hanging back indicates defending against making a mistake. The denfensive position comes from being afraid for some reason. If you can think of a drill to defeat fear, you are in business.

Very interesting, I had not thought of it that way before...

Kevin

Profiling students for the last 30 years has revealed very interesting data. Players whose responses indicate that they tend to diminish their intensity typically show issues like deceleration in swinging and putting, reverse pivot, trouble getting off the right side (for a right hander) and truncated back and through swinging, among others. Players who show a tendency to over-extend of their intensity complain of over-swinging, coming over the top, coming up and out of shots, winding up on their toes, and going over the left side, plus duck hooks and wild slices, among others. All of that can be pin-pointed to attempts to be "in control," which is anathema to a golf swing (though "sluggers" may get way with some of it). Search for control is tied to "pressure" (which is really a symptom of the presence of excessive anxiety). The constructive alternative is in learning how to manage one's game, and that begins with self-management.

Only a few are willing to discuss such things, however, since that seems to most  to constitute an "injustice" to conventional wisdom, and usually gets a "do not disturb" sign.

Again, very interesting, and I appreciate your sharing. Sorry to seem dense, but could you please explain "diminish their intensity" and "over-extend of their intensity " as relates to the golf swing?

Thank You KeyGolf!  :hi:

Kevin
I could be wrong.
I have been before.
I will be again.
========================================
GEOMETRICALLY ORIENTED LINEAR FORCE
========================================

#10 grahler

grahler

    Tour Winner

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 759 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 106822
  • Joined: 04/24/2010
GolfWRX Likes : 34

Posted 05 July 2011 - 11:31 PM

Simple mans opinion-if you are hanging back you are not using your body in the best way to provide power and speed to your swing.  I suggest taking a club like a seven iron and doing a drill on the range.  Take it back way shorter than normal like halfway back.  The key is feeling like it is not even back halfway-now try to hit the ball with power.
Obviously do not hurt yourself.  I have found that if a golfer truly feels the club is not all the way back and then tries to hit far the body will automatically begin to work correctly.
You will find that you may hit it farther than you can think you can with a much shorter arm travel.
I had a major problem with a poor pivot and basically reworked my whole move with this idea-I now shoot in the 70's regularly.  Takes a lot of timeand effort though and a lot of balls on the range.


Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


You are currently viewing the forum as a guest which does not give you access to all the great features at GolfWRX such as viewing all the images, interacting with existing members and access to certain forums. Join our community today and enter into a chance to win a free regular giveaways. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

#11 Lefthook

Lefthook

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,052 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 101445
  • Joined: 01/06/2010
GolfWRX Likes : 132

Posted 06 July 2011 - 09:02 AM

View Postpianoman0123, on 04 July 2011 - 06:53 PM, said:

I have a tendency to "lag back" on my right side on my swing... just wondering if anyone had any good drills they could share on getting my weight transferred to my left side so that I finish on my left side...
Thanks....

You could try a combination of "rope handling: and "aiming point".

Rope handling is a swinger's concept ( as opposed to a hitter who will use axe handling). The idea is to pull the rope - as if the shaft couldn't handle any torque at all. Do your best to leave the clubhead hanging behind while you simply pull the butt end of the club. This will initiate a throwout  where the club itself is released by centrifugal force.

Aiming point would be the point where you direct your pulling. The down stroke should be aiming down, out and forward. Naturally, there shouldn't be any forward early on, but a lot of down. Not being able to shift weight is often the result of an improper down swing where the player goes straight at the ball with a hand path that is not properly curved. In other word there's too little down and too much forward. Adjust your aiming point towards the target line, but behind your back foot. When you try to drag the club towards China a weight shift to the front foot is quite natural and this will also help you maintain more lag between your pivot and your hands towards and through impact.




#12 tembolo1284

tembolo1284

    Jack still da man!

  • ClubWRX Charter Members
  • 17,087 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 71802
  • Joined: 01/03/2009
  • Location:NYC
  • Handicap:Beef
GolfWRX Likes : 1621

Posted 06 July 2011 - 09:35 AM

wow...fun thread.
Wishon 919 THI 11* 0.5* Open
Wishon 929 HS 14.5*, 19* 0.5 Open
Wishon 775HS 22*, 25*
Wishon 5, 6 560 MC 7-PW MMC MB
Wishon 54, 59 Micro-Groove HM
All shafts are S2S Stepless Steel Wishon

#13 keygolf

keygolf

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 505 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 64061
  • Joined: 08/24/2008
  • Location:Tennessee
GolfWRX Likes : 7

Posted 06 July 2011 - 02:13 PM

View Postkevcarter, on 05 July 2011 - 10:25 PM, said:

View Postkeygolf, on 05 July 2011 - 09:51 PM, said:

View Postkevcarter, on 05 July 2011 - 10:23 AM, said:

View Postkeygolf, on 04 July 2011 - 10:17 PM, said:

A drill for that is questionable, since hanging back indicates defending against making a mistake. The denfensive position comes from being afraid for some reason. If you can think of a drill to defeat fear, you are in business.

Very interesting, I had not thought of it that way before...

Kevin

Profiling students for the last 30 years has revealed very interesting data. Players whose responses indicate that they tend to diminish their intensity typically show issues like deceleration in swinging and putting, reverse pivot, trouble getting off the right side (for a right hander) and truncated back and through swinging, among others. Players who show a tendency to over-extend of their intensity complain of over-swinging, coming over the top, coming up and out of shots, winding up on their toes, and going over the left side, plus duck hooks and wild slices, among others. All of that can be pin-pointed to attempts to be "in control," which is anathema to a golf swing (though "sluggers" may get way with some of it). Search for control is tied to "pressure" (which is really a symptom of the presence of excessive anxiety). The constructive alternative is in learning how to manage one's game, and that begins with self-management.

Only a few are willing to discuss such things, however, since that seems to most  to constitute an "injustice" to conventional wisdom, and usually gets a "do not disturb" sign.

Again, very interesting, and I appreciate your sharing. Sorry to seem dense, but could you please explain "diminish their intensity" and "over-extend of their intensity " as relates to the golf swing?

Thank You KeyGolf!  :hi:

Kevin

A properly administered profile (one that is not aimed merely at "personality") shows the difference between what a person actually owns in behavioural traits (as best that person is able to know him or herself, which typically gets about an 80% accuracy) and what he or she tries to do to "get better." When the respondent gets to the "get better" side he/she will either show trying to reach "the goal" by either cautiously pursuing it or going hell-bent for leather. Caution invariably shows reducing trait intensity; bucking the barriers invariably shows over-extending (After more than 60,000 done, we've yet to see more than a handful of those who maintained their intensity, Striving is virtually always causing changes in behaviour and those will go "up" or "down"). The correlations between those findings and what the player actually does, and the questions they ask provide the rest of the information needed to know whether any associated problem is physical or mental and it is usually some of  both, so both need addressing. Listening carefully to the questions and statements players ask  or make on the forum give great clues to which way they are attempting to go, too.




#14 LottaBalata

LottaBalata

    Mr. Title-less

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 288 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 54603
  • Joined: 04/27/2008
  • Location:Indiana
GolfWRX Likes : 4

Posted 06 July 2011 - 02:22 PM

A drill my pro gave me was to address the ball, put your weight on your left foot, and drop your right foot straight back about a foot 1/2.  You are basically standing on one leg.  

Some of you guys get WAY too technical.  Not everyone is as good a golfer as some of you.  The guy's asking for a drill, not psychiatric treatment.

#15 MonteScheinblum

MonteScheinblum

    The Mad Bomber

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,334 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 94238
  • Joined: 09/12/2009
  • Location:Southern California
GolfWRX Likes : 1938

Posted 06 July 2011 - 03:00 PM

View Postpianoman0123, on 04 July 2011 - 06:53 PM, said:

I have a tendency to "lag back" on my right side on my swing... just wondering if anyone had any good drills they could share on getting my weight transferred to my left side so that I finish on my left side...
Thanks....

I am sure you will get several good ones from other posters, so I will offer a less common one.

Lift your left heel off the ground on the back swing and initiate the down swing by putting it back on the ground.

Pulling the handle
I am so so steep
Shankopotomus finds me
.
.
I am Gavrilo Princip

#16 kevcarter

kevcarter

    Legend

  • ClubWRX Charter Members
  • 10,575 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 3616
  • Joined: 07/28/2005
GolfWRX Likes : 1001

Posted 06 July 2011 - 03:05 PM

View Postkeygolf, on 06 July 2011 - 02:13 PM, said:


A properly administered profile (one that is not aimed merely at "personality") shows the difference between what a person actually owns in behavioural traits (as best that person is able to know him or herself, which typically gets about an 80% accuracy) and what he or she tries to do to "get better." When the respondent gets to the "get better" side he/she will either show trying to reach "the goal" by either cautiously pursuing it or going hell-bent for leather. Caution invariably shows reducing trait intensity; bucking the barriers invariably shows over-extending (After more than 60,000 done, we've yet to see more than a handful of those who maintained their intensity, Striving is virtually always causing changes in behaviour and those will go "up" or "down"). The correlations between those findings and what the player actually does, and the questions they ask provide the rest of the information needed to know whether any associated problem is physical or mental and it is usually some of  both, so both need addressing. Listening carefully to the questions and statements players ask  or make on the forum give great clues to which way they are attempting to go, too.

Thanks again!

Kevin
I could be wrong.
I have been before.
I will be again.
========================================
GEOMETRICALLY ORIENTED LINEAR FORCE
========================================

#17 hoganfan924

hoganfan924

    Hall of Fame

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,024 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 24689
  • Joined: 01/28/2007
  • Location:White Lake, Michigan
GolfWRX Likes : 405

Posted 06 July 2011 - 03:10 PM

A lot of players who hang back do so for a very good reason, for if they didn't, they'd hit a huge open faced slice, or at least that's what their previous experience tells them will happen.

#18 MonteScheinblum

MonteScheinblum

    The Mad Bomber

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,334 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 94238
  • Joined: 09/12/2009
  • Location:Southern California
GolfWRX Likes : 1938

Posted 06 July 2011 - 03:16 PM

View Posthoganfan924, on 06 July 2011 - 03:10 PM, said:

A lot of players who hang back do so for a very good reason, for if they didn't, they'd hit a huge open faced slice, or at least that's what their previous experience tells them will happen.

The best post in the thread.
Pulling the handle
I am so so steep
Shankopotomus finds me
.
.
I am Gavrilo Princip

#19 keygolf

keygolf

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 505 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 64061
  • Joined: 08/24/2008
  • Location:Tennessee
GolfWRX Likes : 7

Posted 06 July 2011 - 04:18 PM

View PostMonteScheinblum, on 06 July 2011 - 03:16 PM, said:

View Posthoganfan924, on 06 July 2011 - 03:10 PM, said:

A lot of players who hang back do so for a very good reason, for if they didn't, they'd hit a huge open faced slice, or at least that's what their previous experience tells them will happen.

The best post in the thread.

Yep, Monte - the fear of slicing.....

#20 pianoman0123

pianoman0123

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 226 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 108157
  • Joined: 05/18/2010
  • Location:Myrtle Beach, SC
  • Ebay ID:Lindseyrollings2009
GolfWRX Likes : 2

Posted 06 July 2011 - 07:05 PM

Thanks for the posts...  Lottabalata, that's the exact drill I was told to do by my Local Pro... it's worked out great for me... I'm making much better and consistent ball contact... and as one poster mentioned... I'm not a pro, but at one time I played to a 2 handicap... it was like I woke up one day and lost 20 yards with every club... Now I play to a 6... so I'm not a hacker at all... but I don't believe you have to get worse to get better either, hence why I asked for some drills...  Thanks again for the input so far....


Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


You are currently viewing the forum as a guest which does not give you access to all the great features at GolfWRX such as viewing all the images, interacting with existing members and access to certain forums. Join our community today and enter into a chance to win a free regular giveaways. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

#21 LottaBalata

LottaBalata

    Mr. Title-less

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 288 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 54603
  • Joined: 04/27/2008
  • Location:Indiana
GolfWRX Likes : 4

Posted 07 July 2011 - 01:07 AM

View Postpianoman0123, on 06 July 2011 - 07:05 PM, said:

Thanks for the posts...  Lottabalata, that's the exact drill I was told to do by my Local Pro... it's worked out great for me... I'm making much better and consistent ball contact... and as one poster mentioned... I'm not a pro, but at one time I played to a 2 handicap... it was like I woke up one day and lost 20 yards with every club... Now I play to a 6... so I'm not a hacker at all... but I don't believe you have to get worse to get better either, hence why I asked for some drills...  Thanks again for the input so far....

Hey sorry!  Didn't mean to seem like I called you a hack!  Lol. . .I think sometimes I don't realize the quality of some of the golfers that post here.  I'm glad that drill is working for you.  I used it considerably last year to improve my swing.  Works wonders on getting the "feeling" of your weight being loaded on your left.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

GolfWRX Sponsors